Reduced Road Vibration with carbon forks?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Dave, Apr 30, 2006.

  1. Dave

    Dave Guest

    I bought a Time Vectran Carbon Fork for my Cannondale road machine. Do these
    reduce road vibration? I will have to do alot of changes for this to work on
    this bike, and would like to know before I throw a bunch of money into it.
    Thanks in advance,
    Dave
     
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  2. On Mon, 01 May 2006 04:40:48 +0000, Dave wrote:

    > I bought a Time Vectran Carbon Fork for my Cannondale road machine. Do these
    > reduce road vibration? I will have to do alot of changes for this to work on
    > this bike, and would like to know before I throw a bunch of money into it.


    No, it won't. The vibration is most effectively damped by the tires, and
    any damping of the wheels, frame, or fork is significantly less than from
    the tires. You want a smoother ride? Let some air out of your tires. If
    that makes them prone to pinch flats, get wider tires.

    But since you already spent the money, why not use the fork? How many
    more things will you need? That depends on the headset type (and if the
    new fork is not the same). I can see examples where there is nothing else
    to buy, and others where you need to replace the stem and headset, but the
    fork is by far the most expensive of the lot, and you did that already.

    Most often, getting a carbon fork to replace a metal fork will make the
    bike slightly lighter. If the original fork is steel, the difference in
    weight might be more significant.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Enron's slogan: Respect, Communication, Integrity, and
    _`\(,_ | Excellence.
    (_)/ (_) |
     
  3. Dave

    Dave Guest

    Thanks for the help David. Will the Carbon Fork help with bumpy roads
    absorbing some of the shock? I do some high speed 35 to 40 mile runs in the
    country on it and the roads have many bumps and chuckholes in them.
    Dave

    "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    > On Mon, 01 May 2006 04:40:48 +0000, Dave wrote:
    >
    > > I bought a Time Vectran Carbon Fork for my Cannondale road machine. Do

    these
    > > reduce road vibration? I will have to do alot of changes for this to

    work on
    > > this bike, and would like to know before I throw a bunch of money into

    it.
    >
    > No, it won't. The vibration is most effectively damped by the tires, and
    > any damping of the wheels, frame, or fork is significantly less than from
    > the tires. You want a smoother ride? Let some air out of your tires. If
    > that makes them prone to pinch flats, get wider tires.
    >
    > But since you already spent the money, why not use the fork? How many
    > more things will you need? That depends on the headset type (and if the
    > new fork is not the same). I can see examples where there is nothing else
    > to buy, and others where you need to replace the stem and headset, but the
    > fork is by far the most expensive of the lot, and you did that already.
    >
    > Most often, getting a carbon fork to replace a metal fork will make the
    > bike slightly lighter. If the original fork is steel, the difference in
    > weight might be more significant.
    >
    > --
    >
    > David L. Johnson
    >
    > __o | Enron's slogan: Respect, Communication, Integrity, and
    > _`\(,_ | Excellence.
    > (_)/ (_) |
    >
    >
     
  4. bfd

    bfd Guest

    "Dave" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Thanks for the help David. Will the Carbon Fork help with bumpy roads
    > absorbing some of the shock? I do some high speed 35 to 40 mile runs in

    the
    > country on it and the roads have many bumps and chuckholes in them.
    > Dave
    >

    Hey top poster, REREAD Dave's note:

    "The vibration is *most effectively damped by the tires*, and
    any damping of the wheels, frame, or fork is significantly less than from
    the tires. *You want a smoother ride?* Let some air out of your tires. If
    that makes them prone to pinch flats, *get wider tires*." (emphasis added).

    Or translated "the most effective vibration dampening are tires." "IF you
    want a smoother ride, get wider tires"

    On the flip side, IF what you really want is a carbon fork, then just get
    it. It ain't gonna do as much as wider tires, but what the heck, a carbon
    fork has alot more sex appeal than say 25 or 28 mm wide tires. I say, get
    the carbon fork, some 700x25 or 28mm wide tires, and RIDE!


    > "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:p[email protected]
    > > On Mon, 01 May 2006 04:40:48 +0000, Dave wrote:
    > >
    > > > I bought a Time Vectran Carbon Fork for my Cannondale road machine. Do

    > these
    > > > reduce road vibration? I will have to do alot of changes for this to

    > work on
    > > > this bike, and would like to know before I throw a bunch of money into

    > it.
    > >
    > > No, it won't. The vibration is most effectively damped by the tires,

    and
    > > any damping of the wheels, frame, or fork is significantly less than

    from
    > > the tires. You want a smoother ride? Let some air out of your tires.

    If
    > > that makes them prone to pinch flats, get wider tires.
    > >
    > > But since you already spent the money, why not use the fork? How many
    > > more things will you need? That depends on the headset type (and if the
    > > new fork is not the same). I can see examples where there is nothing

    else
    > > to buy, and others where you need to replace the stem and headset, but

    the
    > > fork is by far the most expensive of the lot, and you did that already.
    > >
    > > Most often, getting a carbon fork to replace a metal fork will make the
    > > bike slightly lighter. If the original fork is steel, the difference in
    > > weight might be more significant.
    > >
    > > --
    > >
    > > David L. Johnson
    > >
    > > __o | Enron's slogan: Respect, Communication, Integrity, and
    > > _`\(,_ | Excellence.
    > > (_)/ (_) |
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
  5. catzz66

    catzz66 Guest

    Dave wrote:
    > Thanks for the help David. Will the Carbon Fork help with bumpy roads
    > absorbing some of the shock? I do some high speed 35 to 40 mile runs in the
    > country on it and the roads have many bumps and chuckholes in them.
    > Dave
    >


    I wouldn't count on it. I don't see how the construction of carbon
    forks would allow for it, anyway. I ride on chip seal roads quite a lot
    and my carbon fork does not absorb the vibration. If anything, I have
    had to learn to ride more loose on this bike than my old one.
     
  6. On Tue, 02 May 2006 03:49:32 +0000, Dave wrote:

    > Thanks for the help David. Will the Carbon Fork help with bumpy roads
    > absorbing some of the shock? I do some high speed 35 to 40 mile runs in the
    > country on it and the roads have many bumps and chuckholes in them.


    No. (Non-suspension) Forks are very rigid -- they have to be, or they
    would break.

    People seem to have a need to justify the expense of a carbon fork, by
    giving it magical powers. It cannot both smooth out the ride and last
    through years of abuse. Personally, I'll take the durability. They do
    not eliminate vibration, or absorb shock, or make you faster. They hold
    on to the front wheel, and a carbon fork does this well at a lighter mass
    than steel (by as much as a pound). The weight difference between carbon
    and aluminum is smaller, but still carbon is lighter.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | I believe that the motion picture is destined to revolutionize
    _`\(,_ | our educational system and that in a few years it will supplant
    (_)/ (_) | largely, if not entirely, the use of textbooks -- Thomas
    Edison, 1922
     
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