REMA patch shelf life

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by B.C. Cletta, Oct 4, 2003.

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  1. B.C. Cletta

    B.C. Cletta Guest

    i'm thinking of buying a 100 box of the patches only and would like to know if they have a shelf
    life, properly stored of course.
     
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  2. Larry Fieman

    Larry Fieman Guest

    "B.C. Cletta" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > i'm thinking of buying a 100 box of the patches only and would like to know if they have a shelf
    > life, properly stored of course.

    I got a box of 100 about 5 years ago. I take no special care of them re storage. So far, they have
    not shown any obvious signs of degradation.

    Larry
     
  3. Richard

    Richard Guest

    The patches seem to last for years. It's the GLUE that dries up, even if the tube is never
    punctured. Takes a few years, but it will dry up eventually....

    [email protected] (B.C. Cletta) wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > i'm thinking of buying a 100 box of the patches only and would like to know if they have a shelf
    > life, properly stored of course.
     
  4. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

    On 4 Oct 2003 13:56:00 -0700, [email protected] (B.C. Cletta) wrote:

    >i'm thinking of buying a 100 box of the patches only and would like to know if they have a shelf
    >life, properly stored of course.

    My only negative experience to buying patches in bulk is that after a while it seems the
    plastic film becomes almost impossible to remove after applying the patch. It this doesn't
    bother you, go ahead.

    jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
  5. Richard

    Richard Guest

    How do you try to remove the film? I once had problems because I was trying to peel it from the
    edge. I finally noticed the slice across the
    middle. Stretch the glued-on patch across the slice, and the film splits. Once it splits, it's
    pretty easy to get it off.

    John Everett <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On 4 Oct 2003 13:56:00 -0700, [email protected] (B.C. Cletta) wrote:
    >
    >>i'm thinking of buying a 100 box of the patches only and would like to know if they have a shelf
    >>life, properly stored of course.
    >
    > My only negative experience to buying patches in bulk is that after a while it seems the plastic
    > film becomes almost impossible to remove after applying the patch. It this doesn't bother you,
    > go ahead.
     
  6. Owen Pope

    Owen Pope Guest

    [email protected] (B.C. Cletta) wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > i'm thinking of buying a 100 box of the patches only and would like to know if they have a shelf
    > life, properly stored of course.

    Where'd you find them? I've been looking around, but haven't had any luck.

    Also, what do you use as glue? Is it just rubber cement? (All the tubes that come with patch kits
    say "Vulcanizing solution" or some such)

    -Owen
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>, Owen Pope <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Also, what do you use as glue? Is it just rubber cement? (All the tubes that come with patch kits
    >say "Vulcanizing solution" or some such)

    I use rubber cement. I have a small can of it that I got at the local Office Depot. It's lasted a
    couple of years so far.

    --
    Mike Iglesias Email: [email protected]cs.uci.edu University of California, Irvine phone: 949-824-6926
    Network & Academic Computing Services FAX: 949-824-2069
     
  8. Dave Lehnen

    Dave Lehnen Guest

    Owen Pope wrote:
    > [email protected] (B.C. Cletta) wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >
    >
    >>i'm thinking of buying a 100 box of the patches only and would like to know if they have a shelf
    >>life, properly stored of course.
    >
    >
    > Where'd you find them? I've been looking around, but haven't had any luck.
    >
    > Also, what do you use as glue? Is it just rubber cement? (All the tubes that come with patch kits
    > say "Vulcanizing solution" or some such)
    >
    > -Owen

    I bought mine from Loose Screws Bicycle Small Parts,

    http://www.thethirdhand.com/index.cgi?c=Tire/Tube&sc=Repair&id=5390202663

    A local bike shop sells Rema cement separately from the patch kits, in a somewhat larger tube.
    Monkey Grip rubber cement from an auto parts store did not work well with the Rema patches.

    Dave Lehnen
     
  9. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "richard" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > How do you try to remove the film? I once had problems because I was trying to peel it from the
    > edge. I finally noticed the slice across the
    > middle. Stretch the glued-on patch across the slice, and the film splits. Once it splits, it's
    > pretty easy to get it off.

    I never remove the "films". Why bother?
     
  10. B.C. Cletta

    B.C. Cletta Guest

    > > How do you try to remove the film? I once had problems because I was
    and:
    > I never remove the "films". Why bother?

    concur. what i noticed is that w/ the film the patch is less likely to stick to the tire. (yes, i
    use talc. and yes, i'm confident that it's the patch and not the surrounding glue that's sticking
    to the tire.)
     
  11. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    Peter Cole writes:

    >> How do you try to remove the film? I once had problems because I was trying to peel it from the
    >> edge. I finally noticed the slice across the middle. Stretch the glued-on patch across the slice,
    >> and the film splits. Once it splits, it's pretty easy to get it off.

