Reheating a rib roast

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by [email protected], Mar 28, 2005.

  1. I cooked a rib roast for Easter, and now have a bit left over. Everyone
    had seconds, so not much left over, maybe a pound and a half max. I
    would like to reheat it and I know it will not be as good as the first
    time, but how to do this without over cooking ? I'm thinking put it in
    an over at 225 F (a bit over 100 C) until just warmed through, but I
    have never done this before.

    BTW, the rib roast was put in the oven at 400 for 45 min, then 350 for
    a bit over an hour. I had halved onions in the pan from the start, and
    added carrots, radishes, celery, and golden potatoes when I turned down
    the temp. When I took the roast out to rest, I cranked up the heat a
    bit to brown the veggies a bit more. Very simple and very very good.

    Dean G.
     
    Tags:


  2. Deb

    Deb Guest

    We always slice the leftovers up, heat the au juice and put the slices of
    the roast into the hot juice to warm it. Keeps the meat from drying out and
    overcooking so much.



    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I cooked a rib roast for Easter, and now have a bit left over. Everyone
    > had seconds, so not much left over, maybe a pound and a half max. I
    > would like to reheat it and I know it will not be as good as the first
    > time, but how to do this without over cooking ? I'm thinking put it in
    > an over at 225 F (a bit over 100 C) until just warmed through, but I
    > have never done this before.
    >
    > BTW, the rib roast was put in the oven at 400 for 45 min, then 350 for
    > a bit over an hour. I had halved onions in the pan from the start, and
    > added carrots, radishes, celery, and golden potatoes when I turned down
    > the temp. When I took the roast out to rest, I cranked up the heat a
    > bit to brown the veggies a bit more. Very simple and very very good.
    >
    > Dean G.
    >
     
  3. George

    George Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > I cooked a rib roast for Easter, and now have a bit left over. Everyone
    > had seconds, so not much left over, maybe a pound and a half max. I
    > would like to reheat it and I know it will not be as good as the first
    > time, but how to do this without over cooking ? I'm thinking put it in
    > an over at 225 F (a bit over 100 C) until just warmed through, but I
    > have never done this before.
    >
    > BTW, the rib roast was put in the oven at 400 for 45 min, then 350 for
    > a bit over an hour. I had halved onions in the pan from the start, and
    > added carrots, radishes, celery, and golden potatoes when I turned down
    > the temp. When I took the roast out to rest, I cranked up the heat a
    > bit to brown the veggies a bit more. Very simple and very very good.
    >
    > Dean G.
    >


    Usually the best way to reheat anything is to put it in the nuker for a
    short period and then test, giving it a little more heating if needed.
     
  4. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    George wrote:
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >> I cooked a rib roast for Easter, and now have a bit left over. Everyone
    >> had seconds, so not much left over, maybe a pound and a half max. I
    >> would like to reheat it and I know it will not be as good as the first
    >> time, but how to do this without over cooking ? I'm thinking put it in
    >> an over at 225 F (a bit over 100 C) until just warmed through, but I
    >> have never done this before.
    >>
    >> BTW, the rib roast was put in the oven at 400 for 45 min, then 350 for
    >> a bit over an hour. I had halved onions in the pan from the start, and
    >> added carrots, radishes, celery, and golden potatoes when I turned down
    >> the temp. When I took the roast out to rest, I cranked up the heat a
    >> bit to brown the veggies a bit more. Very simple and very very good.
    >>
    >> Dean G.
    >>

    >
    > Usually the best way to reheat anything is to put it in the nuker for a
    > short period and then test, giving it a little more heating if needed.



    I have better luck reheating just about anything by using a small
    nonstick skillet over *very* low heat and with a tight-fitting lid
    (borrowed from a saucepan). I would slice the roast into thick slices
    and heat it that way -- perhaps with a little gravy.

    Bob
     
  5. Dog3 wrote:

    > I dyed 2 dozen Easter eggs. I'm going to have some egg salad and then the
    > rest will go into regular salads and I'm not sure what else. I did way too
    > many.



