Refitting tyres

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Stainlesssteelr, Apr 13, 2003.

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  1. OK, dumb question. Tyre forks are great for removing tyres, but does anyone have any device or
    method they use when refitting the tyre? I find the tyre (not the tube obviously) is constantly
    unpeeling itself, and requires at least three arms to hold the thing in place. It would be great if
    there was some type of tyre fork that could be used to hold the tyre in place as well.

    Ideas?

    --
    StainlessSteelRat Richter: You have to make a decision, sir. Vilos Cohaagen: Kill him. Richter: It's
    about goddamn time.
     
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  2. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    In a brief moment of lucidity StainlessSteelRat scribbled:

    > OK, dumb question. Tyre forks are great for removing tyres, but does anyone have any device or
    > method they use when refitting the tyre? I find the tyre (not the tube obviously) is constantly
    > unpeeling itself, and requires at least three arms to hold the thing in place. It would be great
    > if there was some type of tyre fork that could be used to hold the tyre in place as well.
    >
    > Ideas?

    Never had trouble just rolling the tyres back on by hand. Just make sure the tyre already fitted
    sits in the centre of the rim, not on the edges.

    --

    Completed 1592 Seti work units in 12190 hours http://setiathome.ssl.berkeley.edu/
     
  3. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    StainlessSteelRat <[email protected]> wrote:
    > OK, dumb question. Tyre forks are great for removing tyres, but does anyone have any device or
    > method they use when refitting the tyre? I find the tyre (not the tube obviously) is constantly
    > unpeeling itself, and requires at least three arms to hold the thing in place. It would be great
    > if there was some type of tyre fork that could be used to hold the tyre in place as well.
    >

    Start by the valve and use your two hands to work away from it on both sides. As you get near the
    far side and it gets harder, use one hand to go back and squeeze the tyre into the centre well of
    the rim to free up a bit more slack. Tyres go on in a few seconds with just fingers and thumbs.

    Tony

    --
    http://www.raven-family.com

    "The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable man persists in trying to
    adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man." -- George
    Bernard Shaw
     
  4. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    StainlessSteelRat wrote:
    > OK, dumb question. Tyre forks are great for removing tyres, but does anyone have any device or
    > method they use when refitting the tyre? I find the tyre (not the tube obviously) is constantly
    > unpeeling itself, and requires at least three arms to hold the thing in place. It would be great
    > if there was some type of tyre fork that could be used to hold the tyre in place as well.

    It's down to method rather than tools. Some tyre and rim combinations are more awkward than others;
    I suspect you've got particularly "baggy"-fitting tyres. I know it's annoying when the bead keeps
    popping back out, but just persevere with it (sometimes you have to go round and round a few times
    before it works out), and brush up on your technique...........

    Using no tools, fit one bead of the tyre, insert inner tube, inflate tube so it's just rounded out
    (or perhaps a bit more with your tyres), use both hands at once to push bead in. Aim to finish at
    the valve, and ensure valve is pushed up into the tyre.

    The key will be the amount of air in the tube (adjust as you go if that will help) and distance
    between hands.

    Anyway, be grateful that you haven't got the opposite problem of b****rd-tight tyres :) ...which
    are much nastier to deal with.

    ~PB
     
  5. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    "StainlessSteelRat" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > OK, dumb question. Tyre forks are great for removing tyres, but does
    anyone
    > have any device or method they use when refitting the tyre? I find the
    tyre
    > (not the tube obviously) is constantly unpeeling itself, and requires at least three arms to hold
    > the thing in place. It would be great if there
    was
    > some type of tyre fork that could be used to hold the tyre in place as
    well.

    I've had this problem with certain tyres. I wound some plastic tape around the tyre and rim to keep
    it in place until it all went on.

    --
    Simon Mason Anlaby East Yorkshire. 53°44'N 0°26'W http://www.simonmason.karoo.net
     
  6. Tony R

    Tony R Guest

    "Pete Biggs" <pLime{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    >
    > Anyway, be grateful that you haven't got the opposite problem of b****rd-tight tyres :) ...which
    > are much nastier to deal with.
    >
    > ~PB
    >
    I've always found my tyres nastily tight (Top Touring and then Top Touring
    2000) but rarely suffer punctures so rarely experience the nastiness. Once they're on I've always
    pumped them up as hard as I can, contributing to rareness of punctures I assume. I recently
    borrowed a wee pressure gauge and was/am slightly concerned when the needle flew round to
    110psi (the gauge's maximum point). The tyres are rated to 75psi. Am I risking terrible things
    by this malpractice? Given I've been riding around like this for years presumably the risk is
    a small one, or I'm using up all my luck. Perhaps the tyres' ability to take this abuse is
    related to their b*****d-tightness? I was thinking of switching to Schwalbe Marathons next
    time. Anyone know if they'll take similar over-inflation? Thanks, Tony R.
     
  7. Simon Hay

    Simon Hay Guest

    tony R wrote:

    > I was thinking of switching to Schwalbe Marathons next time. Anyone know if they'll take similar
    > over-inflation?

