removing broken spoke nipples

  • Thread starter Bellsouth Ijit 2.0
  • Start date



B

Bill Sornson

Guest
Michael Press wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>,
> "Bill Sornson" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>> Michael Press wrote:
>> {snip}
>>
>>> Using minuscule on proper names is misspelling, and
>>> ill-mannered when deliberate; except when it is one's own
>>> proper name.

>>
>> Learn the proper use of semi-colons; you ain't got it now.

>
> English usage and grammar is not a completely defined
> system. For instance, the use of the possessive mark in
> proper names and how to punctuate quotations cannot be
> universally defined. Many usages that are otherwise
> forbidden can be acceptable in particular
> circumstances; such as split infinitives. Semicolons
> are quite proper in place of a comma when the writer
> means to indicates a stronger break in the flow of a
> sentence.


You did it again. (Hint: you're "indicating a stronger break in the flow
of a sentence" where it's both unwarranted and not indicated.)

Bill "no big; deal" S.
 
B

Bill Sornson

Guest
Michael Press wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>,
> "Bill Sornson" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>> Michael Press wrote:
>> {snip}
>>
>>> Using minuscule on proper names is misspelling, and
>>> ill-mannered when deliberate; except when it is one's own
>>> proper name.

>>
>> Learn the proper use of semi-colons; you ain't got it now.

>
> English usage and grammar is not a completely defined
> system. For instance, the use of the possessive mark in
> proper names and how to punctuate quotations cannot be
> universally defined. Many usages that are otherwise
> forbidden can be acceptable in particular
> circumstances; such as split infinitives. Semicolons
> are quite proper in place of a comma when the writer
> means to indicates a stronger break in the flow of a
> sentence.


You did it again. (Hint: you're "indicating a stronger break in the flow
of a sentence" where it's both unwarranted and not indicated.)

Bill "no big; deal" S.
 
yo! visualize the wheel as a straight truss lacking a hub or a wheel
as a straight truss curved in a circle. contemporary buildings
designed with wood floors have floors supported by wooden trusses
similar to bicycle wheels. i'll go find one and post it.
but to answer the width height problem lookit the follo wing joist
table for joist (truss/rim) height and relationship to span.

http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/nreos/wood/ag-603.pdf
 
yeah- here's a truss site, see the bottom for hyperlinks


http://www.artruss.com/faqfloor.htm

i forget but guesstimate that adding an inch or worse 2 inches to a
2x8x8 for a 3x8x8 or 4x8x8 doesn't get the builder anywhere.
2x8x8 spans 10' with a normal floor load and say normal eastern
hemlock
3x8x8 isn't going to span 12' and a 4buh8 could make the 12' but be
weaker than a 2x10x8 (2'' wide 8''high 8 feet long.
mostly what the extra width does is add weight to the joist and
functional reduce strength by adding more weight than strength
wood and steel are roughly comparable materials for the purposes of
the discussion.

the domed rim is exactly thus-a dome. the dome was an architectural
wonder 1000 years ago. search the net. the spanish/arabs/jews built
unusual domes-very spoked possibley spooked yet the actaul dimensions
are small from the primitive materails
domes are too curvy to build from wood without a big ahssle but rim
aluminum that's a plus dome building material caws its melted in an
electric furnace and squirted thru a mold to form structural rim
members
 
M

Michael Press

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"Bill Sornson" <[email protected]> wrote:

> Michael Press wrote:
> > In article <[email protected]>,
> > "Bill Sornson" <[email protected]> wrote:
> >
> >> Michael Press wrote:
> >> {snip}
> >>
> >>> Using minuscule on proper names is misspelling, and
> >>> ill-mannered when deliberate; except when it is one's own
> >>> proper name.
> >>
> >> Learn the proper use of semi-colons; you ain't got it now.

> >
> > English usage and grammar is not a completely defined
> > system. For instance, the use of the possessive mark in
> > proper names and how to punctuate quotations cannot be
> > universally defined. Many usages that are otherwise
> > forbidden can be acceptable in particular
> > circumstances; such as split infinitives. Semicolons
> > are quite proper in place of a comma when the writer
> > means to indicates a stronger break in the flow of a
> > sentence.

