Remove crank with stripped threads?



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D

Dorian Smith

Guest
How do you remove a crank when the threads are stripped and a crank puller tool can't be
screwed into it?
 
J

Jeff

Guest
Anybody like this?

Dislike this?

Cut old inner tubes and use them as liner underneath handlebar tape.

Probably extra handlebar tape will be necessary, to accommodate the extra diameter.
 
M

M-Gineering Imp

Guest
Dorian Smith wrote:
>
> How do you remove a crank when the threads are stripped and a crank puller tool can't be screwed
> into it?

1) cut oversize threads, use oversize puller
2) use a two or three armed bearing puller (try a garage)
--
Marten
 
S

Sergio Servadio

Guest
On Sat, 29 Mar 2003, Dorian Smith wrote:
> How do you remove a crank when the threads are stripped and a crank puller tool can't be screwed
> into it?

Force a wedge in between the crank and the bottom bracket, and hammer.

Sergio Pisa
 
G

GearóId Ó Laoi

Guest
If you remove the crank from the other side and then remove the bottom bracket, assuming you have
a one piece bottom bracket, this will take it off. You can also try violence, a touch of the
"shock and awe", or it is said , it you cycle on it for a while with the nut off, that it will
work its way off.

Try no 1. I've done it.
 
Q

Qui Si Parla Ca

Guest
Sergio-<< Force a wedge in between the crank and the bottom bracket, and hammer.

Automotive tie rod tool, also called a pickle fork-

Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
(303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
 
T

Tbgibb

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, "Dorian Smith" <[email protected]> writes:

>How do you remove a crank when the threads are stripped and a crank puller tool can't be
>screwed into it?

I made a plate to go behind the crank and use a harmonic balancer puller to remove the crank. Well,
that's not quite true, my teenage son used thing when it was time to remove the damaged crank from
his bike. The plate (of course) had holes drilled in it for the bolts from the puller along with a
slot to fit over the axle. .

Tom Gibb <[email protected]
 
A

A Muzi

Guest
"Dorian Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> How do you remove a crank when the threads are stripped and a crank puller tool can't be screwed
> into it?

There's the Var #932 which clips on the arm and pushes against the spindle. Consult your LBS. The
job only takes a moment with the right tool so it can't cost much.

If you needn't reuse the crank, a small propane torch will expand the aluminum crank much
faster than the steel spindle. Warm it and tap on the inside of the arm to let it fall into a
bucket of water.

--
Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
 
A

Alex Rodriguez

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
>Anybody like this? Dislike this? Cut old inner tubes and use them as liner underneath handlebar
>tape. Probably extra handlebar tape will be necessary, to accommodate the extra diameter.

This won't work well if you have smaller hands.
-----------------
Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
 
K

Ken

Guest
"Jeff" <[email protected]> wrote in news:U6wha.259$Uv1.22102085 @newssvr21.news.prodigy.com:
> Cut old inner tubes and use them as liner underneath handlebar tape.

People used to do this (maybe 20 or 30 years ago). Back then the standard handlebar tape was thin
cloth or plastic. Today, padded handlebar tapes are widely available and have the same effect.

Ken
 
M

Mike S.

Guest
"Alex Rodriguez" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> In article <[email protected]>,
[email protected]
> says...
> >Anybody like this? Dislike this? Cut old inner tubes and use them as liner underneath handlebar
> >tape. Probably extra handlebar tape will be necessary, to accommodate the extra diameter.
>
> This won't work well if you have smaller hands.
> -----------------
> Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
>
I saw an old video of the 7-11 team putting a longitudinal layer of bar tape under the wrapped tape
for Paris Roubaix. This would probably work better than an inner tube: more cushioning.

It increases the diameter of the gripping surface, but if it helps, go for
it.

Mike
 
M

Matt O'Toole

Guest
"Ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

> "Jeff" <[email protected]> wrote in
news:U6wha.259$Uv1.22102085
> @newssvr21.news.prodigy.com:

> > Cut old inner tubes and use them as liner underneath
handlebar tape.

> People used to do this (maybe 20 or 30 years ago). Back
then the standard
> handlebar tape was thin cloth or plastic. Today, padded
handlebar tapes are
> widely available and have the same effect.

There used to be a rubber handlebar tape sold by Scott. I used it once on one of those AT-2 MTB bars
and liked it a lot -- two layers under the regular grip area felt like a normal MTB grip. I haven't
seen the stuff for a long time though.

Matt O.
 
T

Thomas Reynolds

Guest
"Jeff" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> Anybody like this?
>
> Dislike this?
>
> Cut old inner tubes and use them as liner underneath handlebar tape.
>
> Probably extra handlebar tape will be necessary, to accommodate the extra diameter.

I like this idea for a paticular reason. I do ultra-marathon events and a great deal of my rides are
for many hours. Over the course of a year the sweat from my hands that soaks into the tape results
in that white aluminum corrosion on the surface of the handlebars. Perhaps if I properly wrap the
inner tube around the bars I can make it somewhat water tight. OTOH, any moisture that does get in
there may stay for a lot longer.

Tom
 
P

Paul Kopit

Guest
The tube is not really doesn't give much cushioning even if you use it like tape and wrap it. Dense
foam where you need it and not the pipe insulation stuff works better.

On Sun, 30 Mar 2003 06:27:00 GMT, "Jeff" <[email protected]> wrote:

>Anybody like this?
>
>Dislike this?
>
>Cut old inner tubes and use them as liner underneath handlebar tape.
>
>Probably extra handlebar tape will be necessary, to accommodate the extra diameter.
 
K

Ken

Guest
Paul Kopit <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

> The tube is not really doesn't give much cushioning even if you use it like tape and wrap it.
> Dense foam where you need it and not the pipe insulation stuff works better.

Some one was actually selling foam handlebar wraps back in the 1980s. You needed really big hands to
be comfortable with that stuff. The padded handlebar tapes that have been around for the last 10
years (either synthetic or cork) are much more versitile and also much easier to install.
 
D

David L. Johnso

Guest
On Wed, 02 Apr 2003 21:38:37 -0500, Ken wrote:

> Some one was actually selling foam handlebar wraps back in the 1980s. You needed really big hands
> to be comfortable with that stuff.

It's still sold, and some of us do have big hands. I tried the foam, but didn't like it. However, I
cut strips of it and put it under handlbar tape, and it does add some cushioning to the bars. For
me, just tape on the bars leaves them too thin for my comfort.

--

David L. Johnson

__o | And though I have the gift of prophecy, and understand all _`\(,_ | mysteries, and all
knowledge; and though I have all faith, so (_)/ (_) | that I could remove mountains, and have not
charity, I am nothing. [1 Corinth. 13:2]
 
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