    > I never remove the "films". Why bother?

    You must have wondered why the manufacturer bothered to make removal of the cellophane easier with a
    central split. The intent was to help in removing it before inflating the tire. If it is not
    removed, the tube will tend to not expand with the tube even as poorly as it does without the
    cellophane. This cover, like the foil on the adhesion side is there to prevent the patch from drying
    out and becoming brittle. Being inelastic, when not removed, it prevents the patch from expanding
    with inflation to seat in the larger cross section of the tire casing. This can help in dislodging a
    patch if the tube is used right after patching.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected]
     
  12. Wayne Menzie

    Wayne Menzie Guest

    [email protected] (B.C. Cletta) wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > what i noticed is that w/ the film the patch is less likely to stick to the tire. (yes, i use
    > talc. and yes, i'm confident that it's the patch and not the surrounding glue that's sticking to
    > the tire.)

    Why do you use talc?

    --
    Wayne Menzie
     
  13. Velocat

    Velocat Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    >>I never remove the "films". Why bother?
    >
    >
    > You must have wondered why the manufacturer bothered to make removal of the cellophane easier with
    > a central split. The intent was to help in removing it before inflating the tire. If it is not
    > removed, the tube will tend to not expand with the tube even as poorly as it does without the
    > cellophane. This cover, like the foil on the adhesion side is there to prevent the patch from
    > drying out and becoming brittle. Being inelastic, when not removed, it prevents the patch from
    > expanding with inflation to seat in the larger cross section of the tire casing. This can help in
    > dislodging a patch if the tube is used right after patching.
    >

    How is the film attached to the patch? Are the expansion forces of the tube less than the adhesion
    between the film and the patch?

    What bothers me is the edge of the patch is feathered and the film often starts pulling up the patch
    here when it is pulled away.

    Dave Andersen
     
  14. David Kunz

    David Kunz Guest

    VeloCat wrote:

    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >>> I never remove the "films". Why bother?
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> You must have wondered why the manufacturer bothered to make removal of the cellophane easier
    >> with a central split. The intent was to help in removing it before inflating the tire. If it is
    >> not removed, the tube will tend to not expand with the tube even as poorly as it does without the
    >> cellophane. This cover, like the foil on the adhesion side is there to prevent the patch from
    >> drying out and becoming brittle. Being inelastic, when not removed, it prevents the patch from
    >> expanding with inflation to seat in the larger cross section of the tire casing. This can help in
    >> dislodging a patch if the tube is used right after patching.
    >>
    >
    > How is the film attached to the patch? Are the expansion forces of the tube less than the adhesion
    > between the film and the patch?
    >
    > What bothers me is the edge of the patch is feathered and the film often starts pulling up the
    > patch here when it is pulled away.

    I find that by the time that I need to put the next patch on and look at the last one, the plastic's
    essentially shreadded.

    When I do remove it, I pull one corner up slightly and then separate it from the patch with my
    fingernail. I continue to use my fingernail to hold the edge of the patch down, and press it firmly
    again when the plastic film's off. If the patch comes even with the above, you didn't let the glue
    dry enough before putting the patch on :).

    YMMV David
     
  15. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    David Kunz writes:

    >>>> I never remove the "films". Why bother?

    >>> You must have wondered why the manufacturer bothered to make removal of the cellophane easier
    >>> with a central split. The intent was to help in removing it before inflating the tire. If it is
    >>> not removed, the tube will tend to not expand with the tube even as poorly as it does without
    >>> the cellophane. This cover, like the foil on the adhesion side is there to prevent the patch
    >>> from drying out and becoming brittle. Being inelastic, when not removed, it prevents the patch
    >>> from expanding with inflation to seat in the larger cross section of the tire casing. This can
    >>> help in dislodging a patch if the tube is used right after patching.

    >> How is the film attached to the patch? Are the expansion forces of the tube less than the
    >> adhesion between the film and the patch?

    >> What bothers me is the edge of the patch is feathered and the film often starts pulling up the
    >> patch here when it is pulled away.

    > I find that by the time that I need to put the next patch on and look at the last one, the
    > plastic's essentially shredded.

    That takes a little time and goes along with the test I suggest for people to see how severely a
    bias ply bicycle tire massages a patch that has just been installed. Laying a business card between
    tire and tube, it will be turned to confetti in less than 100 miles. However, the stretch effect I
    mentioned is more immediate, before the cellophane is torn up.

    > When I do remove it, I pull one corner up slightly and then separate it from the patch with my
    > fingernail. I continue to use my fingernail to hold the edge of the patch down, and press it
    > firmly again when the plastic film's off. If the patch comes even with the above, you didn't let
    > the glue dry enough before putting the patch on :).

