removing rear wheel from bike



B

Ben

Guest
Ok I admit, most people here will think I am a jerk for asking this
question, but I need advice.

On my road bike, I got a flat tyre the other day ( Rear )
Ok, I got the wheel of, put it in the smallest gear, no problem.
But could I get the wheel back on ??? NO way, after I covered my hands in
grease, and made a mess of my new bike, I tried over 10 times, untill I
finally got it back on.
It was very frustrating to say the least.

Guys, please tell me any secrets in making this job easy, as I dred my next
rear flat tyre.

Do you lay the bike on the ground, upside down ???

I know once you get the knack, its like pumping up a tyre, but I am far from
getting the knack.
Please advise me on how its done the esay way.

A bery big thankyou,
Ben
 
A

atacca

Guest
I lay it upside down, being very careful to lay it down as smooth as
possible so I don't rub the seat or handlebars (the front light takes some
of the abuse away from the handlebar thankfully). I haven't escaped the
grease problem either. I only cycle to work and for rec so I have time to
change a flat so I use as little surface area on my fingers as possible when
touching the chain, I don't get too many flats so the grease has never been
a big problem.

Be interesting to hear how others do it.


"Ben" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
> Ok I admit, most people here will think I am a jerk for asking this
> question, but I need advice.
>
> On my road bike, I got a flat tyre the other day ( Rear )
> Ok, I got the wheel of, put it in the smallest gear, no problem.
> But could I get the wheel back on ??? NO way, after I covered my hands in
> grease, and made a mess of my new bike, I tried over 10 times, untill I
> finally got it back on.
> It was very frustrating to say the least.
>
> Guys, please tell me any secrets in making this job easy, as I dred my

next
> rear flat tyre.
>
> Do you lay the bike on the ground, upside down ???
>
> I know once you get the knack, its like pumping up a tyre, but I am far

from
> getting the knack.
> Please advise me on how its done the esay way.
>
> A bery big thankyou,
> Ben
>
>
 
S

Steve

Guest
& remember always pump the valve at 12 o'clock not 6 o'clock as I see so
many people doing , no wonder so many presta valves get snapped. Also it
helps to support your leading elbow against the top of your thigh to steady
your pumping style.
Steve @ IDEAL


"atacca" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> I lay it upside down, being very careful to lay it down as smooth as
> possible so I don't rub the seat or handlebars (the front light takes some
> of the abuse away from the handlebar thankfully). I haven't escaped the
> grease problem either. I only cycle to work and for rec so I have time to
> change a flat so I use as little surface area on my fingers as possible

when
> touching the chain, I don't get too many flats so the grease has never

been
> a big problem.
>
> Be interesting to hear how others do it.
>
>
> "Ben" <[email protected]> wrote in message

news:[email protected]
> > Ok I admit, most people here will think I am a jerk for asking this
> > question, but I need advice.
> >
> > On my road bike, I got a flat tyre the other day ( Rear )
> > Ok, I got the wheel of, put it in the smallest gear, no problem.
> > But could I get the wheel back on ??? NO way, after I covered my hands

in
> > grease, and made a mess of my new bike, I tried over 10 times, untill I
> > finally got it back on.
> > It was very frustrating to say the least.
> >
> > Guys, please tell me any secrets in making this job easy, as I dred my

> next
> > rear flat tyre.
> >
> > Do you lay the bike on the ground, upside down ???
> >
> > I know once you get the knack, its like pumping up a tyre, but I am far

> from
> > getting the knack.
> > Please advise me on how its done the esay way.
> >
> > A bery big thankyou,
> > Ben
> >
> >

>
>
 
A

atacca

Guest
Haven't heard that one. Could you expand on that please. What is "12
o'clock"? What I do is place the wheel against the ground so the bottom of
the pump is on the ground so I can lean my body into it and know that the
valve will not move, plus have the added benefit of using my body weight,
not arm strength.