>
> You did it again. (Hint: you're "indicating a stronger break in the flow
> of a sentence" where it's both unwarranted and not indicated.)


I am the author; therefore, it is my choice.
--
Michael Press
 
B

Bill Sornson

Guest
Michael Press wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>,
> "Bill Sornson" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>> Michael Press wrote:
>>> In article <[email protected]>,
>>> "Bill Sornson" <[email protected]> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Michael Press wrote:
>>>> {snip}
>>>>
>>>>> Using minuscule on proper names is misspelling, and
>>>>> ill-mannered when deliberate; except when it is one's own
>>>>> proper name.
>>>>
>>>> Learn the proper use of semi-colons; you ain't got it now.
>>>
>>> English usage and grammar is not a completely defined
>>> system. For instance, the use of the possessive mark in
>>> proper names and how to punctuate quotations cannot be
>>> universally defined. Many usages that are otherwise
>>> forbidden can be acceptable in particular
>>> circumstances; such as split infinitives. Semicolons
>>> are quite proper in place of a comma when the writer
>>> means to indicates a stronger break in the flow of a
>>> sentence.

>>
>> You did it again. (Hint: you're "indicating a stronger break in
>> the flow of a sentence" where it's both unwarranted and not
>> indicated.)

>
> I am the author; therefore, it is my choice.


FINALLY you get it.
 
B

Bill Sornson

Guest
Michael Press wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>,
> "Bill Sornson" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>> Michael Press wrote:
>>> In article <[email protected]>,
>>> "Bill Sornson" <[email protected]> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Michael Press wrote:
>>>> {snip}
>>>>
>>>>> Using minuscule on proper names is misspelling, and
>>>>> ill-mannered when deliberate; except when it is one's own
>>>>> proper name.
>>>>
>>>> Learn the proper use of semi-colons; you ain't got it now.
>>>
>>> English usage and grammar is not a completely defined
>>> system. For instance, the use of the possessive mark in
>>> proper names and how to punctuate quotations cannot be
>>> universally defined. Many usages that are otherwise
>>> forbidden can be acceptable in particular
>>> circumstances; such as split infinitives. Semicolons
>>> are quite proper in place of a comma when the writer
>>> means to indicates a stronger break in the flow of a
>>> sentence.

>>
>> You did it again. (Hint: you're "indicating a stronger break in
>> the flow of a sentence" where it's both unwarranted and not
>> indicated.)

>
> I am the author; therefore, it is my choice.


Now that's correct usage. Congrats!
 
A

A Muzi

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> yeah- here's a truss site, see the bottom for hyperlinks
>
>
> http://www.artruss.com/faqfloor.htm
>
> i forget but guesstimate that adding an inch or worse 2 inches to a
> 2x8x8 for a 3x8x8 or 4x8x8 doesn't get the builder anywhere.
> 2x8x8 spans 10' with a normal floor load and say normal eastern
> hemlock
> 3x8x8 isn't going to span 12' and a 4buh8 could make the 12' but be
> weaker than a 2x10x8 (2'' wide 8''high 8 feet long.
> mostly what the extra width does is add weight to the joist and
> functional reduce strength by adding more weight than strength
> wood and steel are roughly comparable materials for the purposes of
> the discussion.
>
> the domed rim is exactly thus-a dome. the dome was an architectural
> wonder 1000 years ago. search the net. the spanish/arabs/jews built
> unusual domes-very spoked possibley spooked yet the actaul dimensions
> are small from the primitive materails
> domes are too curvy to build from wood without a big ahssle but rim
> aluminum that's a plus dome building material caws its melted in an
> electric furnace and squirted thru a mold to form structural rim
> members
>

Try Romans, 2000 + years ago:
http://av.rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A9ibyK...anzalastminute.com/travel/rome-pantheon.shtml


--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org
Open every day since 1 April, 1971
 
here's a few brudge truss sites
the pennsylvania stone bridges are fantastic and off course the air
spaces are wheel spaces, inverse parsec. I missed one driving on the
wrong river side, maybe later.
there's RR bridge at the edge of the old reading railroad yard in
reading, pa mimics some designs found in colorado cyclist: if
remembering correctly, the abutment stone is laid in spirals forming
an arch within the truncated pyrimidial abutment. the reading bypass
bridge is, like the wheel, a curved truss bridge lies below the
hillclimb used by duryea for carriage testing.

