Removing rear cassette, cheap bike

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Tj Poseno, May 29, 2003.

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  1. Tj Poseno

    Tj Poseno Guest

    I want to remove the cassette off of a cheap wal mart bike, i know that i need a chain tool, but do
    I have to remove th freewheel? Or jsut the gears?
     
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  2. Ron Hardin

    Ron Hardin Guest

    TJ Poseno wrote:
    >
    > I want to remove the cassette off of a cheap wal mart bike, i know that i need a chain tool, but
    > do I have to remove th freewheel? Or jsut the gears?

    If it's a _freewheel_ you need the tool that fits that freewheel to unscrew it, and a well secured
    vise somewhere to hold it while you turn the wheel. Usually only the obvious dropout nut needs to be
    removed from the axle to use the tool.

    Grease the threads on the new freewheel you put on and it will be easier next time to take it off.

    If it's a _cassette_, I can't help you; I've never had to deal with one.
    --
    Ron Hardin [email protected]

    On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
     
  3. On 29 May 2003 12:31:10 -0700, [email protected] (TJ Poseno) wrote:

    >I want to remove the cassette off of a cheap wal mart bike, i know that i need a chain tool, but do
    >I have to remove th freewheel? Or jsut the gears?

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/k7.html : Is it a cassette or a freewheel? And if so, of what type?

    Jasper
     
  4. Tj Poseno

    Tj Poseno Guest

    I was just trying to remove the cassette, and got it off, but WOW, was that on tight. I wasnt
    looking to salvage any of the gears so I just used a pipe wrench on the threaded gear. with a 3ft
    section of pipe off of that and a 2 foot section to hold 1st gear with a hommade chain wip. BROKE a
    chain trying to get it off. Guess after a while (with no rust)they liek to stay on. Had to tighten a
    bit to break it loose then it came loose.

    I need to take a cassette of another biek with no damage. Does anyone here have any links to any
    places that have a hommade chain wip, mine wasnt to gentle.

    Or ill just go on my own by looking at others
     
  5. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

  6. [email protected] (TJ Poseno) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I was just trying to remove the cassette, and got it off, but WOW, was that on tight. I wasnt
    > looking to salvage any of the gears so I just used a pipe wrench on the threaded gear. with a 3ft
    > section of pipe off of that and a 2 foot section to hold 1st gear with a hommade chain wip. BROKE
    > a chain trying to get it off. Guess after a while (with no rust)they liek to stay on. Had to
    > tighten a bit to break it loose then it came loose.

    My understanding is that Shimano changed the design to a lockring rather than a threaded small
    spocket to avoid this problem.

    As on a freewheel, when you ride the threaded sprocket tightens, becoming harder to remove. This is
    prevented by having all the sprockets splined and retained by an additional lockring.

    I assume you have checked the method of attachment on the other bike.

    Sometimes applying a shock will loosen things up abit - a sharp tap with a hammer on your extension
    handle - this has been known to work where other methods fail. It certainly worked for me when
    freeing up a jammed tap on my colleagues electosamovar, but that is somewhat OT here.

    >
    > I need to take a cassette of another biek with no damage. Does anyone here have any links to any
    > places that have a hommade chain wip, mine wasnt to gentle.

    I use a length of old chain attached to a right angle shelf bracket. I then place the right angle
    bracket over the wheel rim (suitably protected) and wrap the chain around the sprockets. Removing
    the lock ring first takes up any slack in the chain, then tensions it by pulling the bracket against
    the rim. For threaded sprocket type you will need two chainwhips.

    ===¬
    : ; ; ;
    :

    In this diagram : is wheel, ===¬, angle bracket and ; old chain.
     
  7. On Fri, 30 May 2003 13:46:36 GMT, "Jeff" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Here's a clear picture of the Park chain whip you could copy
    >
    >http://www.parktool.com/tools/HCW_14.shtml

    I thought about making my own, piece of aluminium bar stock, drill three holes, insert old pieces of
    chain using chain press, but then I got to the local car-and-bike-emporium type shop and saw they
    had them for like 6-7 euros. Not worth the effort for me.

    Jasper
     
  8. On 30 May 2003 08:52:55 -0700, [email protected] (Andrew Webster) wrote:

    >My understanding is that Shimano changed the design to a lockring rather than a threaded small
    >spocket to avoid this problem.

    I think that might have just been because they moved to Hyperglide -- hyperglide needs the teeth on
    the cassette/freewheel aligned, and you can't do that when the smallest ones screw on, you just
    can't guarantee the teeth end up where they should. I've got a Shimano hyperglide freewheel that
    uses a lockring, so it's not just for freehubs.

    >As on a freewheel, when you ride the threaded sprocket tightens, becoming harder to remove. This is
    >prevented by having all the sprockets splined and retained by an additional lockring.

    I'd say, side benefit, rather than actual reason.

    Jasper
     
  9. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Jasper Janssen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Fri, 30 May 2003 13:46:36 GMT, "Jeff" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Here's a clear picture of the Park chain whip you could copy
    > >
    > >http://www.parktool.com/tools/HCW_14.shtml
    >
    > I thought about making my own, piece of aluminium bar stock, drill three holes, insert old pieces
    > of chain using chain press, but then I got to the local car-and-bike-emporium type shop and saw
    > they had them for like 6-7 euros. Not worth the effort for me.

    I just wrapped an old chain over the top of a 1" x 2", 18" scrap of wood, fastened with a couple of
    screws. When I wrap it around the largest sprocket the teeth dig into the wood for a little extra
    grab. Works fine for cassettes.
     
  10. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > On Fri, 30 May 2003 13:46:36 GMT, "Jeff" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >Here's a clear picture of the Park chain whip you could copy
    > >http://www.parktool.com/tools/HCW_14.shtml

    "Jasper Janssen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I thought about making my own, piece of aluminium bar stock, drill three holes, insert old pieces
    > of chain using chain press, but then I got to the local car-and-bike-emporium type shop and saw
    > they had them for like 6-7 euros. Not worth the effort for me.

    The rivets tear out of steel ones regularly. I don't think aluminum thin enough to fit betwen the
    sideplates would be strong enough.

    http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfromthepast/CHAINSTK.JPG

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  11. On Fri, 30 May 2003 23:11:26 -0500, "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >The rivets tear out of steel ones regularly. I don't think aluminum thin enough to fit betwen the
    >sideplates would be strong enough.

    Hmm, okay. Well, I would have figured that out eventually.

    Jasper
     
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