    Have some friends/neighbors over for a few pitchers of martoonis...get 'em
    good 'n sloshed. Then announce "Easter egg hunt!" ;-p

    --
    Best
    Greg
     
  6. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > I cooked a rib roast for Easter, and now have a bit left over. Everyone
    > had seconds, so not much left over, maybe a pound and a half max. I
    > would like to reheat it and I know it will not be as good as the first
    > time, but how to do this without over cooking ? I'm thinking put it in
    > an over at 225 F (a bit over 100 C) until just warmed through, but I
    > have never done this before.
    >
    > BTW, the rib roast was put in the oven at 400 for 45 min, then 350 for
    > a bit over an hour. I had halved onions in the pan from the start, and
    > added carrots, radishes, celery, and golden potatoes when I turned down
    > the temp. When I took the roast out to rest, I cranked up the heat a
    > bit to brown the veggies a bit more. Very simple and very very good.


    Mmmmmm, left over rib roast.

    I like to cut off the ribs, smear them with BBQ sauce, wrap them with
    aluminium foil and heat them up in the oven. The rest of the meat is
    sliced thin and warmed up in the left over gravy, so I hope you made lots
    of gravy.
     
  7. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Michael wrote:

    > I dyed 2 dozen Easter eggs. I'm going to have some egg salad and then the
    > rest will go into regular salads and I'm not sure what else. I did way too
    > many.


    Last November I posted a couple recipes which are good for using up
    hard-boiled eggs. Here they are again:

    Spicy Hard-Cooked Eggs in Coconut Milk with Chiles
    (from _Big Flavors of the Hot Sun_)

    3 tablespoons virgin olive oil
    1 small red onion, diced small
    1 tablespoon minced ginger
    1 teaspoon minced garlic
    1 tablespoon minced fresh red or green chile pepper of your choice
    1 tablespoon brown sugar
    1/2 cup pineapple juice
    6 tablespoons lime juice (about 3 limes)
    1 cup unsweetened coconut milk
    4 dashes Worcestershire sauce
    3 tablespoons curry powder
    Salt and freshly cracked black pepper to taste
    8 hard-cooked eggs, shells removed

    In a large sauté pan, heat the oil over medium-high heat until hot but not
    smoking. Add the onion and sauté, stirring frequently, for 3 to 4 minutes.
    Add the ginger, garlic, and chile and sauté, stirring, for 1 additional
    minute.

    Add the brown sugar, pineapple juice, and lime juice and cook, stirring
    occasionally, for 5 minutes. Add the coconut milk, Worcestershire sauce,
    curry powder, salt, and pepper. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to low, and
    simmer for 10 minutes; the mixture should thicken slightly.

    Add the eggs, cook for 3 minutes, and serve.

    Serves 4 as an appetizer


    Egg Curry
    (from _The Fiery Cuisines_)

    2 tablespoons curry powder
    1 cup onion, finely chopped
    2 tablespoons butter
    1 tablespoon flour
    1 cup milk
    8 hard-cooked eggs, chopped
    4 toasted English muffins
    Fresh cilantro or parsley, chopped

    Sauté the onion in the butter until soft. Stir in the curry and flour and
    heat for an additional 2 minutes. Slowly add the milk, stirring constantly,
    until the sauce thickens. Add the chopped eggs and heat thoroughly. Pour
    over the muffins, garnish with the cilantro or parsley, and serve.

    Serves 4


    I also ran across a recipe for egg étouffée several months ago, but I can't
    find it now. It wouldn't be too difficult to recreate; just follow any
    étouffée recipe but add hard-boiled eggs. Here's one adapted from
    www.emerils.com:

    Egg Étouffée

    1 1/2 sticks (12 tablespoons) butter
    2 tablespoons flour
    4 cups chopped onions
    2 cups chopped bell peppers
    2 cups chopped celery
    1/4 pound chopped ham
    2 teaspoons chopped garlic
    1 dozen hard-boiled eggs, peeled and halved lengthwise
    1 teaspoon salt
    1/2 teaspoon cayenne
    2 cups chicken stock, ham stock, or water
    6 tablespoons chopped parsley
    1/2 cup chopped green onions

    Melt the butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Sprinkle on the flour
    and cook, stirring constantly, until the roux turns a light tan. Add the
    onions, bell peppers, celery, and ham, and sauté until the onions are soft
    and golden, about 10 minutes. (The roux should darken further during this
    cooking.) Add the garlic, eggs, salt, and cayenne and cook for 2 minutes.

