Recumbents are getting silly now!!!

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Gadget, Apr 30, 2003.

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  1. Gadget

    Gadget Guest

    Yesterday I had the chance of a day off from work and I took it. With last minute desicion I headed
    of Epping Forest for a bomb around with the feeling that every other tom dick and harry with a bike
    will be at work. This turned out to be true on most parts but there was was one other cyclist in
    EF. As I was bombing down a trail, I was rather stunned to be over taken by a bloke on slim
    recumbent. The trail was not the best suited even for my MTB and this guy looked like if he hit
    another bump the 'bent would throw him. I'm not sure about the width of this contraption but it was
    a lot narrower than usual 'bents. And have all 'bents got small BMX style wheels or do you reckon
    that this was a custom job. Do they retail these? Does any of the 'bent riders know of this design
    and/or model?

    And on a personal note I don't mind you taking over the roads but please leave our trails alone. :eek:)

    JK

    Gadget
     
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  2. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Gadget wrote:

    > was bombing down a trail, I was rather stunned to be over taken by a bloke on slim recumbent. The
    > trail was not the best suited even for my MTB and this guy looked like if he hit another bump the
    > 'bent would throw him.

    The only time a 'bent is a liability off-road is if you need to shift your weight around to maintain
    balance. Many trails the only problem per se is a rough surface, but many 'bents have suspension so
    that's less of an issue really, and even unsuspended ones generally have shock absorption in the
    seat to a fair degree. BikeE actually made a purpose built off-road model called the FX at one
    point. Ben "Kinetics" Cooper has a festive picture in the shop of him getting quite a bit of air on
    his old Streetmachine, fitted with knobblies for the occasion.

    > not sure about the width of this contraption but it was a lot narrower than usual 'bents.

    I'm not sure quite what you mean by that. 'Bent bikes, like most upright bikes, are narrower
    than their riders aside from the handlebars, but even then only usually only on under-seat
    steering models. The frame is still just a tube, and shoulders will generally be outside the
    seat in any case.

    > And have all 'bents got small BMX style wheels

    Plenty do. 20" wheels are very common on 'bents. Probably the most common wheel size, in fact. A few
    are 26" both ends, quite a few are 20" front 26" rear. Some go down to 16" front or both.

    > or do you reckon that this was a custom job. Do they retail these? Does any of the 'bent riders
    > know of this design and/or model?

    Rather difficult to tell from that description. As above, "slim" doesn't really mean anything as on
    a large percentage of models the rider's the widest part, and small wheels are if anything more
    common than big ones. There are certainly plenty of 20"/20" slim designs you can buy, though it
    still may have been a home-build.

    > And on a personal note I don't mind you taking over the roads but please leave our trails
    > alone. :eek:)

    People have been riding "road" bikes on trails ever since there were bicycles. You certainly don't
    need an MTB unless you want to go as fast and/or rough as possible along them. Usually the case that
    all you need to do a typical off-road trail through woods is the assumption that you can. Most
    modern 'bents should be at least as good for the job as the old Raleigh "racers" with steel wheels
    and Weinman "brakes" we used to hack around woods on when I was a sprog.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  3. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    What do you mean "getting"?

    ~PB :)
     
  4. >Ben "Kinetics" Cooper has a festive picture in the shop of him getting quite a bit of air on his
    >old Streetmachine, fitted with knobblies for the occasion.

    Bent knobblies sounds quite nasty ;-)

    Cheers, helen s

    ~~~~~~~~~~
    Flush out that intestinal parasite and/or the waste product before sending a reply!

    Any speeliong mistake$ aR the resiult of my cats sitting on the keyboaRRRDdd
    ~~~~~~~~~~
     
  5. Danny Colyer

    Danny Colyer Guest

    wafflycathcsdirtycatlitter wrote:
    > Bent knobblies sounds quite nasty ;-)

    Indeed.

