Reduced Carb and Cal Diet Slows Progression of Alzheimer's (in LabMice)

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by jbuch, Jan 12, 2005.

  1. jbuch

    jbuch Guest

    Reduced calorie and carbohydrate diet slows progression of Alzheimer's
    disease in mouse model


    Public release date: 12-Jan-2005


    Contact: Mount Sinai Press Office
    [email protected]
    212-241-9200
    Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine


    A Mount Sinai School of Medicine led study is the first to suggest that
    Alzheimer's disease may be slowed and possibly prevented through dietary
    changes
    Researchers found that a low carbohydrate diet that reduced total
    caloric intake by 30% prevented the development of a fundamental feature
    of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in mice genetically engineered to develop
    the disease. The diet eliminated amyloid plaque development, which is
    the underlying pathology in AD. The study, published in the February
    issue of The FASEB Journal Express, is the first to demonstrate that a
    change in diet can slow and possibly prevent Alzheimer's diseases.

    "While it is far too early for us to make specific recommendations for
    human diets," said Giulio Maria Pasinetti, MD, PhD, Professor of
    Psychiatry, Neurosciences and Geriatrics and Adult Development at Mount
    Sinai School of Medicine and primary investigator on the study, "these
    findings provide the first solid evidence that dietary changes may
    provide a new approach to treatment and prevention of this devastating
    disease."

    Dr. Pasinetti and his colleagues found that mice did not develop the
    physiological markers of the disease when they were fed a reduced
    carbohydrate diet that provided 70% of the calories eaten by similar
    mice who were allowed to eat ad-libitum. The strain of mice used in the
    study was genetically engineered to produce what are known as
    amyloidogenic â-amyloid peptides in the brain, resulting in formation of
    amyloid plaques which are known to be the fundamental problem in
    Alzheimer' disease. Of the mice fed ad-libitum, 100% developed these
    plaques. No plaque development was detected in the mice fed a
    carbohydrate and calorie restricted diet.

    The diet regimen was begun when the mice were 3-months old, which is
    considered young adult and is prior to the age at when this Alzheimer's
    disease mouse model begins to develop plaques in the brain. The presence
    of plaques was evaluated at 12 months of age, which is an age at which
    plaques are known to be well developed in this strain.

    The investigators found that anti-amyloidogenic activities were
    increased in mice fed the restricted diet. In other words, the calorie
    restricted diet activated pathways that break down amyloidogenic
    â-amyloid peptides in the brain before they form the plaques
    characteristic of AD.

    "Since the diet only reduced calories by 30%, (based on carbohydrate)
    the mice developed normally," said Dr. Pasinetti. "While they did not
    gain weight like the mice in the control group, they did not loose
    weight either and remained within the boundaries considered a healthy
    weight. Nonetheless, this rather mild change in diet resulted in a
    remarkable measure of disease prevention. There is epidemiological
    evidence that humans who consume reduced calorie diets have a lower
    incidence of AD. Our investigation provides a possible rational for this
    observation and possible mechanisms through which caloric reduction may
    provide protection in Alzheimer's disease."

    Ongoing studies are investigating whether or not the prevention of
    plaque development in these mice also prevents behavioral decline and
    clinical studies are currently being designed at Mount Sinai School of
    Medicine to explore the applicability of this experimental evidence in
    Alzheimer's disease cases.

    ###
     
    Tags:


  2. Bob M

    Bob M Guest

    OK, I just don't get it. They change two variables (calories AND
    carbohydrates). Why? Why not include another group that had low calories
    but normal carbohydrate? And maybe a fourth group that had normal
    calories but low carbohydrate. Instead of knowing whether it's reduction
    of calories alone or reduction of carbohydrates alone, we only "know" that
    it takes both calorie and carb reduction.