"Steve" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> & remember always pump the valve at 12 o'clock not 6 o'clock as I see so
> many people doing , no wonder so many presta valves get snapped. Also it
> helps to support your leading elbow against the top of your thigh to

steady
> your pumping style.
> Steve @ IDEAL
>
>
> "atacca" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> > I lay it upside down, being very careful to lay it down as smooth as
> > possible so I don't rub the seat or handlebars (the front light takes

some
> > of the abuse away from the handlebar thankfully). I haven't escaped the
> > grease problem either. I only cycle to work and for rec so I have time

to
> > change a flat so I use as little surface area on my fingers as possible

> when
> > touching the chain, I don't get too many flats so the grease has never

> been
> > a big problem.
> >
> > Be interesting to hear how others do it.
> >
> >
> > "Ben" <[email protected]> wrote in message

> news:[email protected]
> > > Ok I admit, most people here will think I am a jerk for asking this
> > > question, but I need advice.
> > >
> > > On my road bike, I got a flat tyre the other day ( Rear )
> > > Ok, I got the wheel of, put it in the smallest gear, no problem.
> > > But could I get the wheel back on ??? NO way, after I covered my hands

> in
> > > grease, and made a mess of my new bike, I tried over 10 times, untill

I
> > > finally got it back on.
> > > It was very frustrating to say the least.
> > >
> > > Guys, please tell me any secrets in making this job easy, as I dred

my
> > next
> > > rear flat tyre.
> > >
> > > Do you lay the bike on the ground, upside down ???
> > >
> > > I know once you get the knack, its like pumping up a tyre, but I am

far
> > from
> > > getting the knack.
> > > Please advise me on how its done the esay way.
> > >
> > > A bery big thankyou,
> > > Ben
> > >
> > >

> >
> >

>
>
 
D

DRS

Guest
"atacca" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Haven't heard that one. Could you expand on that please. What is "12
> o'clock"? What I do is place the wheel against the ground so the
> bottom of the pump is on the ground so I can lean my body into it and
> know that the valve will not move, plus have the added benefit of
> using my body weight, not arm strength.


Please don't top-post.

Bottom vs. top posting and quotation style on Usenet
http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/usenet/brox.html

Why is Bottom-posting better than Top-posting
http://www.caliburn.nl/topposting.html

http://www.blakjak.demon.co.uk/gey_stv0.htm

http://www.fscked.co.uk/writing/top-posting-cuss.html

--

A: Top-posters.
Q: What is the most annoying thing on Usenet?
 
S

Steve

Guest
You mean bottom post (6 o'clock) pumping is better than top post (12
o'clock) pumping! :)
Steve @ IDEAL


"DRS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> "atacca" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> > Haven't heard that one. Could you expand on that please. What is "12
> > o'clock"? What I do is place the wheel against the ground so the
> > bottom of the pump is on the ground so I can lean my body into it and
> > know that the valve will not move, plus have the added benefit of
> > using my body weight, not arm strength.

>
> Please don't top-post.
>
> Bottom vs. top posting and quotation style on Usenet
> http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/usenet/brox.html
>
> Why is Bottom-posting better than Top-posting
> http://www.caliburn.nl/topposting.html
>
> http://www.blakjak.demon.co.uk/gey_stv0.htm
>
> http://www.fscked.co.uk/writing/top-posting-cuss.html
>
> --
>
> A: Top-posters.
> Q: What is the most annoying thing on Usenet?
>
>
 

flyingdutch

New Member
Feb 8, 2004
5,700
0
0
Ben said:
Ok I admit, most people here will think I am a jerk for asking this
question, but I need advice.

On my road bike, I got a flat tyre the other day ( Rear )
Ok, I got the wheel of, put it in the smallest gear, no problem.
But could I get the wheel back on ??? NO way, after I covered my hands in
grease, and made a mess of my new bike, I tried over 10 times, untill I
finally got it back on.
It was very frustrating to say the least.

Guys, please tell me any secrets in making this job easy, as I dred my next
rear flat tyre.

Do you lay the bike on the ground, upside down ???

I know once you get the knack, its like pumping up a tyre, but I am far from
getting the knack.
Please advise me on how its done the esay way.

A bery big thankyou,
Ben
before taking wheel out, put chain onto smallest cog (which is what I assume you meant by smallest gear). Once repaired, etc pt wheel in and get in between brake arms and hen pull back into/onto chain and then rear dropout/s. bit of a knack to it, but once you've nailed it, it all makes sense. Still dont understand how those neutral Mavic wheel guys in the TdF do it in 5secs tho...
 
A

atacca

Guest
> Please don't top-post.
>
> A: Top-posters.
> Q: What is the most annoying thing on Usenet?
>


Roger. Good point, questionably presented (to me only, maybe). Being new
to newsgroups I thought top posting was replying _above_ the original
message, not replying with the _quotes_ below your reply.