    Add the stock or water little by little, stirring the whole time to avoid
    lumps. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer for 6 to 8
    minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the parsley and green onions. Stir and
    cook for about 2 minutes more.

    Serve right away.

    Yield: 4 to 6 servings


    If you're REALLY desperate to use up hard-boiled eggs, you can add them to
    gravy, as Paula Deen does.

    Bob
     
  8. [email protected] wrote:
    > I cooked a rib roast for Easter, and now have a bit left over.

    Everyone
    > had seconds, so not much left over, maybe a pound and a half max. I
    > would like to reheat it and I know it will not be as good as the

    first
    > time, but how to do this without over cooking ? I'm thinking put it

    in
    > an over at 225 F (a bit over 100 C) until just warmed through, but I
    > have never done this before.
    >
    > BTW, the rib roast was put in the oven at 400 for 45 min, then 350

    for
    > a bit over an hour. I had halved onions in the pan from the start,

    and
    > added carrots, radishes, celery, and golden potatoes when I turned

    down
    > the temp. When I took the roast out to rest, I cranked up the heat a
    > bit to brown the veggies a bit more. Very simple and very very good.
    >
    > Dean G.


    Yum, left-over rib roast. I like to make hot roast beef sandwiches - I
    make some "jus," using pan drippings, some "aus jus" dry mix (in
    envelopes, French's or McCormick's), some beef "Better than Boullion,"
    and some Johnny's French Dip Sauce and a can of beef broth. (When I
    mix all these different beef things together, they taste pretty durn
    good.) I heat up the leftover beef by slicing it cold and then just
    dunking the slices in the "jus" for about 30 seconds. This doesn't
    really cook it, but it does get it hot.

    Put layers of thin slices of beef in a white bread sandwich, cut
    cater-corner, plop mashed potatoes in the middle, and pour over the
    "jus" sauce or make it into gravy with thickening.

    Alternately, make French Dip sandwiches and serve the "jus" alongside
    with some of those thick frozen "steak fries" and garnish the plate
    with a big quarter of a dill pickle.

    N.
     
  9. Dog3 wrote:
    > "Deb" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    > > We always slice the leftovers up, heat the au juice and put the

    slices
    > > of the roast into the hot juice to warm it. Keeps the meat from

    drying
    > > out and overcooking so much.

    >
    > This is the way I do it. I've never had bad results. I've never done

    a rib
    > roast like this though. The au jus always works well. If I do not

    have
    > enough I use beef stock. I almost always have some on hand. I make

    beef and
    > chicken stock a lot and freeze it. Gawd, seems like I'm always in the


    > kitchen and I'm a novice cook.
    >
    > Ob Food:
    >
    > I dyed 2 dozen Easter eggs. I'm going to have some egg salad and then

    the
    > rest will go into regular salads and I'm not sure what else. I did

    way too
    > many.
    >


    Hard boiled eggs: Use them in potato salad; use them quartered in
    white sauce (along with tuna or chicken or dried beef) served over
    toast; or (my favorite) use them in white sauce poured over salmon
    patties. Yum.

    N.
     
  10. [email protected] wrote:
    > I cooked a rib roast for Easter, and now have a bit left over. Everyone
    > had seconds, so not much left over, maybe a pound and a half max. I
    > would like to reheat it and I know it will not be as good as the first
    > time, but how to do this without over cooking ? I'm thinking put it in
    > an over at 225 F (a bit over 100 C) until just warmed through, but I
    > have never done this before.
    >
    > BTW, the rib roast was put in the oven at 400 for 45 min, then 350 for
    > a bit over an hour. I had halved onions in the pan from the start, and
    > added carrots, radishes, celery, and golden potatoes when I turned down
    > the temp. When I took the roast out to rest, I cranked up the heat a
    > bit to brown the veggies a bit more. Very simple and very very good.


