removing rear wheel from bike



T

Terry Collins

Guest
hippy wrote:

....snip...

> Hey, if you have two work stands and don't use them.. I know
> where you can send them :)


Woops, sprung. {:)

The first one is my bike rack (Macrell?) when I mount it on the tow
ball.

The second one is the broken one that I am currently in the process of
building a ground frame for. It snapped one of the legs, so the other
was cut off to match. The ground frame will be a serriffed H (think
fonts) on the groud with two posts. Made from bits of old pipe that are
mitred and which I am part way through welding up. The delay atm is
whether to go with a high style (top bar at shoulder height) which is
easy to work on chain, etc, or a lower height so I don't have to lift
the bike that far.
 
G

Gemma Kernich

Guest
"hippy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>>

> Yeah, upside-down, sitting on bars and saddle.
>

It's easier IMHO, to get the wheel out with the bike the right way up....


> > Sping pedals to check bike in lowest gear.

>
> Why?
>


Less chain tension, easier to put back in, you don't need to touch the
chain, ever.

> > Release brakes.

>
> There's quick release levers on better Shimano stuff. Just
> remember to put them back to the right position! :)


And on the brake levers on Campy stuff....

>>
> > Remove wheel, forwards/away, up and to right to clear chain.
> > Repair punture and reverse steps.
> >


If you've got the bike the right way up, and conventional drop outs, just
push the wheel towards the seattube till it clears the lugs, then lift frame
up (away from the wheel).
The trick is to use your right index finger (assuming you're standing behind
the bike) to push the bottom jockey cage down and forward (there's actually
a little tab on the back of shimano changer on the bottom jocket wheels,
that's the spot to push).
That pushes a lot of slack in the chain, and the wheel is easy to remove.

The turn bike into the 'turtle' position, fix puncture etc.


> > Wipe hands with rag.

>


Shouldn't have to touch the chain...


> What's all this 'lowest gear' stuff? I can take the wheel out
> without touching the chain with my hands and with the
> chain on a middle cog.. ???


Putting the wheel back on in reverse of what I said means you never have to
touch the chain, with your fingers, or a stick, or a rag.... Put press the
bottom jockey tab again to slacken the chain, put wheel in from the back
again, line up wheel so chain will go on the smallest cog, drop frame down
onto the wheel and it seats itself. DO up QR.
Doesn't work real well if you're not in the smallest gear, casue you have to
press the rear changer a lot more towards the front for this to work.
I can take a wheel out in less than 2 secs...\
Gemm
 
R

Random Data

Guest
"hippy" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

> There's quick release levers on better Shimano stuff. Just
> remember to put them back to the right position! :)


No there aren't. The better stuff doesn't *need* QRs. The next best
has a cable that needs to be popped out. Then you get into that roadie
stuff :)

> What's all this 'lowest gear' stuff?


By putting the chain on the smallest cog (at the back) you minimise
the chain tension and you also make it easier to align the chain when
you put it back on. Then again, I normally don't bother on my bikes.
Take a guess where the chain was, whack the wheel in, spin the pedals
to get the right gear (before you take off in a storm of crunching).

Dave - who is liking the light in the morning.

--
Dave Hughes | [email protected]
"Powerful, cryptic and dangerous, plus a command line entry that looks
like line noise. What's not to love?" - Robert Sneddon, on G=C800:5
 

hippy

New Member
Sep 5, 2003
1,806
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>Gemma Kernich
>It's easier IMHO, to get the wheel out with the bike the right way up....

Assuming you don't have a follow car with spare wheels.. what do you do
with the bike once you've taken out the wheel? You have to put it down,
right? I'd rather rest my bike on the bars and the saddle than sit the
chainrings and derrailer on the ground..

>> > Sping pedals to check bike in lowest gear.[/color]
>>
>> Why?
>
>Less chain tension, easier to put back in, you don't need to touch the
>chain, ever.

I never remember to change to smallest and I seem to manage okay :)


>>
> > Remove wheel, forwards/away, up and to right to clear chain.
> > Repair punture and reverse steps.
> >


>The turn bike into the 'turtle' position, fix puncture etc.

So you have to turn it upside down anyway.. may as well do it to start
with. No difference in removing the wheel in my experiences, though I
usually do it with the bike upside-down.

I don't usually do quick changes racing mostly crits. If I puncture it's
probably race-over unless I can find a whole spare wheel to suit. I might
try your method the next time I puncture (should be soon :) )..

hippy
 
T

Terry Collins

Guest
Gemma Kernich wrote:
>
> "hippy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> >>

> > Yeah, upside-down, sitting on bars and saddle.
> >

> It's easier IMHO, to get the wheel out with the bike the right way up....


Right.
So how much can you lift with one arm?
Can you also change the tube/repair the puncture with one hand?
 
G

Gemma Kernich

Guest
"Terry Collins" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Gemma Kernich wrote:
> >
> > "hippy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> > news:[email protected]
> > >>
> > > Yeah, upside-down, sitting on bars and saddle.
> > >

> > It's easier IMHO, to get the wheel out with the bike the right way

up....
>
> Right.
> So how much can you lift with one arm?
> Can you also change the tube/repair the puncture with one hand?


Would you like a tube change race against me?

I said "to get the wheel out" it's easier to have it the right way up.
(getting the wheel back in is easier if it's the right way up too)
Then, if I need to change a tube (rather than just a wheel), I then place my
bike carefully on its side (chain side up) if there's nice lawn (so the
chain doesn't come off the front chainring). If there is no lawn (or if the
grass is wet), but a post or tree or fence instead I will tip the bike
forward to rest on the front wheel and two brake levers and lean the left
dropout against something. These two ways make it very unlikely for the
bike to tip over and bend/scratch things.

The 'bike turtle' upside-down option comes dead last for me. No advantage
to it whatsoever, can't see the point. I can't speak from MTB experience
though, road/track only.

Gemm
 
D

DaveB

Guest
Gemma Kernich wrote:
>
> The 'bike turtle' upside-down option comes dead last for me. No
> advantage to it whatsoever, can't see the point. I can't speak from
> MTB experience though, road/track only.
>
> Gemm
>
>

I definitely don't want to flip my MTB commuter because to do that I'd
have to remove the light, bell, and computer, unless anyone is brave
enough to balance the bike on top of them.

DaveB
 

PiledHigher

New Member
Jul 30, 2003
620
0
0
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DaveB said:
Gemma Kernich wrote:
>
> The 'bike turtle' upside-down option comes dead last for me. No
> advantage to it whatsoever, can't see the point. I can't speak from
> MTB experience though, road/track only.
>
> Gemm
>
>



I'm with Gemm right way up is easier to put in and out, for me nothing says noob like bike turtle.