    Not sure you'd really need to over-inflate them - IIRC, mine are rated to 100 or 105 psi...

    Simon
     
  8. Velvet

    Velvet Guest

    "tony R" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Pete Biggs" <pLime{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    > >
    > > Anyway, be grateful that you haven't got the opposite problem of b****rd-tight tyres :)
    > > ...which are much nastier to deal with.
    > >
    > > ~PB
    > >
    > I've always found my tyres nastily tight (Top Touring and then Top Touring
    > 2000) but rarely suffer punctures so rarely experience the nastiness. Once they're on I've always
    > pumped them up as hard as I can, contributing to rareness of punctures I assume. I recently
    > borrowed a wee pressure gauge
    and
    > was/am slightly concerned when the needle flew round to 110psi (the
    gauge's
    > maximum point). The tyres are rated to 75psi. Am I risking terrible things by this malpractice?
    > Given I've been riding around like this for years presumably the risk is a small one, or I'm using
    > up all my luck. Perhaps the tyres' ability to take this abuse is related to their
    > b*****d-tightness? I was thinking of switching to Schwalbe Marathons next time. Anyone know
    if
    > they'll take similar over-inflation? Thanks, Tony R.
    >
    >

    Have Schwalbe blizzards on mine, and they're rated to 120, iirc. I have them at 110.

    Velvet
     
  9. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    tony R wrote:
    > I've always found my tyres nastily tight (Top Touring and then Top Touring 2000) but rarely suffer
    > punctures so rarely experience the nastiness. Once they're on I've always pumped them up as hard
    > as I can, contributing to rareness of punctures I assume.

    Firm tyres may be more puncture resistant than very soft ones, but I doubt rock-hard ones will help
    that much more in this respect.

    > I recently borrowed a wee pressure gauge and was/am slightly concerned when the needle flew round
    > to 110psi (the gauge's maximum point).

    First, need to be sure gauge is getting an proper reading by unsticking the valve first with a quick
    tap ...but then that'll release some air (as might using the gauge itself), thus reducing the
    pressure! (One reason why I don't bother using separate gauges).

    > The tyres are rated to 75psi. Am I risking terrible things by this malpractice?

    It's often reasonable to pump beyond the manufacturer's recommended limit*, but I think 110psi is
    probably OTT for these tyres. 90, maybe 95, would be a more reasonable max, unless, to be frank,
    your bike is carrying the equivilent collective weight of a large group of Chinese girls that have
    been over-indulging on hamburgers whilst rehearsing their circus act in the UK.

    Apart from providing a bumpy ride, an over inflated tyre will be more likely to get cut by stones
    and debris, and won't grip as well as a correctly inflated one.

    * See: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tyres.html#pressure

    > Given I've been riding around like this for years presumably the risk is a small one, or I'm using
    > up all my luck.

    Maybe, but you could go round the corners faster with softer tyres and have a more comfy ride
    in general.

    > Perhaps the tyres' ability to take this abuse is related to their b*****d-tightness?

    It would help them blowing off the rims - although probably even more pressure and/or some mountain
    descending with the brakes on would be required for that to happen.

    > I was thinking of switching to Schwalbe Marathons next time. Anyone know if they'll take similar
    > over-inflation?

    Don't know about Marathons, but like you, I used to have the habit of over-inflation, but I'm trying
    to get more sensible these days. As SB says, there /should/ be some bulge there when you look down.

    ~Pete "I don't do innuendo" Biggs
     
  10. Call Me Bob

    Call Me Bob Guest

    On Sun, 13 Apr 2003 19:47:37 +0100, "Pete Biggs" <pLime{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote:

    >As SB says, there /should/ be some bulge there when you look down.

    I can apply this maxim to my belly, yes?

    Bob
    --
    Mail address is spam trapped To reply by email remove the beverage
     
  11. Trealaw Boy

    Trealaw Boy Guest

    Try a Crank Bros Speed Lever. Its a nifty telescopic tyre lever that attached to the hub,
    essentially giving you an extra hand to work with. Good for both removing and refitting tyres. I
    think SJS are doing adeal on them right now.

    http://www.sjscycles.com/store/item7013.htm

    Regards

    TB

    StainlessSteelRat wrote:

    > OK, dumb question. Tyre forks are great for removing tyres, but does anyone have any device or
    > method they use when refitting the tyre? I find the tyre (not the tube obviously) is constantly
    > unpeeling itself, and requires at least three arms to hold the thing in place. It would be great
    > if there was some type of tyre fork that could be used to hold the tyre in place as well.
    >
    > Ideas?
    >
    > --
    > StainlessSteelRat Richter: You have to make a decision, sir. Vilos Cohaagen: Kill him. Richter:
    > It's about goddamn time.
     
  12. Tony R

    Tony R Guest

    "Pete Biggs" <pLime{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    >
    > Don't know about Marathons, but like you, I used to have the habit of over-inflation, but I'm
    > trying to get more sensible these days. As SB says, there /should/ be some bulge there when you
    > look down.
    >
    > ~Pete "I don't do innuendo" Biggs
    >
    After reading Sheldon's article have taken your advice and reduced pressure. I'm looking forward to
    a more noticeable bulge. Thanks, Tony "nor do I" R.
     