    Restaurant technique. Wrap a slice of it in lettuce leaves and nuke it
    until it's a bit more than warm. Should come out roughly to the same
    degree of doneness it went in. Eat as usual. I assume no directions
    needed. <g>

    Pastorio
     
  11. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    George wrote:

    > Usually the best way to reheat anything is to put it in the nuker for a
    > short period and then test, giving it a little more heating if needed.


    I generally consider the microwave to be an acceptable way to reheat things
    if there is no other way to do it, or if you are in too much of a hurry to
    wait for a better method.
     
  12. Serene

    Serene Guest

    Dave Smith <[email protected]> wrote:

    > George wrote:
    >
    > > Usually the best way to reheat anything is to put it in the nuker for a
    > > short period and then test, giving it a little more heating if needed.

    >
    > I generally consider the microwave to be an acceptable way to reheat things
    > if there is no other way to do it, or if you are in too much of a hurry to
    > wait for a better method.


    We don't have a microwave, and it's never been a problem. If we're in
    that big of a hurry to eat, we just have toast or something.

    serene
    --
    http://serenejournal.livejournal.com
    http://www.jhuger.com
     
  13. Dog3 wrote:

    > LOL... my neighbors would love it. I'm afraid the squirrels would get the
    > eggs first. The squirrels here are absolutely carniverous. One of them
    > ripped off a neighbors ham sandwich which she had on the patio with the
    > rest of her lunch. We watched the yard rat climb up a tree with it.
    >


    Man, once a squirrel jumped off of a branch and came into the apartment
    through an open window (at that time I had French windows with no screens).
    What a PITA to get the thing out...finally lured it up to the window sill
    with peanuts and then OUT.

    There's a coupla black squirrels in the big tree out the window...they and
    the bluejays can make quite a racket when they decide to rumble...

    It's also fun to watch the crows dive - bomb the pidgeons...

    --
    Best
    Greg
     
  14. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Michael replied:

    >> If you're REALLY desperate to use up hard-boiled eggs, you can add
    >> them to gravy, as Paula Deen does.
    >>

    > Sounds good although I've not seen Paula Deen's recipe and I'm not to sure
    > about the gravy. Your recipe sounds good.


    On the Food Network's Thanksgiving special last year, she made giblet gravy,
    then added chunks of hard-boiled egg. She claimed that it was "traditional."
    There was a bit of discussion about it in this newsgroup; the most favorable
    comment was (through the magic of Google), "It's not objectional & adds a
    bit of interest to the gravy." But most people didn't care for the idea.

    Bob
     
  15. I know I'm late for this one, but what I do is slice the meat thin
    (1/16 or maybe an 1/8 of an inch) and get a non stick pan and heat it
    up real high. Then put the meat in for a few seconds, turn it over
    and get it out fast. The meat will be dark on the outside, still red
    (if it was ever red) on the inside and warm. Then put the au jus or
    gravy on it. However, I like it best on a sandwich.

    alan

    On 28 Mar 2005 09:56:15 -0800, [email protected] wrote:

    >I cooked a rib roast for Easter, and now have a bit left over. Everyone
    >had seconds, so not much left over, maybe a pound and a half max. I
    >would like to reheat it and I know it will not be as good as the first
    >time, but how to do this without over cooking ? I'm thinking put it in
    >an over at 225 F (a bit over 100 C) until just warmed through, but I
    >have never done this before.
    >
    >BTW, the rib roast was put in the oven at 400 for 45 min, then 350 for
    >a bit over an hour. I had halved onions in the pan from the start, and
    >added carrots, radishes, celery, and golden potatoes when I turned down
    >the temp. When I took the roast out to rest, I cranked up the heat a
    >bit to brown the veggies a bit more. Very simple and very very good.
    >
    >Dean G.
     
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