Point taken on board and never to be repeated, thanks.

Atacca.
 
T

Terry Collins

Guest
Ben wrote:

> Do you lay the bike on the ground, upside down ???


Spread rag/coat/whatsit on ground.
Turn bike turtle with seat on rag/etc.
Sping pedals to check bike in lowest gear.
Release brakes.
Pull now lowest jockey wheel back to reduce amount of chain in contact
with cluster.
Release quick release/undo nuts.
Remove wheel, forwards/away, up and to right to clear chain.
Repair punture and reverse steps.

Wipe hands with rag.

Actually, I'm a tourer and it usually starts with select nice spot for
cuppa, move bicycle to nice spot, set up trangia to boil water, then
repair punture {:)
 
H

hippy

Guest
"Terry Collins" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Spread rag/coat/whatsit on ground.


Meh.. I like the 'trashed race bike' look :)

> Turn bike turtle with seat on rag/etc.


Yeah, upside-down, sitting on bars and saddle.

> Sping pedals to check bike in lowest gear.


Why?

> Release brakes.


There's quick release levers on better Shimano stuff. Just
remember to put them back to the right position! :)

> Pull now lowest jockey wheel back to reduce amount of chain in contact
> with cluster.


Why?

> Release quick release/undo nuts.


Right..

> Remove wheel, forwards/away, up and to right to clear chain.
> Repair punture and reverse steps.
>
> Wipe hands with rag.


What's all this 'lowest gear' stuff? I can take the wheel out
without touching the chain with my hands and with the
chain on a middle cog.. ???

Release brake quick release
Flip bike upside-down
Undo wheel quick release
Pull wheel up (assuming normal vertical dropouts)
Push wheel back down.. lean to side and wiggle to
drop chain off the cassette. (It IS often quicker to just lift
the chain with a finger at this point, but you can hardly call
that getting very greasy!)
Pull wheel free and fix puncture.
Reverse for fitting, using the QR "knob" to lift the chain up.

Oh, if you HAVE to move the chain.. use a stick or
something to stop dirty hands?

hippy
 

Greg-O

New Member
Aug 24, 2003
163
0
0
invest in a bike stand. it makes stuff like this a ton easier.

and for avoiding greasy hands, use a rag to grab the chain
 
J

Jack Russell

Guest
Ben wrote:

>Ok I admit, most people here will think I am a jerk for asking this
>question, but I need advice.
>
>On my road bike, I got a flat tyre the other day ( Rear )
>Ok, I got the wheel of, put it in the smallest gear, no problem.
>But could I get the wheel back on ??? NO way, after I covered my hands in
>grease, and made a mess of my new bike, I tried over 10 times, untill I
>finally got it back on.
>It was very frustrating to say the least.
>
>Guys, please tell me any secrets in making this job easy, as I dred my next
>rear flat tyre.
>
>Do you lay the bike on the ground, upside down ???
>
>I know once you get the knack, its like pumping up a tyre, but I am far from
>getting the knack.
>Please advise me on how its done the esay way.
>
>A bery big thankyou,
>Ben
>
>
>
>

Carry a couple of "surgical gloves". They are cheap as chips and
disposable. Failing that you can do it with a bit of rag but ....

--
Remove norubbish to reply direct

Jack Russell
 

ritcho

New Member
May 24, 2004
934
0
0
Jack Russell said:
Ben wrote:

>Ok I admit, most people here will think I am a jerk for asking this
>question, but I need advice.
>
>On my road bike, I got a flat tyre the other day ( Rear )
>Ok, I got the wheel of, put it in the smallest gear, no problem.
>But could I get the wheel back on ??? NO way, after I covered my hands in
>grease, and made a mess of my new bike, I tried over 10 times, untill I
>finally got it back on.
>It was very frustrating to say the least.
>
>Guys, please tell me any secrets in making this job easy, as I dred my next
>rear flat tyre.
>
>Do you lay the bike on the ground, upside down ???
>
>I know once you get the knack, its like pumping up a tyre, but I am far from
>getting the knack.
>Please advise me on how its done the esay way.
>
>A bery big thankyou,
>Ben
>
>
>
>

Carry a couple of "surgical gloves". They are cheap as chips and
disposable. Failing that you can do it with a bit of rag but ....