    I've lost all the other posts in this thread (been playing with my PC date, and OE was set to delete
    messages 14 days after downloading), so I can't reply to the original post as I had intended. But
    anyway, it seemed like a good excuse to post the Bent Xtreme link again: http://cybercondor.free.fr/

    Seems to be missing at the moment, but then accessing this particular page has always seemed a bit
    hit and miss.

    There are some movies somewhere of someone getting air on a Hurricane. Can't seem to find the link
    for those at the moment though.

    --
    Danny Colyer (remove safety to reply) ( http://www.juggler.net/danny ) Recumbent cycle page:
    http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/recumbents/ "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." -
    Thomas Paine
     
  6. Gadget

    Gadget Guest

    Ok then, this is a better description on what I saw. This 'bent had what look like a 3 wheel
    configuration. One wheel at the front and two at the back. The two back ones looked so close
    toghether but you could make out a chain in between the two. The tyres themselves looked about 18
    inches and 2 inches wide. The chain ran flat to the ground, not upright like upright bikes. The seat
    looked to be about 6 inches from the ground and about 1 inch from the back wheel. He had a cable in
    hands which I presume is for steering or brakes.

    Does this offer any better clues to the make and model

    Gadget
     
  7. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Gadget wrote:
    > Ok then, this is a better description on what I saw. This 'bent had what look like a 3 wheel
    > configuration. One wheel at the front and two at the back. The two back ones looked so close
    > toghether but you could make out a chain in between the two. The tyres themselves looked about 18
    > inches and 2 inches wide. The chain ran flat to the ground, not upright like upright bikes. The
    > seat looked to be about 6 inches from the ground and about 1 inch from the back wheel. He had a
    > cable in hands which I presume is for steering or brakes.

    Not *that* many Delta 'bent trikes (one wheel at the front, two at the back) so that narrows it
    down. The most obvious suspect of those I know would be a Hase Kettwiesel: see
    http://kinetics.org.uk/html/kettwiesel.html and http://www.bikefix.co.uk/b-kettwiesel.html (latter
    has quite a good rear view which may help establish if that was it) but it may well have been a
    homebuild.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  8. Seamus

    Seamus New Member

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    My Challenge Mistral handles moderate rough stuff capably with front an rear suspension and 20" fr and r wheels with 1.5" Scwalbe Marathon tyres.

    Whilst fixing a puncture on Sunday a Canadian cyclist stopped for a look and said, "I've seen road versions of those before but I've never seen a mountainbike one."

    26" wheels would be better off road, perhaps a Challenge Distance or maybe an Optima Orca or Condor.
     
  9. Gadget

    Gadget Guest

    "Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Gadget wrote:
    > > Ok then, this is a better description on what I saw. This 'bent had what look like a 3 wheel
    > > configuration. One wheel at the front and two at the back. The two back ones looked so close
    > > toghether but you could make out
    a
    > > chain in between the two. The tyres themselves looked about 18 inches
    and 2
    > > inches wide. The chain ran flat to the ground, not upright like upright bikes. The seat looked
    > > to be about 6 inches from the ground and about 1
    inch
    > > from the back wheel. He had a cable in hands which I presume is for
    steering
    > > or brakes.
    >
    > Not *that* many Delta 'bent trikes (one wheel at the front, two at the back) so that narrows it
    > down. The most obvious suspect of those I know would be a Hase Kettwiesel: see
    > http://kinetics.org.uk/html/kettwiesel.html and http://www.bikefix.co.uk/b-kettwiesel.html (latter
    > has quite a good rear view which may help establish if that was it) but it may well have been a
    > homebuild.
    >
    > Pete.
    > --
    > Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells
    > Hospital Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    > http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
    >

    Nope, must have been a home build. The wheels on that delta at the back are too far apart. The one
    that shot past me had about an inch between the back wheel. And the chain was horizontal.

    Gadget
     
  10. Gadget

    Gadget Guest

    Oh and on the mention of horizontal chains this guy's one went into a gear box and an axle came up
    between the back wheels from the box.

    Oh boy I'd be useless as witness for anything criminal

    Gadget
     
  11. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Gadget wrote:

    > And the chain was horizontal.