    The cellophane has a practically invisible split across the center of the patch. By stretching the
    patch, this split will break and the foil can be peeled away from the center to the outside. I often
    get the impression that people who do not remove the cellophane are not aware of this intended
    removal method.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected]
     
  16. bball

    bball Guest

    On Tue, 07 Oct 2003 17:51:34 GMT, [email protected] wrote:

    >David Kunz writes:
    >
    >>>>> I never remove the "films". Why bother?
    >
    >>>> You must have wondered why the manufacturer bothered to make removal of the cellophane easier
    >>>> with a central split. The intent was to help in removing it before inflating the tire. If it is
    >>>> not removed, the tube will tend to not expand with the tube even as poorly as it does without
    >>>> the cellophane. This cover, like the foil on the adhesion side is there to prevent the patch
    >>>> from drying out and becoming brittle. Being inelastic, when not removed, it prevents the patch
    >>>> from expanding with inflation to seat in the larger cross section of the tire casing. This can
    >>>> help in dislodging a patch if the tube is used right after patching.
    >
    >>> How is the film attached to the patch? Are the expansion forces of the tube less than the
    >>> adhesion between the film and the patch?
    >
    >>> What bothers me is the edge of the patch is feathered and the film often starts pulling up the
    >>> patch here when it is pulled away.
    >
    >> I find that by the time that I need to put the next patch on and look at the last one, the
    >> plastic's essentially shredded.
    >
    >That takes a little time and goes along with the test I suggest for people to see how severely a
    >bias ply bicycle tire massages a patch that has just been installed. Laying a business card between
    >tire and tube, it will be turned to confetti in less than 100 miles. However, the stretch effect I
    >mentioned is more immediate, before the cellophane is torn up.
    >
    >> When I do remove it, I pull one corner up slightly and then separate it from the patch with my
    >> fingernail. I continue to use my fingernail to hold the edge of the patch down, and press it
    >> firmly again when the plastic film's off. If the patch comes even with the above, you didn't let
    >> the glue dry enough before putting the patch on :).
    >
    >The cellophane has a practically invisible split across the center of the patch. By stretching the
    >patch, this split will break and the foil can be peeled away from the center to the outside. I
    >often get the impression that people who do not remove the cellophane are not aware of this
    >intended removal method.
    >
    >Jobst Brandt [email protected]

    Stretch effect? If a repair patch is applied to a tube which has been inflated to an operating
    diameter or larger (usually the case), then the stretch effect is between the ears rather than on
    the tube after installation and inflation.

    Bruce Ball
     
  17. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    Bruce Ball writes:

    > Stretch effect? If a repair patch is applied to a tube which has been inflated to an operating
    > diameter or larger (usually the case), then the stretch effect is between the ears rather than on
    > the tube after installation and inflation.

    Patching over a blowing leak is not a reasonable method for applying a patch. Besides, when
    deflating the tube for installation, the patch will buckle into a dome, under which the tube pulls
    away. I suspect this is one of those specious offerings from a disgruntled reader.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected]
     
  18. On 6 Oct 2003 00:44:32 GMT, Owen Pope <[email protected]> wrote:

    >[email protected] (B.C. Cletta) wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >what do you use as glue?

    >-Owen

    It's been forever since I've bought a patch kit. I use old innertubes for making patches because
    they are a dime a dozen and I can cut a patch to any size that I need from them. I use some common
    rubber cement to make it stick. A few times in a pinch I've used RTV Silicon sealant and even Goop
    as glue. Never had one fail. The best patches I've used are some old Camel hot patches I have left
    over from my father when he worked for a service station. Patches are at least as old as me but
    still work like a charm. The rubber is still good and they flare up like new. If you can find new
    ones available I'd recommend them.
     
  19. [email protected] wrote:
    : I suspect this is one of those specious offerings from a disgruntled reader.

    have you ever considered just omitting the last sentence of every one of your posts?
    --
    david reuteler [email protected]
     
  20. bball

    bball Guest

    On Wed, 08 Oct 2003 14:02:15 -0500, Shannon Reynolds <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 6 Oct 2003 00:44:32 GMT, Owen Pope <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>[email protected] (B.C. Cletta) wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >>what do you use as glue?
    >
    >>-Owen
    >
    >
    >It's been forever since I've bought a patch kit. I use old innertubes for making patches because
    >they are a dime a dozen and I can cut a patch to any size that I need from them. I use some common
    >rubber cement to make it stick. A few times in a pinch I've used RTV Silicon sealant and even Goop
    >as glue. Never had one fail. The best patches I've used are some old Camel hot patches I have left
    >over from my father when he worked for a service station. Patches are at least as old as me but
    >still work like a charm. The rubber is still good and they flare up like new. If you can find new
    >ones available I'd recommend them.

    I tried that but I didn't have any luck using pieces of innertube. Additionally I like the feathered
    edges of patches.

    Bruce Ball
     
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