--
Remove norubbish to reply direct

Jack Russell

You stole my suggestion! Gloves are an _excellent_ device for keeping hands clean. I don't want to arrive at work with black hands after fixing a flat.

Ok, here's another one. As you begin re-installing the wheel, rest the sprockets on the chain and you'll find that the derailer is in the way, between the axle and the dropout. Pull the derailer back a little so the cassette clears it and voila! Wheel is in.

Ritch
 
T

Terry Collins

Guest

> > Spin (ed) pedals to check bike in lowest gear.

>
> Why?


Because when you put it back, you need to spin the wheel again to check
you've put it back centred, doesn't rub, etc.

> > Pull now lowest jockey wheel back to reduce amount of chain in contact
> > with cluster.

>
> Why?


On my bike, there is a fair bit of chain wrap around rear. This unwraps
a bit of it. Actually makes it easier to get back in more than anything.

>
> What's all this 'lowest gear' stuff? I can take the wheel out
> without touching the chain with my hands and with the
> chain on a middle cog.. ???


That is on your bicycle. Let me guess, tight range rear cluster, with
52-40 triple on front?

I run 36/34 to 13/14 rear cluster with 40-26 triple. there is a bit of
chain about.


....snip.....

> Oh, if you HAVE to move the chain.. use a stick or
> something to stop dirty hands?


It is okay, I'm a man, I don't mind a little bit of grease {:)
It gives me an excuse to use hand cream <VBG>
 
T

Terry Collins

Guest
Greg-O wrote:
>
> invest in a bike stand. it makes stuff like this a ton easier.


I've got two of those at home.
It is quicker just to flip the bike and do it.
Especially when you are out on the road.
 
B

BCL

Guest
On Fri, 6 Aug 2004 21:48:59 +1000, "Ben" <[email protected]> wrote:


>On my road bike, I got a flat tyre the other day ( Rear )
>Ok, I got the wheel of, put it in the smallest gear, no problem.
>But could I get the wheel back on ??? NO way, after I covered my hands in
>grease, and made a mess of my new bike, I tried over 10 times, untill I
>finally got it back on.


If you have no grease on your chain then you can't get it on your
hands. There will be howls of protest but try using parafin wax on
your chain every two or three months. You clean the chain in a solvent
(I use petrol but you can expect more howls about that) then dunk it
in molten wax. There are other more expensive dry lubs too.

Depending on how much riding you do you may even have to change the
chain more often but chains are cheap enough. Personally I change my
chain every year but have never got near 1/16" over a foot stretch.


Regards
Bruce

www.bcl.id.au
 

mfhor

New Member
Jun 15, 2004
450
0
0
Ben said:
Ok I admit, most people here will think I am a jerk for asking this
question, but I need advice.

On my road bike, I got a flat tyre the other day ( Rear )
Ok, I got the wheel of, put it in the smallest gear, no problem.
But could I get the wheel back on ??? NO way, after I covered my hands in
grease, and made a mess of my new bike, I tried over 10 times, untill I
finally got it back on.
It was very frustrating to say the least.

Guys, please tell me any secrets in making this job easy, as I dred my next
rear flat tyre.

Do you lay the bike on the ground, upside down ???

I know once you get the knack, its like pumping up a tyre, but I am far from
getting the knack.
Please advise me on how its done the esay way.

A bery big thankyou,
Ben
Don't listen to those other clowns ;) This is how REAL ;) race mechanics change a rear wheel

Flip open the brake QR. Stand on the NDS (non drive side). Face the rear wheel. Lift the rear of the bike one (left) handed with the DS seatstay. Bend over so the seat is in your abdomen. Got it?

Undo the QR lever with your free hand. Swap your free hand to the drive side. Twist derailleur parallelogram backwards. Give the bike a good shake. If the wheel is installed correctly, it should drop out, hence the term "dropouts" for where the wheel goes in. If not, undo the QR nut a few turns and give the wheel a good wallop on the tyre at 12 to 2 o'clock. Still no good? We're into workshop territory now. Undo the QR all the way and take it out. Pull the seatstays apart with your mighty biceps. Still no good? Get a friend to do all the above wheel manipulation while you pull the seatstays apart with your mighty biceps. If no good, swap spots. If still no good, smash bike with large hammer, until frustration is righteously assuaged.

