Removable platform for rear rack?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by David Kerber, Apr 20, 2004.

  1. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    Boy, I'm really losing it today; I meant to post this in .misc, but put
    it in .rides instead; sorry about that. Maybe the 3rd time will be a
    charm!

    I posted this in .tech, but didn't get any responses, so I'll try
    here...

    I'm looking for plans (or a pre-made one) for a platform which I can
    easily attach to and remove from my rear rack, which would be big enough
    to hold a large gym bag (approx 27" long, 12" wide) without it hanging
    way off the end and sides as it does on the factory rack.

    I'm sure I could whip something up out of 1/4" plywood and four u-bolts,
    but was wondering is somebody knows of a better-looking, more durable
    solution.

    Aluminum would be nice, but not necessary. I have wood working tools,
    but not much in the way of metal working tools except for a bench vise,
    a hacksaw and a Dremel, so complex metal bending and welding are
    out (simple bending, cutting and soldering are ok).

    Thanks for any suggestions!

    --
    Remove the ns_ from if replying by e-mail (but keep posts in the
    newsgroups if possible).
     
    Tags:


  2. Robert Dole

    Robert Dole Guest

    David Kerber <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Boy, I'm really losing it today; I meant to post this in .misc, but put
    > it in .rides instead; sorry about that. Maybe the 3rd time will be a
    > charm!
    >
    > I posted this in .tech, but didn't get any responses, so I'll try
    > here...
    >
    > I'm looking for plans (or a pre-made one) for a platform which I can
    > easily attach to and remove from my rear rack, which would be big enough
    > to hold a large gym bag (approx 27" long, 12" wide) without it hanging
    > way off the end and sides as it does on the factory rack.
    >
    > I'm sure I could whip something up out of 1/4" plywood and four u-bolts,
    > but was wondering is somebody knows of a better-looking, more durable
    > solution.
    >
    > Aluminum would be nice, but not necessary. I have wood working tools,
    > but not much in the way of metal working tools except for a bench vise,
    > a hacksaw and a Dremel, so complex metal bending and welding are
    > out (simple bending, cutting and soldering are ok).


    One possible simple solution: plastic storage crate (milk crate), tied
    on with rope or elastic rope.

    Gym bag would stand up on end, the 12*12 part put into the milk crate,
    and the remainder of the 27 inch dimension hangout out the top.

    Use old shoelace to tie gym bag so it can't fall out.
     
  3. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > David Kerber <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Boy, I'm really losing it today; I meant to post this in .misc, but put
    > > it in .rides instead; sorry about that. Maybe the 3rd time will be a
    > > charm!
    > >
    > > I posted this in .tech, but didn't get any responses, so I'll try
    > > here...
    > >
    > > I'm looking for plans (or a pre-made one) for a platform which I can
    > > easily attach to and remove from my rear rack, which would be big enough
    > > to hold a large gym bag (approx 27" long, 12" wide) without it hanging
    > > way off the end and sides as it does on the factory rack.
    > >
    > > I'm sure I could whip something up out of 1/4" plywood and four u-bolts,
    > > but was wondering is somebody knows of a better-looking, more durable
    > > solution.
    > >
    > > Aluminum would be nice, but not necessary. I have wood working tools,
    > > but not much in the way of metal working tools except for a bench vise,
    > > a hacksaw and a Dremel, so complex metal bending and welding are
    > > out (simple bending, cutting and soldering are ok).

    >
    > One possible simple solution: plastic storage crate (milk crate), tied
    > on with rope or elastic rope.


    This is one of my "last resort" possibilities. I'm no fashion nut, but
    this is a little uglier than even I would like. Even this might not be
    real stable, since the crate would stick out several inches on either
    side of the rack, with the tall bag raising the center of gravity quite
    a bit.

    Thanks for the response, though; you're the first one.

    --
    Remove the ns_ from if replying by e-mail (but keep posts in the
    newsgroups if possible).
     
  4. Kent Hoult

    Kent Hoult Guest

    I saw the ultimate version of this last summer in Holly, MI.