http://www.brantacan.co.uk/truss.htm

Bridge Basics - A Spotter's Guide to Bridge Design

http://users.ce.ufl.edu/~historic/states/pa/paframe.htm

http://users.ce.ufl.edu/~historic/states/pa/paframe.htm
 
Data Koll? writes:

> here's a few brudge truss sites
> the pennsylvania stone bridges are fantastic and off course the air
> spaces are wheel spaces, inverse parsec. I missed one driving on the
> wrong river side, maybe later.
> there's RR bridge at the edge of the old reading railroad yard in
> reading, pa mimics some designs found in colorado cyclist: if
> remembering correctly, the abutment stone is laid in spirals forming
> an arch within the truncated pyrimidial abutment. the reading bypass
> bridge is, like the wheel, a curved truss bridge lies below the
> hillclimb used by duryea for carriage testing.


> http://www.brantacan.co.uk/truss.htm


> Bridge Basics - A Spotter's Guide to Bridge Design


> http://users.ce.ufl.edu/~historic/states/pa/paframe.htm


> http://users.ce.ufl.edu/~historic/states/pa/paframe.htm


Here are some other briges:

Arlberg RR at Pians:

http://mly.smugmug.com/gallery/1815091#90668355
http://mly.smugmug.com/gallery/1815091#90668496

Rhine river at Vaduz (FL)

http://mly.smugmug.com/gallery/1815091#90669177

Simplon concrete suspension bridge in a curve:

http://mly.smugmug.com/gallery/1815091#90669177

Diveria river at Domodossola:

http://www.paloaltobicycles.com/alps_photos/i08.html

Gotthard pass Fontana/Airolo

http://www.trentobike.org/Countries/Europe/Tour_Reports/Tour_of_the_Alps/Gallery/vertigo.jpg

Jobst Brandt
 
M

Michael Press

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"Bill Sornson" <[email protected]> wrote:

> Michael Press wrote:
> > In article <[email protected]>,
> > "Bill Sornson" <[email protected]> wrote:
> >
> >> Michael Press wrote:
> >>> In article <[email protected]>,
> >>> "Bill Sornson" <[email protected]> wrote:
> >>>
> >>>> Michael Press wrote:
> >>>> {snip}
> >>>>
> >>>>> Using minuscule on proper names is misspelling, and
> >>>>> ill-mannered when deliberate; except when it is one's own
> >>>>> proper name.
> >>>>
> >>>> Learn the proper use of semi-colons; you ain't got it now.
> >>>
> >>> English usage and grammar is not a completely defined
> >>> system. For instance, the use of the possessive mark in
> >>> proper names and how to punctuate quotations cannot be
> >>> universally defined. Many usages that are otherwise
> >>> forbidden can be acceptable in particular
> >>> circumstances; such as split infinitives. Semicolons
> >>> are quite proper in place of a comma when the writer
> >>> means to indicates a stronger break in the flow of a
> >>> sentence.
> >>
> >> You did it again. (Hint: you're "indicating a stronger break in
> >> the flow of a sentence" where it's both unwarranted and not
> >> indicated.)

> >
> > I am the author; therefore, it is my choice.

>
> FINALLY you get it.


No, I do not.
--
Michael Press
 
B

Bill Sornson

Guest
Michael Press wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>,
> "Bill Sornson" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>> Michael Press wrote:
>>> In article <[email protected]>,
>>> "Bill Sornson" <[email protected]> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Michael Press wrote:
>>>>> In article <[email protected]>,
>>>>> "Bill Sornson" <[email protected]> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> Michael Press wrote:
>>>>>> {snip}
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Using minuscule on proper names is misspelling, and
>>>>>>> ill-mannered when deliberate; except when it is one's own
>>>>>>> proper name.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Learn the proper use of semi-colons; you ain't got it now.
>>>>>
>>>>> English usage and grammar is not a completely defined
>>>>> system. For instance, the use of the possessive mark in
>>>>> proper names and how to punctuate quotations cannot be
>>>>> universally defined. Many usages that are otherwise
>>>>> forbidden can be acceptable in particular
>>>>> circumstances; such as split infinitives. Semicolons
>>>>> are quite proper in place of a comma when the writer
>>>>> means to indicates a stronger break in the flow of a
>>>>> sentence.
>>>>
>>>> You did it again. (Hint: you're "indicating a stronger break in
>>>> the flow of a sentence" where it's both unwarranted and not
>>>> indicated.)
>>>
>>> I am the author; therefore, it is my choice.