If any of the above, short of the righteous anger, works, check the clearance in the dropout slots - should be +- 11mm. File or bend the slot apart (gently! snappage can occur!) to fit the wheel axle ends - slide the wheel in and out a few times to check.

Some bikes' derailleur hangers are designed to frustrate easy wheel removal. Not much you can do about this. Buy a new frame? What a handy excuse . . .

M "The devil lies in the frame design detail"H
 
G

GDS

Guest
"Ben" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
> Ok I admit, most people here will think I am a jerk for asking this
> question, but I need advice.
>
> On my road bike, I got a flat tyre the other day ( Rear )
> Ok, I got the wheel of, put it in the smallest gear, no problem.
> But could I get the wheel back on ??? NO way, after I covered my hands in
> grease, and made a mess of my new bike, I tried over 10 times, untill I
> finally got it back on.
> It was very frustrating to say the least.
>
> Guys, please tell me any secrets in making this job easy, as I dred my next
> rear flat tyre.
>
> Do you lay the bike on the ground, upside down ???
>
> I know once you get the knack, its like pumping up a tyre, but I am far from
> getting the knack.
> Please advise me on how its done the esay way.
>
> A bery big thankyou,
> Ben
>
>


Here it is...
Don't bother changing gears mate, just remember the one you were in when you stopped.
Turn the bike on it's reverse (this is simply to make it easier to work on).
Undo the quick release and pull the wheel out.
Replace tube/fix puncture(as if#2!).
Replace wheel and ride away happy.

If you ride a MTB you may also have to free the brakes.

I don't see how you can get greasy doing the above chore, we all do it at some stage.

G.
 

hippy

New Member
Sep 5, 2003
1,806
0
0
43
>Terry Collins
>>hippy
>> What's all this 'lowest gear' stuff? I can take the wheel out
>> without touching the chain with my hands and with the
>> chain on a middle cog.. ???[/color]
>
>That is on your bicycle. Let me guess, tight range rear cluster, with
>52-40 triple on front?

Something like that, yeah..

>I run 36/34 to 13/14 rear cluster with 40-26 triple. there is a bit of
>chain about.

Ahh.. ok, that makes more sense.

Hey, if you have two work stands and don't use them.. I know
where you can send them :)

hippy
 
G

Gags

Guest
"Ben" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
> Ok I admit, most people here will think I am a jerk for asking this
> question, but I need advice.
>
> On my road bike, I got a flat tyre the other day ( Rear )
> Ok, I got the wheel of, put it in the smallest gear, no problem.
> But could I get the wheel back on ??? NO way, after I covered my hands in
> grease, and made a mess of my new bike, I tried over 10 times, untill I
> finally got it back on.
> It was very frustrating to say the least.
>
> Guys, please tell me any secrets in making this job easy, as I dred my

next
> rear flat tyre.
>
> Do you lay the bike on the ground, upside down ???
>
> I know once you get the knack, its like pumping up a tyre, but I am far

from
> getting the knack.
> Please advise me on how its done the esay way.
>
> A bery big thankyou,
> Ben
>

I have never, ever turned the bike upside down......seems silly as I am sure
that it must be harder to pull the wheel out than to drop it out......here
is my tried and true technique.....

I keep bike upright and stand on off-drive side. Shift to 2nd smallest cog
(I got in this habit after having a bike with a lug on the drive side seat
stay that I could put the chain over so that it stayed in place for
replacement of the wheel), release brakes, release QR skewer, lean over back
wheel and pivot derallieur to the rear......wheel generally drops out at
this point (may need a slight tap on the top with palm sometimes). Grab
wheel and shimmy it outside the loop of the chain, lay bike on LHS so chain
is off the ground.

I then replace the tube, pump it up whilst still off the bike and then pick
up the bike and pretty well reverse the process. I always apply downwards
pressure on the seat before tightening the QR skewer to make sure that the
wheel is seated properly in the dropouts. I also grab and release the rear
brakes a couple of times and then check that they are clearing the rim (ie.
the wheel is in straight).

At no stage in the process do I touch the chain!!!! I only touch the
deraillieur which is usually fairly clean but I do carry a small rag in my
seat bag (about 15 cm x 15cm) that stops tools from rattling and is great to
use to grab the deraillieur.

Ride On,

Gags