    Ohhhh... just figured out what you meant by that! I don't know of any production machines with that.
    Though I'm certainly not familiar with everything available, most production 'bents are actually
    pretty conventional as far as the drive transmission goes as it means you can use standard parts.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  12. Guy Chapman

    Guy Chapman Guest

    Peter Clinch <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > The most obvious suspect of those I know would be a Hase Kettwiesel

    Which was, according to legent, named after the old Geoffrey Bayldon series with the "telling bones"
    and such :)

    see http://tv.cream.org for more on Catweazle, and other fine examples of televisual entertainment.
     
  13. On 1 May 2003 22:00:27 +0950, Seamus <[email protected]> wrote:

    >My Challenge Mistral handles moderate rough stuff capably with front an rear suspension and 20" fr
    >and r wheels with 1.5" Scwalbe Marathon tyres.

    SWMBO is looking at one of they. What are the plusses/minuses of them? They certainly look nice.

    >Whilst fixing a puncture on Sunday a Canadian cyclist stopped for a look and said, "I've seen road
    >versions of those before but I've never seen a mountainbike one."
    >
    >26" wheels would be better off road, perhaps a Challenge Distance or maybe an Optima Orca
    >or Condor.

    Never thought of that. I'll have to try it. :)
    --
    DG

    Bah!
     
  14. Ian Smith

    Ian Smith Guest

    On Thu, 1 May 2003, Gadget <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > wheel. And the chain was horizontal.

    I don't understanmd this - all my normal, diamond-frame bikes have chains that are mostly
    horizontal. My recumbent also does, but why the repeated statement that this is a
    distinguishing feature?

    I can't imagine an arrangement in which a chain is other than substantially horizontal.

    regards, Ian SMith
    --
    |\ /| no .sig
    |o o|
    |/ \|
     
  15. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Ian Smith wrote:

    > I don't understanmd this - all my normal, diamond-frame bikes have chains that are mostly
    > horizontal. My recumbent also does, but why the repeated statement that this is a distinguishing
    > feature?
    >
    > I can't imagine an arrangement in which a chain is other than substantially horizontal.

    It was gnawing at me at well, then occurred to me that what he meant was the drive chain runs in a
    plane parallel to the ground, rather than orthogonal to it. Which, if I've got that right, is very
    odd indeed!

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  16. Danny Colyer

    Danny Colyer Guest

    Ian Smith wrote:
    > I can't imagine an arrangement in which a chain is other than substantially horizontal.

    You tend to see a lot of vertical chain on front wheel drive bikes, like this one:
    http://toxy.wurzel6-webdesign.de/english/produkte/toxy-zr/index.htm

    Of course, you'd see a lot more vertical chain if the picture had been taken from the other side.

    --
    Danny Colyer (remove safety to reply) ( http://www.juggler.net/danny ) Recumbent cycle page:
    http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/recumbents/ "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." -
    Thomas Paine
     
  17. John J

    John J Guest

    Was the horizontal chain part of a steering mechanism? i.e. was it a front wheel drive, rear steer,
    delta trike?

    It certainly sounds a homebuild.

    John J http://xntrick.co.uk/
     
  18. Keith

    Keith Guest

    Peter Clinch wrote ....
    > Gadget wrote:
    >
    > > I was rather stunned to be over taken by a bloke on slim recumbent. The trail was not the
    > > best suited even for my MTB and this guy looked like if he hit another bump the 'bent would
    > > throw him.
    >
    > The only time a 'bent is a liability off-road is if you need to shift your weight around to
    > maintain balance. Many trails the only problem per se is a rough surface, but many 'bents have
    > suspension

    Michael Rogan produces a fully suspended foldable trike, the Swift Adventure. There's a pic at

    http://www.mrrecumbenttrikes.com/

    I saw it in action at the Oz HPV rally a couple of months ago: a real fun machine. It's not the
    'slim recumbent' you saw, but worth looking at.
     
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