Red light dilemna (mildly OT)

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Chris B ., Jun 6, 2003.

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  1. Chris B .

    Chris B . Guest

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  2. S. Anderson

    S. Anderson Guest

    "Chris B." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Story at:
    >
    > http://www.ajc.com/news/content/news/0603/06redlight.html
    >
    > It seems that now those poor motorcyclists won't have to wait for an angelic cyclist to come along
    > and lay their bicycle down on the road or go and push the pedestrian button.
    >
    > Chris Bird

    I've had to go through reds before on my motorcycle. People I know have been ticketed for doing so
    and have easily won in court as well. I once sat at a light for 10 mins just to see how long it
    actually took before it changed...I eventually blew the red.

    Cheers,

    Scott..
     
  3. Mark

    Mark Guest

    "Chris B." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Story at:
    >
    > http://www.ajc.com/news/content/news/0603/06redlight.html
    >
    > It seems that now those poor motorcyclists won't have to wait for an angelic cyclist to come along
    > and lay their bicycle down on the road or go and push the pedestrian button.
    >
    > Chris Bird

    Around here the sensor controlled traffic lights can recognize a bicycle without any particular
    effort on the cyclist's part. In fact, some of the lights around here will change as I'm rolling up
    to them, and I won't even have to unclip from the pedals. What's wrong with the lights in Tennessee
    that they can't spot a motorcycle?
    --
    mark
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    >
    > "Chris B." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Story at:
    > >
    > > http://www.ajc.com/news/content/news/0603/06redlight.html
    > >
    > > It seems that now those poor motorcyclists won't have to wait for an angelic cyclist to come
    > > along and lay their bicycle down on the road or go and push the pedestrian button.
    > >
    > > Chris Bird
    >
    > Around here the sensor controlled traffic lights can recognize a bicycle without any particular
    > effort on the cyclist's part. In fact, some of the lights around here will change as I'm rolling
    > up to them, and I won't even have to unclip from the pedals. What's wrong with the lights in
    > Tennessee that they can't spot a motorcycle?
    > --
    > mark
    >
    >
    >

    Some are magnetic, some are optical and in your case it may be that the lights are simply on a
    default timer that changes regardless of traffic.
    --
    _________________________
    Chris Phillipo - Cape Breton, Nova Scotia http://www.ramsays-online.com
     
  5. Raymo853

    Raymo853 Guest

    Here in PA, some of the lights sense bikes and motorcycles and some do not. It all depends on the
    sensitivity of the sensor, thickness of the pavement, and so on.. According to the PA bicycle
    drivers manual, it is acceptable for bikes to run red lights that do not sense them after waiting
    and making sure it is clear.

    "mark" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Chris B." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Story at:
    > >
    > > http://www.ajc.com/news/content/news/0603/06redlight.html
    > >
    > > It seems that now those poor motorcyclists won't have to wait for an angelic cyclist to come
    > > along and lay their bicycle down on the road or go and push the pedestrian button.
    > >
    > > Chris Bird
    >
    > Around here the sensor controlled traffic lights can recognize a bicycle without any particular
    > effort on the cyclist's part. In fact, some of the lights around here will change as I'm rolling
    > up to them, and I won't even have to unclip from the pedals. What's wrong with the lights in
    > Tennessee that they can't spot a motorcycle?
    > --
    > mark
     
  6. > Some are magnetic, some are optical and in your case it may be that the lights are simply on a
    > default timer that changes regardless of traffic.

    You forgot about the most common type- accoustical. They won't change until they hear you unclip.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles www.ChainReaction.com

    "Chris Phillipo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] says...
    > >
    > > "Chris B." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > > Story at:
    > > >
    > > > http://www.ajc.com/news/content/news/0603/06redlight.html
    > > >
    > > > It seems that now those poor motorcyclists won't have to wait for an angelic cyclist to come
    > > > along and lay their bicycle down on the road or go and push the pedestrian button.
    > > >
    > > > Chris Bird
    > >
    > > Around here the sensor controlled traffic lights can recognize a bicycle without any particular
    > > effort on the cyclist's part. In fact, some of
    the
    > > lights around here will change as I'm rolling up to them, and I won't
    even
    > > have to unclip from the pedals. What's wrong with the lights in
    Tennessee
    > > that they can't spot a motorcycle?
    > > --
    > > mark
    > >
    > >
    > >
    >
    > Some are magnetic, some are optical and in your case it may be that the lights are simply on a
    > default timer that changes regardless of traffic.
    > --
    > _________________________
    > Chris Phillipo - Cape Breton, Nova Scotia http://www.ramsays-online.com
     
  7. mark wrote:
    > Around here the sensor controlled traffic lights can recognize a bicycle without any particular
    > effort on the cyclist's part. In fact, some of the lights around here will change as I'm rolling
    > up to them, and I won't even have to unclip from the pedals. What's wrong with the lights in
    > Tennessee that they can't spot a motorcycle?

    Around here, some do, some don't. I don't have a problem with this law given that it requires a stop
    and then, they can only go when it's safe. I do this on my bike sometimes, particularly in left turn
    lanes the sensor won't trip from the metal in my bike.

    I'm a little suprised that motorcycles don't trip a lot of them. They still have that big metal
    engine in them; even if they have a lot of carbon fiber and such for the frame etc.
     
  8. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...

    ...

    > I'm a little suprised that motorcycles don't trip a lot of them. They still have that big metal
    > engine in them; even if they have a lot of carbon fiber and such for the frame etc.

    A lot of the metal in a motorcycle is aluminum, which doesn't register as strongly as steel does.

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>, David Kerber <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    > ...
    >
    > > I'm a little suprised that motorcycles don't trip a lot of them. They still have that big metal
    > > engine in them; even if they have a lot of carbon fiber and such for the frame etc.

    Carbon fiber frames?? Are they letting GP250 prototype racers on the streets now?

    > A lot of the metal in a motorcycle is aluminum, which doesn't register as strongly as steel does.

    That, and the typical situation where a light doesn't respond to a motorcyclist is a left-turn slot,
    where the sensitivity has to be lower so the light won't be triggered by a dump truck in the next
    lane over.

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  10. Buck

    Buck Guest

    "Bill Davidson" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:Z_zEa.64751

    > I'm a little suprised that motorcycles don't trip a lot of them. They still have that big metal
    > engine in them; even if they have a lot of carbon fiber and such for the frame etc.

    Most carbon fiber on a motorcycle is restricted to unstressed parts like fairings, chainguards, etc.
    I have seen a few bikes with carbon fiber sub-frames (which support the seat and tail), but none
    with a real carbon fiber frame. Most carbon fiber in the motorcycling world is provided from the
    aftermarket.

    -Buck
     
  11. Budman

    Budman Guest

  12. Ray Heindl

    Ray Heindl Guest

    Chris B. <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Story at:
    >
    > http://www.ajc.com/news/content/news/0603/06redlight.html
    >
    > It seems that now those poor motorcyclists won't have to wait for an angelic cyclist to come along
    > and lay their bicycle down on the road or go and push the pedestrian button.

    You learn something new every day -- I always thought that aluminum was a metal, but according to
    this article it's not.

    --
    Ray Heindl (remove the X to reply)
     
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