Red meat cancer risk

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by [email protected], Feb 1, 2006.

  1. Red meat cancer risk clue found

    There are health concerns over red meat
    Eating lots of red meat is linked with DNA damage which raises the risk
    of bowel cancer, researchers suggest.
    Scientists at the Dunn Human Nutrition Unit and the Open University
    compared a red meat diet and a vegetarian diet.

    Their study, published in Cancer Research, found the red meat diet was
    associated with a higher level of DNA damage.

    Previous work suggests regular meat eaters are significantly more
    likely to develop bowel cancer.

    Almost 17,000 people die from the disease each year.

    Clues

    Last year the Dunn team published a study suggesting the chance of
    developing the disease was a third higher for people who regularly ate
    more than two portions per day of red meat compared with those who ate
    less than one portion per week.

    These combined discoveries ... may give us some clues about
    developing a screening test for very early changes related to the
    disease

    Professor David Shuker, Open University

    In the latest study the same Dunn team examined cells from the lining
    of the colon taken from healthy volunteers eating different diets.

    They found higher levels of DNA damage in the cells taken from people
    eating red meat.

    Work by the Open University team suggests the reason could be the
    presence of substances called N-nitrosocompounds, which form in the
    large bowel after eating red meat.

    Their work suggests that these compounds combine with DNA, and alter it
    so that it is more likely to undergo harmful changes or mutations that
    increase the likelihood of cancer

    Professor David Shuker, head of the Open University team, said: "These
    combined discoveries have allowed us to link red meat consumption to an
    increased risk of bowel cancer and may give us some clues about
    developing a screening test for very early changes related to the
    disease."

    'Moderation is key'

    Professor Colin Blakemore, chief executive of the Medical Research
    Council, which funded the research, said: "Large bowel cancer is the
    second most common cancer in western countries and nearly one million
    cases occur each year worldwide.

    "This latest study, together with the compelling epidemiological
    evidence published last year, is an important step towards
    understanding, and potentially preventing this common disease."

    A spokesman for the charity Beating Bowel Cancer said: "The fact is a
    third of all cancers are linked to what we eat and we must not
    underestimate the importance of a well-balanced diet in the prevention
    of bowel cancer.

    "This study certainly seems to add further weight to previous evidence
    about the possible link between bowel cancer and a high consumption of
    red meat.

    "As with all dietary advice, moderation is key as we already know that
    a diet high in fat and red meat yet low in fibre, fruit and vegetables
    can increase the risk of developing this disease - currently the second
    biggest cause of cancer death in the UK."

    Professor Annie Anderson, expert advisor to Bowel Cancer UK, said: "The
    new data not only provides further evidence of risk but also flags the
    importance of what we eat with our meat - for example, there is further
    risk with low fibre intakes.

    "Current data on eating trends suggests we are eating more fast foods,
    which we know are high in calories and fat and implicated as a cause of
    obesity and diabetes, but such cuisine may also be the very type of
    meals (high in meat - and meat products - and low in vegetables) that
    also contributes to bowel cancer risk."

    But a spokesman for the Meat and Livestock Commission said: "The
    results of this very small-scale study merely suggest a mechanism by
    which red and processed meat might possibly increase an individual's
    risk of developing colorectal cancer.

    "The authors themselves acknowledge that larger-scale, prospective
    studies are needed to identify how important and robust this suggested
    mechanism could be."

    Who loves ya.
    Tom

    Jesus Was A Vegetarian!
    http://jesuswasavegetarian.7h.com

    Man Is A Herbivore!
    http://pages.ivillage.com/ironjustice/manisaherbivore

    DEAD PEOPLE WALKING
    http://pages.ivillage.com/ironjustice/deadpeoplewalking
     
    Tags:


  2. vernon

    vernon Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Red meat cancer risk clue found
    >
    > There are health concerns over red meat
    > Eating lots of red meat is linked with DNA damage which raises the risk
    > of bowel cancer, researchers suggest.



    SUGGEST?

    EVERY real study has proved the opposite.