  13. Usenet

    Usenet Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, Trealaw Boy <[email protected]> writes
    >Try a Crank Bros Speed Lever. Its a nifty telescopic tyre lever that attached to the hub,
    >essentially giving you an extra hand to work with. Good for both removing and refitting tyres. I
    >think SJS are doing adeal on them right now.
    >
    >http://www.sjscycles.com/store/item7013.htm
    >

    Seconded. I have tight tyres and this is the only thing I've ever found to get the bead back on.
    Halfords sell 'em as well.

    And to all those people who write to say they've never had any problems refitting tyres - well, it's
    possible you're blessed with thumbs of steel but after half-an-hour of trying to get a tyre back on
    I'm normally weeping with frustration at my inability to achieve such a seemingly simple thing. Just
    stop telling people it's so damn simple, because it's NOT!

    --
    Martin @ Strawberry Hill
     
  14. Usenet wrote:
    >> Try a Crank Bros Speed Lever. Its a nifty telescopic tyre lever that attached to the hub,
    >> essentially giving you an extra hand to work with. Good for both removing and refitting tyres. I
    >> think SJS are doing adeal on them right now.
    >>
    >> http://www.sjscycles.com/store/item7013.htm
    >>
    >
    > Seconded. I have tight tyres and this is the only thing I've ever found to get the bead back on.
    > Halfords sell 'em as well.
    >
    > And to all those people who write to say they've never had any problems refitting tyres - well,
    > it's possible you're blessed with thumbs of steel but after half-an-hour of trying to get a tyre
    > back on I'm normally weeping with frustration at my inability to achieve such a seemingly simple
    > thing. Just stop telling people it's so damn simple, because it's NOT!

    Either way, my tyres are damn tight and there's no way I can get them on without a lever of some
    sort. By coincidence I bought a Topeak frame pump which has a tool for refitting as well.

    --
    StainlessSteelRat "Buffy, when I said you could slay vampires and have a social life, I didn't mean
    at the same time." -- Giles
     
  15. On Sun, 13 Apr 2003 16:25:42 +0100, contributor Tony R had scribed:
    > I've always found my tyres nastily tight (Top Touring and then Top Touring
    > 2000) but rarely suffer punctures so rarely experience the nastiness. Once they're on I've always
    > pumped them up as hard as I can, contributing to rareness of punctures I assume.
    >

    When I acquired a new bike with Continental Top Touring tyres many years ago, I didn't like them,
    preferring tyres which appeared less chunky, I had used Michelin Select. I vowed I would replace
    them as soon as they wear out with something else - guess what, I broke that vow since the TT tyres
    punctured rarely and they lasted a long time, I replaced with TT, I have not long run out of spares
    which hang in the garage (buying several at a time).

    As for tyre pressure, I usually pump to about 5-10 psi higher than the spec.

    Gary - Still catching up on news group reading

    --

    The email address is for newsgroups purposes only and therefore unlikely to be read.

    For contact via email use my real name with an underscore separator at the domain of CompuServe.
     
  16. On Mon, 21 Apr 2003 13:51:36 +0100, contributor Usenet had scribed:
    > And to all those people who write to say they've never had any problems refitting tyres - well,
    > it's possible you're blessed with thumbs of steel but after half-an-hour of trying to get a tyre
    > back on I'm normally weeping with frustration at my inability to achieve such a seemingly simple
    > thing. Just stop telling people it's so damn simple, because it's NOT!
    >

    I used to be able to not only be able replace tyres without levers but also remove tyres without
    levers when I am sufficiently annoyed. But TTs on Mavic reintroduces the temptation to use levers to
    replace the tyres.

    Gary

    --

    The email address is for newsgroups purposes only and therefore unlikely to be read.

    For contact via email use my real name with an underscore separator at the domain of CompuServe.
     
  17. On Wed, 16 Apr 2003 17:59:47 +0100, contributor Andy Dingley had scribed:
    > TT's were always infamously tight, especially on Mavic rims.
    >

    Don't I know it, the same combination I use.

    Gary

    --

    The email address is for newsgroups purposes only and therefore unlikely to be read.

    For contact via email use my real name with an underscore separator at the domain of CompuServe.
     
  18. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    "Gary Knighton" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > When I acquired a new bike with Continental Top Touring tyres many years ago, I didn't like them,
    > preferring tyres which appeared less chunky, I
    had
    > used Michelin Select. I vowed I would replace them as soon as they wear
    out
    > with something else - guess what, I broke that vow since the TT tyres punctured rarely and they
    > lasted a long time, I replaced with TT, I have
    not
    > long run out of spares which hang in the garage (buying several at a
    time).

    When I got a new bike with conti TTs I gave them a go. When they started splitting I stopped...

    Shows the answer is as always YMMV.

    cheers, clive
     
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