    There was a guy riding his bike around that had a 3 foot square plywood
    sheet
    mounted on the back. It was nicely covered in carpet, and had his German
    Shepard
    riding on it :)


    "David Kerber" <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Boy, I'm really losing it today; I meant to post this in .misc, but put
    > it in .rides instead; sorry about that. Maybe the 3rd time will be a
    > charm!
    >
    > I posted this in .tech, but didn't get any responses, so I'll try
    > here...
    >
    > I'm looking for plans (or a pre-made one) for a platform which I can
    > easily attach to and remove from my rear rack, which would be big enough
    > to hold a large gym bag (approx 27" long, 12" wide) without it hanging
    > way off the end and sides as it does on the factory rack.
    >
    > I'm sure I could whip something up out of 1/4" plywood and four u-bolts,
    > but was wondering is somebody knows of a better-looking, more durable
    > solution.
    >
    > Aluminum would be nice, but not necessary. I have wood working tools,
    > but not much in the way of metal working tools except for a bench vise,
    > a hacksaw and a Dremel, so complex metal bending and welding are
    > out (simple bending, cutting and soldering are ok).
    >
    > Thanks for any suggestions!
    >
    > --
    > Remove the ns_ from if replying by e-mail (but keep posts in the
    > newsgroups if possible).
     
  5. Richard

    Richard Guest

    "David Kerber" <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Boy, I'm really losing it today; I meant to post this in .misc, but put
    > it in .rides instead; sorry about that. Maybe the 3rd time will be a
    > charm!
    >
    > I posted this in .tech, but didn't get any responses, so I'll try
    > here...
    >
    > I'm looking for plans (or a pre-made one) for a platform which I can
    > easily attach to and remove from my rear rack, which would be big enough
    > to hold a large gym bag (approx 27" long, 12" wide) without it hanging
    > way off the end and sides as it does on the factory rack.
    >
    > I'm sure I could whip something up out of 1/4" plywood and four u-bolts,
    > but was wondering is somebody knows of a better-looking, more durable
    > solution.
    >
    > Aluminum would be nice, but not necessary. I have wood working tools,
    > but not much in the way of metal working tools except for a bench vise,
    > a hacksaw and a Dremel, so complex metal bending and welding are
    > out (simple bending, cutting and soldering are ok).
    >
    > Thanks for any suggestions!
    >
    > --
    > Remove the ns_ from if replying by e-mail (but keep posts in the
    > newsgroups if possible).


    I found a folding camping grill that is about 12" X 24". Removed the
    folding legs, and used aprox. 3/16" rope to fasten to my rack. Been using it
    for over a year with no problems.
     
  6. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Tue, 20 Apr 2004 08:52:17 -0400, David Kerber
    <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote:
    >I'm looking for plans (or a pre-made one) for a platform which I can
    >easily attach to and remove from my rear rack, which would be big enough
    >to hold a large gym bag (approx 27" long, 12" wide) without it hanging
    >way off the end and sides as it does on the factory rack.


    Find a largish, rubber-coated-wire basket. Wal Mart has some, I
    don't recall if the size is appropriate.

    I don't know what to say for a QR, though. I've been considering
    almost the same idea for awhile (just haven't worked very hard on it
    :).
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  7. On Tue, 20 Apr 2004 14:08:24 -0400, David Kerber
    <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote:

    >This is one of my "last resort" possibilities. I'm no fashion nut, but
    >this is a little uglier than even I would like. Even this might not be
    >real stable, since the crate would stick out several inches on either
    >side of the rack, with the tall bag raising the center of gravity quite
    >a bit.
    >
    >Thanks for the response, though; you're the first one.


    Well, the first thing is that with only five racks, I have four
    designs in my garage. I'm not counting two or three hanging from the
    wall. I think the fastening system would have to be different for each
    one.

    I had a device long ago that had eight arms that slid out to expand to
    whatever size you needed. Not real hefty, but worked for most items.
    You needed bungie cords to hold the whole thing together. Haven't seen
    them in a very long time. Think I would try to go that route, though.
    Sliding arms that nested inside the regular rack. Wouldn't be hard to
    do with some wall shelving racks (the parts you nail to the wall to
    snap the extensions into) as the outside pieces and something inside
    to slide. You could triple the width and extend the rear while keeping
    the normal dimensions most of the time.

    Curtis L. Russell
    Odenton, MD (USA)
    Just someone on two wheels...
     
  8. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...