    The next installment will be, the definition of "lots" of red meat will be a
    pound a day of raw meat.
     
  3. FYI

    "Red meat 'linked to cancer risk'", BBC News, June 15, 2005,
    Link: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/4088824.stm

    A major study has found fresh evidence of a link between red and
    processed meat and bowel cancer, scientists say.

    The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)
    looked at the dietary habits of over 500,000 people across Europe over
    10 years.

    Bowel cancer risk was a third higher for those who regularly ate over
    two 80g portions of red or processed meat a day, compared to less than
    one a week.

    EPIC's study is reported in the Journal of the National Cancer
    Institute.

    Since it began, 1,330 people have developed bowel cancer.

    The study also found a low fibre diet increased the risk of bowel
    cancer.

    Eating poultry had no impact but the risk for people who ate one
    portion or more of fish every other day was nearly a third lower than
    those who ate fish less than once a week.

    Strong evidence

    Lead researcher Professor Sheila Bingham, of the MRC Dunn Human
    Nutrition Unit in Cambridge, said: "People have suspected for some time
    that high levels of red and processed meat increase risk of bowel
    cancer, but this is one of the largest studies worldwide and the first
    from Europe of this type to show a strong relationship."

    Professor Bingham said there were several theories about why red meat
    should increase the risk of bowel cancer.

    She believes the most likely explanation is that compounds called
    haemoglobin and myoglobin, which are found in red meat, trigger a
    process called nitrosation in the gut, which leads to the formation of
    carcinogenic compounds.

    Alternatively, the problem might be caused by compounds called
    heterocyclic amines, carcinogenic compounds created in the cooking
    process.

    However, these compounds are also found in poultry, which has not been
    linked to an increased cancer risk.

    Professor Tim Key, of the charity Cancer Research UK, said: "This study
    strengthens evidence that bowel cancer risk can be cut by increasing
    fibre in the diet and reducing consumption of red and processed meat."

    The researchers defined red meat as beef, lamb, pork and veal.

    Processed meat was mostly pork and beef that were preserved by methods
    other than freezing. They include ham, bacon, sausages, liver pate,
    salami, tinned meat, luncheon meat and corned beef.

    The Meat and Livestock Commission (MLC) said people in Britain ate well
    below the 160g per day consumption levels that were used to class high
    intake in the study.

    Mike Attenborough, MLC technical director, said: "Once again this
    points towards the need for moderation and balance in what we eat."

    The study was funded by the Medical Research Council, Cancer Research
    UK and the International Agency for Research on Cancer.
     
  4. vernon

    vernon Guest

    "Roman Bystrianyk" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > FYI
    >
    > "Red meat 'linked to cancer risk'", BBC News, June 15, 2005,
    > Link: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/4088824.stm
    >
    > A major study has found fresh evidence of a link between red and
    > processed meat and bowel cancer, scientists say.


    Garbage research.
    Total 100% garbage with an agenda.

    They just hint at the REAL culprit, low fiber.
     