>>
>> FINALLY you get it.

>
> No, I do not.


LOL

Bill "who says Press doesn't have; a sense of humor" S.
 
A

A Muzi

Guest
> Data Koll? writes:
>> here's a few brudge truss sites
>> the pennsylvania stone bridges are fantastic and off course the air
>> spaces are wheel spaces, inverse parsec. I missed one driving on the
>> wrong river side, maybe later.
>> there's RR bridge at the edge of the old reading railroad yard in
>> reading, pa mimics some designs found in colorado cyclist: if
>> remembering correctly, the abutment stone is laid in spirals forming
>> an arch within the truncated pyrimidial abutment. the reading bypass
>> bridge is, like the wheel, a curved truss bridge lies below the
>> hillclimb used by duryea for carriage testing.
>> http://www.brantacan.co.uk/truss.htm
>> Bridge Basics - A Spotter's Guide to Bridge Design
>> http://users.ce.ufl.edu/~historic/states/pa/paframe.htm
>> http://users.ce.ufl.edu/~historic/states/pa/paframe.htm


[email protected] wrote:
> Here are some other briges:
> Arlberg RR at Pians:
> http://mly.smugmug.com/gallery/1815091#90668355
> http://mly.smugmug.com/gallery/1815091#90668496
> Rhine river at Vaduz (FL)
> http://mly.smugmug.com/gallery/1815091#90669177
> Simplon concrete suspension bridge in a curve:
> http://mly.smugmug.com/gallery/1815091#90669177
> Diveria river at Domodossola:
> http://www.paloaltobicycles.com/alps_photos/i08.html
> Gotthard pass Fontana/Airolo
> http://www.trentobike.org/Countries/Europe/Tour_Reports/Tour_of_the_Alps/Gallery/vertigo.jpg


As your Simplon link is a repeat of the Vaduz link, I went looking and
very happily found this amazing page:
http://www.ketchum.org/bridges.html

so, thanks!
--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org
Open every day since 1 April, 1971
 
The tay bridge as tacoed wheel
http://taybridgedisaster.co.uk/
appears as: a carpenter's temporary structure, a ham radio operator's
tower WITH GUY WIRES, and the ultimate railroad bridge taco. Is that a
TACO wheel or what? Our perspective, and the engineers' decision
making process of industrial revolution England and 21 century America
are probabbbly radically different but check out the last link for
comparison
The 'weakest link' iron towers were apparently replaced with
uncompressible stone when side loaded by wind.
http://www.answers.com/topic/tay2-jpg
http://www.flickr.com/photos/magdalengreen/127849602
leading to the Colorado cyclist type bridge-and early American
ironworks bridges as:
http://www.forthbridges.org.uk/railbridgemain.htm

off to the Overseas Heritage Trail

http://firstboat.schoolreference.com/seven-mile-bridge-florida-keys-2.html

http://209.85.165.104/search?q=cach...ys+bridge+photograph&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=4&gl=us
 
J

Johnson

Guest
On Sat, 3 Mar 2007 07:20:56 -0500, Bellsouth Ijit 2.0 wrote:

> I've inherited a mtb wheelset with half a dozen broken nipples for the rear
> and a couple for the front (no broken spokes, just the nipples). Some
> nipples (brass) are broken where a spoke wrench would engage and just won't
> come off. Any idea how I can get them off the spokes without cutting them?
> I've tried pliers, but the broken nipples are frozen to the spokes. TIA.


Cut the spokes, pull them out, and replace. Not sure why this thread has
300 messages of ****, but that's usenet for you.
 
RE: they've been waiting for you

been to OUGH, NEBRASKA ?

type ough into google maps
place zoom bar at midpoint
resolve ough, noticing ough is not at an intersection, then tap
hybird
ough!!