    ....

    > I found a folding camping grill that is about 12" X 24". Removed the
    > folding legs, and used aprox. 3/16" rope to fasten to my rack. Been using it
    > for over a year with no problems.


    That's a good idea; thanks!

    --
    Remove the ns_ from if replying by e-mail (but keep posts in the
    newsgroups if possible).
     
  9. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > On Tue, 20 Apr 2004 08:52:17 -0400, David Kerber
    > <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote:
    > >I'm looking for plans (or a pre-made one) for a platform which I can
    > >easily attach to and remove from my rear rack, which would be big enough
    > >to hold a large gym bag (approx 27" long, 12" wide) without it hanging
    > >way off the end and sides as it does on the factory rack.

    >
    > Find a largish, rubber-coated-wire basket. Wal Mart has some, I
    > don't recall if the size is appropriate.
    >
    > I don't know what to say for a QR, though. I've been considering
    > almost the same idea for awhile (just haven't worked very hard on it
    > :).


    Something like U-bolts with wing nuts would be quick enough; I don't
    need a single-lever release or anything like that.


    --
    Remove the ns_ from if replying by e-mail (but keep posts in the
    newsgroups if possible).
     
  10. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    russells.org says...

    ....

    > I had a device long ago that had eight arms that slid out to expand to
    > whatever size you needed. Not real hefty, but worked for most items.
    > You needed bungie cords to hold the whole thing together. Haven't seen
    > them in a very long time. Think I would try to go that route, though.
    > Sliding arms that nested inside the regular rack. Wouldn't be hard to
    > do with some wall shelving racks (the parts you nail to the wall to
    > snap the extensions into) as the outside pieces and something inside
    > to slide. You could triple the width and extend the rear while keeping
    > the normal dimensions most of the time.


    I really like that one; it's worth some more design thought.

    --
    Remove the ns_ from if replying by e-mail (but keep posts in the
    newsgroups if possible).
     
  11. Robert Dole

    Robert Dole Guest

    David Kerber <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote
    > [email protected] says...
    > >
    > > One possible simple solution: plastic storage crate (milk crate), tied
    > > on with rope or elastic rope.

    >
    > This is one of my "last resort" possibilities. I'm no fashion nut, but
    > this is a little uglier than even I would like.


    > Even this might not be
    > real stable, since the crate would stick out several inches on either
    > side of the rack, with the tall bag raising the center of gravity quite
    > a bit.
    >

    You are correct on both counts. It's quite nerdy, and the stability
    depends on how well you attach it. If you want quick removal, there's
    a tendency to go with less sturdiness. The high center of gravity is a
    problem.

    > Thanks for the response, though; you're the first one.


    I hope what Russell posted is still in production; it sounds
    interesting.
     
  12. andrew smith

    andrew smith Guest

    "David Kerber" <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Boy, I'm really losing it today; I meant to post this in .misc, but put
    > it in .rides instead; sorry about that. Maybe the 3rd time will be a
    > charm!
    >
    > I posted this in .tech, but didn't get any responses, so I'll try
    > here...
    >
    > I'm looking for plans (or a pre-made one) for a platform which I can
    > easily attach to and remove from my rear rack, which would be big enough
    > to hold a large gym bag (approx 27" long, 12" wide) without it hanging
    > way off the end and sides as it does on the factory rack.
    >
    > I'm sure I could whip something up out of 1/4" plywood and four u-bolts,
    > but was wondering is somebody knows of a better-looking, more durable
    > solution.
    >
    > Aluminum would be nice, but not necessary. I have wood working tools,
    > but not much in the way of metal working tools except for a bench vise,
    > a hacksaw and a Dremel, so complex metal bending and welding are
    > out (simple bending, cutting and soldering are ok).
    >
    > Thanks for any suggestions!


    How about....

    A big aluminum cookie sheet attached w/ 4 bolts & wingnuts or a whopping
    piece of velcro.

    a.
     
  13. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Thu, 22 Apr 2004 03:20:04 GMT, "andrew smith"
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >"David Kerber" <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote in message
    >> I'm looking for plans (or a pre-made one) for a platform which I can
    >> easily attach to and remove from my rear rack, which would be big enough
    >> to hold a large gym bag (approx 27" long, 12" wide) without it hanging


    >A big aluminum cookie sheet attached w/ 4 bolts & wingnuts or a whopping
    >piece of velcro.