  5. On 1 Feb 2006 02:28:53 -0800, "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Red meat cancer risk clue found
    >
    >There are health concerns over red meat
    >Eating lots of red meat is linked with DNA damage which raises the risk
    >of bowel cancer, researchers suggest.
    >Scientists at the Dunn Human Nutrition Unit and the Open University
    >compared a red meat diet and a vegetarian diet.
    >
    >Their study, published in Cancer Research, found the red meat diet was
    >associated with a higher level of DNA damage.
    >
    >Previous work suggests regular meat eaters are significantly more
    >likely to develop bowel cancer.
    >
    >Almost 17,000 people die from the disease each year.
    >
    >Clues
    >
    >Last year the Dunn team published a study suggesting the chance of
    >developing the disease was a third higher for people who regularly ate
    >more than two portions per day of red meat compared with those who ate
    >less than one portion per week.
    >
    > These combined discoveries ... may give us some clues about
    >developing a screening test for very early changes related to the
    >disease
    >
    >Professor David Shuker, Open University
    >
    >In the latest study the same Dunn team examined cells from the lining
    >of the colon taken from healthy volunteers eating different diets.
    >
    >They found higher levels of DNA damage in the cells taken from people
    >eating red meat.
    >
    >Work by the Open University team suggests the reason could be the
    >presence of substances called N-nitrosocompounds, which form in the
    >large bowel after eating red meat.
    >
    >Their work suggests that these compounds combine with DNA, and alter it
    >so that it is more likely to undergo harmful changes or mutations that
    >increase the likelihood of cancer
    >
    >Professor David Shuker, head of the Open University team, said: "These
    >combined discoveries have allowed us to link red meat consumption to an
    >increased risk of bowel cancer and may give us some clues about
    >developing a screening test for very early changes related to the
    >disease."
    >
    >'Moderation is key'
    >
    >Professor Colin Blakemore, chief executive of the Medical Research
    >Council, which funded the research, said: "Large bowel cancer is the
    >second most common cancer in western countries and nearly one million
    >cases occur each year worldwide.
    >
    >"This latest study, together with the compelling epidemiological
    >evidence published last year, is an important step towards
    >understanding, and potentially preventing this common disease."
    >
    >A spokesman for the charity Beating Bowel Cancer said: "The fact is a
    >third of all cancers are linked to what we eat and we must not
    >underestimate the importance of a well-balanced diet in the prevention
    >of bowel cancer.
    >
    >"This study certainly seems to add further weight to previous evidence
    >about the possible link between bowel cancer and a high consumption of
    >red meat.
    >
    >"As with all dietary advice, moderation is key as we already know that
    >a diet high in fat and red meat yet low in fibre, fruit and vegetables
    >can increase the risk of developing this disease - currently the second
    >biggest cause of cancer death in the UK."
    >
    >Professor Annie Anderson, expert advisor to Bowel Cancer UK, said: "The
    >new data not only provides further evidence of risk but also flags the
    >importance of what we eat with our meat - for example, there is further
    >risk with low fibre intakes.
    >
    >"Current data on eating trends suggests we are eating more fast foods,
    >which we know are high in calories and fat and implicated as a cause of
    >obesity and diabetes, but such cuisine may also be the very type of
    >meals (high in meat - and meat products - and low in vegetables) that
    >also contributes to bowel cancer risk."
    >
    >But a spokesman for the Meat and Livestock Commission said: "The
    >results of this very small-scale study merely suggest a mechanism by
    >which red and processed meat might possibly increase an individual's
    >risk of developing colorectal cancer.
    >
    >"The authors themselves acknowledge that larger-scale, prospective
    >studies are needed to identify how important and robust this suggested
    >mechanism could be."
    >
    >Who loves ya.
    >Tom
    >


    Junk results from research. Where is the link?

    Ora
     
  6. J

    J Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > Junk results from research. Where is the link?


    Ora, did you really have to quote all the text (again)?
    Many of us are trying to filter his posts and we can't do that if you keep replying
    and crossposting.
    Or watch the headers and trim out the cancer newsgroups. - please and thank you.
    J
    2 newsgroups trimmed
     
  7. clifto

    clifto Guest

    Roman Bystrianyk wrote:
    > The Meat and Livestock Commission (MLC) said people in Britain ate well
    > below the 160g per day consumption levels that were used to class high
    > intake in the study.


    !!! 160g? High intake?! I feel like I'm broke any time I can't afford to
    get more than that in every *meal*.

    > Mike Attenborough, MLC technical director, said: "Once again this
    > points towards the need for moderation and balance in what we eat."


    Damn. Remind me not to walk too close to the meat counter next time.

    --
    If John McCain gets the 2008 Republican Presidential nomination,
    my vote for President will be a write-in for Jiang Zemin.
     
  8. TC

    TC Guest

    clifto wrote:
    > Roman Bystrianyk wrote:
    > > The Meat and Livestock Commission (MLC) said people in Britain ate well
    > > below the 160g per day consumption levels that were used to class high
    > > intake in the study.