    On Wed, 12 Jan 2005 18:21:35 -0600, jbuch <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Reduced calorie and carbohydrate diet slows progression of Alzheimer's
    > disease in mouse model
    >
    >
    > Public release date: 12-Jan-2005
    >
    >
    > Contact: Mount Sinai Press Office
    > [email protected]
    > 212-241-9200
    > Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine
    >
    >
    > A Mount Sinai School of Medicine led study is the first to suggest that
    > Alzheimer's disease may be slowed and possibly prevented through dietary
    > changes
    > Researchers found that a low carbohydrate diet that reduced total
    > caloric intake by 30% prevented the development of a fundamental feature
    > of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in mice genetically engineered to develop
    > the disease. The diet eliminated amyloid plaque development, which is
    > the underlying pathology in AD. The study, published in the February
    > issue of The FASEB Journal Express, is the first to demonstrate that a
    > change in diet can slow and possibly prevent Alzheimer's diseases.
    >
    > "While it is far too early for us to make specific recommendations for
    > human diets," said Giulio Maria Pasinetti, MD, PhD, Professor of
    > Psychiatry, Neurosciences and Geriatrics and Adult Development at Mount
    > Sinai School of Medicine and primary investigator on the study, "these
    > findings provide the first solid evidence that dietary changes may
    > provide a new approach to treatment and prevention of this devastating
    > disease."
    >
    > Dr. Pasinetti and his colleagues found that mice did not develop the
    > physiological markers of the disease when they were fed a reduced
    > carbohydrate diet that provided 70% of the calories eaten by similar
    > mice who were allowed to eat ad-libitum. The strain of mice used in the
    > study was genetically engineered to produce what are known as
    > amyloidogenic â-amyloid peptides in the brain, resulting in formation of
    > amyloid plaques which are known to be the fundamental problem in
    > Alzheimer' disease. Of the mice fed ad-libitum, 100% developed these
    > plaques. No plaque development was detected in the mice fed a
    > carbohydrate and calorie restricted diet.
    >
    > The diet regimen was begun when the mice were 3-months old, which is
    > considered young adult and is prior to the age at when this Alzheimer's
    > disease mouse model begins to develop plaques in the brain. The presence
    > of plaques was evaluated at 12 months of age, which is an age at which
    > plaques are known to be well developed in this strain.
    >
    > The investigators found that anti-amyloidogenic activities were
    > increased in mice fed the restricted diet. In other words, the calorie
    > restricted diet activated pathways that break down amyloidogenic
    > â-amyloid peptides in the brain before they form the plaques
    > characteristic of AD.
    >
    > "Since the diet only reduced calories by 30%, (based on carbohydrate)
    > the mice developed normally," said Dr. Pasinetti. "While they did not
    > gain weight like the mice in the control group, they did not loose
    > weight either and remained within the boundaries considered a healthy
    > weight. Nonetheless, this rather mild change in diet resulted in a
    > remarkable measure of disease prevention. There is epidemiological
    > evidence that humans who consume reduced calorie diets have a lower
    > incidence of AD. Our investigation provides a possible rational for this
    > observation and possible mechanisms through which caloric reduction may
    > provide protection in Alzheimer's disease."
    >
    > Ongoing studies are investigating whether or not the prevention of
    > plaque development in these mice also prevents behavioral decline and
    > clinical studies are currently being designed at Mount Sinai School of
    > Medicine to explore the applicability of this experimental evidence in
    > Alzheimer's disease cases.
    >
    > ###
    >
    >




    --
    Bob in CT
     
  3. jbuch

    jbuch Guest

    Bob M wrote:
    > OK, I just don't get it. They change two variables (calories AND
    > carbohydrates). Why? Why not include another group that had low
    > calories but normal carbohydrate? And maybe a fourth group that had
    > normal calories but low carbohydrate. Instead of knowing whether it's
    > reduction of calories alone or reduction of carbohydrates alone, we
    > only "know" that it takes both calorie and carb reduction.
    >

    They made ONE dietary change...

    They reduced calories by 25% and all of that reduction came from
    CARBOHYDRATES.

    Cut Carbs 25% ...

    That's all they did.

    This was described in the article.

    You should ask the authors all of your "WHY" questins.

    Think BUDGET?
     
  4. Bob M

    Bob M Guest

    On Thu, 13 Jan 2005 09:03:37 -0600, jbuch <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Bob M wrote:
    >> OK, I just don't get it. They change two variables (calories AND
    >> carbohydrates). Why? Why not include another group that had low
    >> calories but normal carbohydrate? And maybe a fourth group that had
    >> normal calories but low carbohydrate. Instead of knowing whether it's
    >> reduction of calories alone or reduction of carbohydrates alone, we
    >> only "know" that it takes both calorie and carb reduction.
    >>

    > They made ONE dietary change...
    >
    > They reduced calories by 25% and all of that reduction came from
    > CARBOHYDRATES.
    >
    > Cut Carbs 25% ...
    >
    > That's all they did.
    >
    > This was described in the article.
    >
    > You should ask the authors all of your "WHY" questins.
    >
    > Think BUDGET?
    >


    But if you cut just carbs by 25% and don't replace them, you've made two
    changes -- carbs AND calories. I did think budget, but studies like these
    bring up more questions than they answer, and if they just did a better
    job in the beginning, they could determine whether it was carbs and
    calories or only one of these.

    --
    Bob in CT
     
  5. jbuch

    jbuch Guest

    Bob M wrote:

    > On Thu, 13 Jan 2005 09:03:37 -0600, jbuch <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Bob M wrote:
    >>
    >>> OK, I just don't get it. They change two variables (calories AND
    >>> carbohydrates). Why? Why not include another group that had low
    >>> calories but normal carbohydrate? And maybe a fourth group that
    >>> had normal calories but low carbohydrate. Instead of knowing
    >>> whether it's reduction of calories alone or reduction of
    >>> carbohydrates alone, we only "know" that it takes both calorie and
    >>> carb reduction.
    >>>

    >> They made ONE dietary change...
    >>
    >> They reduced calories by 25% and all of that reduction came from
    >> CARBOHYDRATES.
    >>
    >> Cut Carbs 25% ...
    >>
    >> That's all they did.
    >>
    >> This was described in the article.
    >>
    >> You should ask the authors all of your "WHY" questins.
    >>
    >> Think BUDGET?
    >>

    >
    > But if you cut just carbs by 25% and don't replace them, you've made
    > two changes -- carbs AND calories. I did think budget, but studies
    > like these bring up more questions than they answer, and if they just
    > did a better job in the beginning, they could determine whether it was
    > carbs and calories or only one of these.
    >


    Think BUDGET and FUNDING.

    This preliminary study would be a great basis for getting a research
    grant and funding for a more definitive study.....

    And the limited preliminary study strongly indicates that the larger
    study will show postive results on identifying _something_ that
    correlates with slower progression of Alzheimer's disease.

    There are many reasons to publish preliminary studies..... and future
    funding is one of the many reasons.

    Have you ever earned your living in a funded research environment?

    You would understand the origin of the term "Publish Or Perish".

    --
    ................................


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