Recumbents - friendliest mode of transportation?

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Robert Haston, Dec 2, 2003.

  1. I have come to realize that how we get around has a huge amount to do with how we greet others.
    Wrap me in the big dark diesel work truck and I drive aggressively and anonymously. Put me in the
    Volvo wagon and I become the genteel safety conscious suburbanite. Afoot I am pleasant, but find it
    easy to turn away and miss greeting those I don't want to. On my racing bike I am hunched over
    gripping my bars purposefully, with little more to spare than a businesslike mini-wave. On my
    mountain bike I swerve and hop about, attentive to the terrain and anxious to prove my skills (or
    avoid disproving them).

    But upon my recumbent I come down the path or side street as open as sitting on my front porch
    swing, head back and hands already up on the bar - practically waving already. I couldn't cut
    through the bushes if I wanted to, so here I come wearing my subdued recumbent garb riding a bike
    about as snooty as a Labrador pup. If bikes were cars, my recumbent is the Mustang convertible the
    Mayor rides in the parade. Far more people than I have ever met know me as the guy who rides that
    slinky purple bike. I am no stranger to the thousands of strangers in my town.

    What would the world be like if we all rode recumbents?

    --
    Robert Haston Satellite Beach, FL
     
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  2. Real LITE guy

    Real LITE guy New Member

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    I too ride a recumbent. I used to ride a road bike, but got home remembering only the white line or someone's butt. Since going exclusively recumbent about 5 years ago, I've found that often the best part of my ride was when I stop to talk with people. Or to take in the scenery.

    I love talking with kids. Often, they will force me to stop by yelling "cool bike". For fun, I have two horns and a dinggy bell. On my front rack, Daffy Duck rides, all stretched out on his back with his legs crossed. We're both having fun.

    When on tour, loaded with camping gear, I believe I am the least intimidating stranger around. I couldn't steal anything - how would I carry it? And as for the getaway, a recumbent isn't exactly a ubiquitous white van.

    When I've been in areas that seem to have no recumbents, like rural West Virginia or Alabama, my bike is even more inviting. People come up loaded with questions. I'll bet that doesn't happen often on a racing bike or a mountain bike.

    Dick Janson
    Just me and Sarah Dipitee
     
  3. Robert Haston <[email protected]> wrote:

    : But upon my recumbent I come down the path or side street as open as sitting on my front porch
    : swing, head back and hands already up on the bar - practically waving already. I couldn't cut
    : through the bushes if I wanted to, so here I come wearing my subdued recumbent garb riding a bike
    : about as snooty as a Labrador pup. If bikes were cars, my recumbent is the Mustang convertible the
    : Mayor rides in the parade. Far more people than I have ever met know me as the guy who rides that
    : slinky purple bike. I am no stranger to the thousands of strangers in my town.

    It's the image and the peer pressure. On the trike I feel I'm supposed to wave.

    : What would the world be like if we all rode recumbents?

    Huh! All that waving!

    --
    Risto Varanka | http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/hpv/hpv.html varis at no spam please iki fi
     
  4. Harv

    Harv Guest

    "Robert Haston" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I have come to realize that how we get around has a huge amount to do with how we greet others.
    > Wrap me in the big dark diesel work truck and I
    drive
    > aggressively and anonymously. Put me in the Volvo wagon and I become the genteel safety conscious
    > suburbanite. Afoot I am pleasant, but find it
    easy
    > to turn away and miss greeting those I don't want to. On my racing bike I am hunched over gripping
    > my bars purposefully, with little more to spare than a businesslike mini-wave. On my mountain bike
    > I swerve and hop
    about,
    > attentive to the terrain and anxious to prove my skills (or avoid
    disproving
    > them).
    >
    > But upon my recumbent I come down the path or side street as open as
    sitting
    > on my front porch swing, head back and hands already up on the bar - practically waving already. I
    > couldn't cut through the bushes if I wanted to, so here I come wearing my subdued recumbent garb
    > riding a bike about
    as
    > snooty as a Labrador pup. If bikes were cars, my recumbent is the Mustang convertible the Mayor
    > rides in the parade. Far more people than I have
    ever
    > met know me as the guy who rides that slinky purple bike. I am no
    stranger
    > to the thousands of strangers in my town.
    >
    >
    > What would the world be like if we all rode recumbents?
    >
    > --
    > Robert Haston Satellite Beach, FL
    >
    >
    I'm glad that you're a nice guy in your Volvo. The last time I did a road ride a dick piloting a
    Volvo, with his family aboard passed me with about 4 angstroms clearance.
     
  5. Shortboat

    Shortboat Guest

    It was nice here today 37 digrees (30 degrees windchill) so I went for a ride on my TE complete with
    body sock. While riding dwon a residential street, the car I was meeting stopped, the driver rolled
    down his window and with an awed look on his face and a foreign accent I did not recognize said
    "nice bike". If I were not climbing a steep hill I would have stopped and informed him of the
    virtues of an enclosed bent. Who says we cannot get along with our neighbors?
     
  6. Bg

    Bg Guest

    Real LITE g, Just for clarification, there are 5 of us here in Alabama. ;-) But you are right, folk
    seem less threatened by a bent, and therefore friendlier. Although, too, it could be because they
    think I'm part of Homeland security. bill g

    Real LITE guy wrote:

    > When I've been in areas that seem to have no recumbents, like rural West Virginia or Alabama, my
    > bike is even more inviting. People come up loaded with questions. I'll bet that doesn't happen
    > often on a racing bike or a mountain bike.
    >
    > Dick Janson Just me and Sarah Dipitee
     
  7. "harv" <harv*no_spam*@spininternet.com> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > I'm glad that you're a nice guy in your Volvo. The last time I did a road ride a dick piloting a
    > Volvo, with his family aboard passed me with about
    4
    > angstroms clearance.
    >

    Angstroms - must be a problem with Swedish cars and the metric system. But inches aren't
    much better.
     
  8. jmo3

    jmo3 New Member

    Joined:
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    I went to the Stuart airshow a few weeks ago on my shiny red Tour Easy and got more attention from the folks on my bike than the F-15's were getting!! I heard: look at that bike,cool bike ,is that a bike,how fast does it go ,how much did it cost, and many more it was cool real attention getter I felt like zooming down the strip to show off the speed,but I didnt I just slow crused around
    :cool: :cool: :cool: :cool: :cool:
     
  9. OnYoLeft

    OnYoLeft New Member

    Joined:
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    Recumbent vs. Road Bike...Ride 50 miles on your road bike and then ride the same route on a recumbent. Something just tells me that the route will be much more enjoyable, and you'll notice so much more on a recumbent. I was hooked so fast, I bought a recumbent tandem.
     
  10. Gary Mc

    Gary Mc Guest

    When I first moved to Salt Lake City, I was impressed how folks tend to wave to neighbors like they
    do in more rural parts of my native state of Michigan. When I started riding a recumbent this
    recognition factor went even higher. Now that I ride a trike with a homemade fairing, I have
    practically become public property. I have become the neighborhood eccentric perhaps.

    It is mostly great. Folks wave and try to give you the right of way when it is not yours. (I always
    graciously refuse.) The only downside is that folks will sometimes stop in front of me on cross
    streets just to stare at me. Still one must take the good with the bad.

    It has been said before that if you abhor public recognition and social interaction, better stay
    away from recumbents.

    Gary McCarty, Greenspeed GTO, Salt Lake City
     
  11. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Robert Haston wrote:
    > ... What would the world be like if we all rode recumbents?

    Presumably, it would be much more laid back. (Sorry).

    Tom Sherman - Planet Earth
     
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