    >
    > !!! 160g? High intake?! I feel like I'm broke any time I can't afford to
    > get more than that in every *meal*.
    >
    > > Mike Attenborough, MLC technical director, said: "Once again this
    > > points towards the need for moderation and balance in what we eat."

    >
    > Damn. Remind me not to walk too close to the meat counter next time.
    >
    > --
    > If John McCain gets the 2008 Republican Presidential nomination,
    > my vote for President will be a write-in for Jiang Zemin.


    On even the most zealous low carb diet it would be difficult to eat
    more than 100 to 110 grams per day. That is the high end. That is a lot
    of meat.

    I can see how 160g might cause problems. I challenge anyone to find
    stats of any group of people that eat that much protein. My guess is
    that very very few people could sustain or would want to sustain that
    kind of protein consumption.

    TC
     
  9. Jim Prescott

    Jim Prescott Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    TC <[email protected]> wrote:
    >clifto wrote:
    >> Roman Bystrianyk wrote:
    >> > The Meat and Livestock Commission (MLC) said people in Britain ate well
    >> > below the 160g per day consumption levels that were used to class high
    >> > intake in the study.

    >> !!! 160g? High intake?! I feel like I'm broke any time I can't afford to
    >> get more than that in every *meal*.

    >On even the most zealous low carb diet it would be difficult to eat
    >more than 100 to 110 grams per day. That is the high end. That is a lot
    >of meat.


    Check your math. 80g ~= 3oz ~= 1 serving of meat. Even someone following
    the food pyramid would be getting 160g of meat a day. Someone on LC, or
    a typical American not watching what they eat, will probably have more
    than that.

    Perhaps you are thinking of protein. Like most foods, meat is mostly
    water. A 295g trimmed ribye steak is only about 64g protein (58% water,
    27% protein, 15% fat for "Beef, rib eye, small end (ribs 10-12), separable
    lean and fat, trimmed to 0" fat, all grades, cooked, broiled" at:
    http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/cgi-bin/nut_search.pl
    --
    Jim Prescott - Computing and Networking Group [email protected]
    School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, University of Rochester, NY
     
  10. I am sick and tired of scientists coming out with conflicting theories about
    the causes of Cancer.

    Red meat is a cure to Phalloidins which binds to actin filaments in the
    body. The only thing is whenever you want to eat red meat, make sure it is
    well cooked. Probably you might have to boil it for hours before eating it.

    Just eat what you want and remember as a man thinks in his heart, so he
    becomes.

    Daniel Badu-Asmah
    (Cancer Research Student)
     
  11. clifto

    clifto Guest

    Daniel Badu-Asmah wrote:
    > Just eat what you want and remember as a man thinks in his heart, so he
    > becomes.


    Well, if you are what you eat, I'm a vegetarian because cows are vegetation.

    --
    If John McCain gets the 2008 Republican Presidential nomination,
    my vote for President will be a write-in for Jiang Zemin.
     
  12. vernon

    vernon Guest

    "clifto" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Daniel Badu-Asmah wrote:
    >> Just eat what you want and remember as a man thinks in his heart, so he
    >> becomes.

    >
    > Well, if you are what you eat, I'm a vegetarian because cows are
    > vegetation.


    You will have the life span of a cow.

    >
    > --
    > If John McCain gets the 2008 Republican Presidential nomination,
    > my vote for President will be a write-in for Jiang Zemin.
     
  13. vernon

    vernon Guest

    "Daniel Badu-Asmah" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I am sick and tired of scientists coming out with conflicting theories
    >about the causes of Cancer.
    >
    > Red meat is a cure to Phalloidins which binds to actin filaments in the
    > body. The only thing is whenever you want to eat red meat, make sure it is
    > well cooked. Probably you might have to boil it for hours before eating
    > it.


    Hours?
    Have you ever learned the temperature that all life dies.

    >
    > Just eat what you want and remember as a man thinks in his heart, so he
    > becomes.
    >
    > Daniel Badu-Asmah
    > (Cancer Research Student)
    >
     
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