    Bolts for attaching the platform to the rack, and velcro for the
    bag-platform interface would be perfect.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  14. andrew smith

    andrew smith Guest

    "Rick Onanian" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Thu, 22 Apr 2004 03:20:04 GMT, "andrew smith"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >"David Kerber" <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote in message
    > >> I'm looking for plans (or a pre-made one) for a platform which I can
    > >> easily attach to and remove from my rear rack, which would be big

    enough
    > >> to hold a large gym bag (approx 27" long, 12" wide) without it hanging

    >
    > >A big aluminum cookie sheet attached w/ 4 bolts & wingnuts or a whopping
    > >piece of velcro.

    >
    > Bolts for attaching the platform to the rack, and velcro for the
    > bag-platform interface would be perfect.


    Actually, I think you've hit the perfect solution.

    Velcro on the existing rack & bag. No need to expand the rack.

    a.
     
  15. On Tue, 20 Apr 2004 08:52:17 -0400, David Kerber
    <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote:

    >I'm looking for plans (or a pre-made one) for a platform which I can
    >easily attach to and remove from my rear rack, which would be big enough
    >to hold a large gym bag (approx 27" long, 12" wide) without it hanging
    >way off the end and sides as it does on the factory rack.


    I made a nice detachable "box" that's worked out really well - maybe
    it'll work for you too :) It takes my laptop to work, or sports
    gear, or with the lid off, it can take a small load of groceries etc.

    I got a sturdy plastic box, about 50cm (19") wide and long and 20 cm
    (8") deep. The corners are rounded, making it seem reasonably
    aerodynamic :) The lid removes completely and overlaps the sides so
    it's waterproof. I bought some aluminium angle, drilled and screwed
    it to attach both inside and outside the box, so the base of the box
    is "sandwiched" into a rigid supporting frame.

    The side rails of the bike rack slide between the aluminium walls
    protruding from the bottom of the box, providing excellent sideways
    stability. Additional aluminium "hooks" on the bottom of the box
    slide under the cross-bars and side-rails of the rack, stopping the
    box from coming off vertically. I attached some shock cord (like a
    bungy but better - see a boating shop) to the under-side of the box
    that you stretch over the front of the rack, to stop the box sliding
    off backwards. To secure the shock cord onto the box, I bought
    special "u bolts" with attachment for gripping cord/cable.

    So, attaching or detaching the box only takes a few seconds - just
    position it on the rack, slide it forward so the "hooks" engage
    underneath the rack, and stretch the shock cord in place.

    When it's mounted, the box is about as wide as my hips, and extends
    back off the edge of the rack a little, but not beyond the rear wheel.
    The top of the box is below my saddle, leaving room for a saddle bag
    with blinkies on. But this general design would work for larger boxes
    too.

    I stuck some velcro on the bottom of the box to position a block of
    foam on the left and right sides. My laptop sits on these, absorbing
    road shocks. It's still working after several months of commuting! I
    also attached a shock cord strap that loops over the top of the box to
    hold down the lid (or the contents if too big for the lid). Stick on
    a couple of reflectors and it's done!

    The only tools required were a drill, saw, screwdrivers etc.
     
  16. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > On Tue, 20 Apr 2004 08:52:17 -0400, David Kerber
    > <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote:
    >
    > >I'm looking for plans (or a pre-made one) for a platform which I can
    > >easily attach to and remove from my rear rack, which would be big enough
    > >to hold a large gym bag (approx 27" long, 12" wide) without it hanging
    > >way off the end and sides as it does on the factory rack.

    >
    > I made a nice detachable "box" that's worked out really well - maybe
    > it'll work for you too :) It takes my laptop to work, or sports
    > gear, or with the lid off, it can take a small load of groceries etc.


    Sounds great! Thanks for the detailed description.

    .....

    --
    Dave Kerber
    Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  17. On Sat, 24 Apr 2004 20:07:12 -0400, David Kerber
    <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote:

    >...
    >Sounds great! Thanks for the detailed description.


    No problem! Let us know how your bag-carrying efforts go - it's
    always good to get other ideas...
     
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