Removing rear wheel help



A

Allan Hughs

Guest
Hi all, ok this might sound like a silly question, but I dread the thought
of removing a rear wheel if I get a punture on my Road Bike.

What tips do you have to remove and replace the rear wheel.

It seems to me when you remove it, the chain drops down.
I find it difficult to hold the bike and try to get the wheel back on.

Any tips, or is it just practice.
Sorry if this seems like a silly question, but I really struggle sometimes.
Thanks kindly,
Al
 
G

GPLama

Guest
DaveB wrote:
> Or you could talk to GPLama about how not to do it. ;)
>
> DaveB


Happy to offer my assistance.. :p


cheers,
GPL
'Handing out new tubes to 1/2 of the BR bunch at Kew tonight'
 
B

Ben Long

Guest
Al,

Just my thoughts but first thing, get yourself a quick release thingamy.
This makes the job dead easy. Regarding your chain, you'll find a little
hook on your seatstay where the chain sits nicely to allow you to get the
wheel on and off without any hassles. I sometimes find it easier to remove
the rear wheel with the front wheel off, using the front forks as a handy
platform to hold the bike steady. Plop the front wheel back on after the
back is fixed and you're away.

Happy riding,

Ben

"Allan Hughs" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Hi all, ok this might sound like a silly question, but I dread the thought
> of removing a rear wheel if I get a punture on my Road Bike.
>
> What tips do you have to remove and replace the rear wheel.
>
> It seems to me when you remove it, the chain drops down.
> I find it difficult to hold the bike and try to get the wheel back on.
>
> Any tips, or is it just practice.
> Sorry if this seems like a silly question, but I really struggle

sometimes.
> Thanks kindly,
> Al
>
>
 
D

DJ

Guest
"Ben Long" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Al,
>
> Just my thoughts but first thing, get yourself a quick release thingamy.
> This makes the job dead easy. Regarding your chain, you'll find a little
> hook on your seatstay where the chain sits nicely to allow you to get the
> wheel on and off without any hassles. I sometimes find it easier to
> remove
> the rear wheel with the front wheel off, using the front forks as a handy
> platform to hold the bike steady. Plop the front wheel back on after the
> back is fixed and you're away.
>
> Happy riding,
>
> Ben
>
> "Allan Hughs" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>> Hi all, ok this might sound like a silly question, but I dread the
>> thought
>> of removing a rear wheel if I get a punture on my Road Bike.
>>
>> What tips do you have to remove and replace the rear wheel.
>>
>> It seems to me when you remove it, the chain drops down.
>> I find it difficult to hold the bike and try to get the wheel back on.
>>
>> Any tips, or is it just practice.
>> Sorry if this seems like a silly question, but I really struggle

> sometimes.
>> Thanks kindly,
>> Al
>>
>>Don't forget to release the brakes first and more importantly, don't
>>forget to do up the brakes before riding.......

>
>
 
M

Michael Warner

Guest
On Wed, 23 Mar 2005 14:26:30 +1000, Allan Hughs wrote:

> Hi all, ok this might sound like a silly question, but I dread the thought
> of removing a rear wheel if I get a punture on my Road Bike.
>
> What tips do you have to remove and replace the rear wheel.


It's much easier if you shift to the small cog and (ideally) large
chainring beforehand.

--
bpo gallery at http://www4.tpgi.com.au/users/mvw1/bpo
 
R

Rob Partridge

Guest
"Ben Long" said:

> Just my thoughts but first thing, get yourself a quick release thingamy.
> This makes the job dead easy. Regarding your chain, you'll find a little
> hook on your seatstay where the chain sits nicely to allow you to get the
> wheel on and off without any hassles. I sometimes find it easier to

remove

Hahahahahahahahahaha...

You know, I've been riding for *sucks in breath through teeth* mumble years
and never realised what that was for! Don't I feel a fool. All the time I've
been struggling with the chain and holding it out of the way while
supporting the bike while getting there rear wheel in.

Rob (shaking his head and wondering what else I've been missing...)
 
B

bjay

Guest
"Allan Hughs" wrote

> Hi all, ok this might sound like a silly question, but I dread the thought
> of removing a rear wheel if I get a punture on my Road Bike.
>
> What tips do you have to remove and replace the rear wheel.
>
> It seems to me when you remove it, the chain drops down.
> I find it difficult to hold the bike and try to get the wheel back on.
>
> Any tips, or is it just practice.
> Sorry if this seems like a silly question, but I really struggle
> sometimes.
> Thanks kindly,


The two things I do that make it easier are;
1. Change down to one of the smaller cogs on the cassette. This makes it
much easier to get the cassette past the derailleur.
2. Turn the bike upside down. Then I don't have to worry about balancing
the bike, or dropping the chain and derailleur in the dirt. Just find it
much easier doing it this way.

Bjay
 
N

NoZX6R

Guest
bjay wrote:
> "Allan Hughs" wrote
>
>
>>Hi all, ok this might sound like a silly question, but I dread the thought
>>of removing a rear wheel if I get a punture on my Road Bike.
>>
>>What tips do you have to remove and replace the rear wheel.
>>
>>It seems to me when you remove it, the chain drops down.
>>I find it difficult to hold the bike and try to get the wheel back on.
>>
>>Any tips, or is it just practice.
>>Sorry if this seems like a silly question, but I really struggle
>>sometimes.
>>Thanks kindly,

>
>
> The two things I do that make it easier are;
> 1. Change down to one of the smaller cogs on the cassette. This makes it
> much easier to get the cassette past the derailleur.
> 2. Turn the bike upside down. Then I don't have to worry about balancing
> the bike, or dropping the chain and derailleur in the dirt. Just find it
> much easier doing it this way.
>
> Bjay
>
>


And change back into the lowest gear to put the wheel back on.

--
Nick
 
B

bjay

Guest
"NoZX6R" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> bjay wrote:
>> "Allan Hughs" wrote
>>
>>
>>>Hi all, ok this might sound like a silly question, but I dread the
>>>thought
>>>of removing a rear wheel if I get a punture on my Road Bike.
>>>
>>>What tips do you have to remove and replace the rear wheel.
>>>
>>>It seems to me when you remove it, the chain drops down.
>>>I find it difficult to hold the bike and try to get the wheel back on.
>>>
>>>Any tips, or is it just practice.
>>>Sorry if this seems like a silly question, but I really struggle
>>>sometimes.
>>>Thanks kindly,

>>
>>
>> The two things I do that make it easier are;
>> 1. Change down to one of the smaller cogs on the cassette. This makes it
>> much easier to get the cassette past the derailleur.
>> 2. Turn the bike upside down. Then I don't have to worry about balancing
>> the bike, or dropping the chain and derailleur in the dirt. Just find it
>> much easier doing it this way.
>>
>> Bjay

>
> And change back into the lowest gear to put the wheel back on.


No, I just leave it in the same position (small cog, highest gear), same
principle, makes it easy to get the cassette past the derailleur.

Bjay
 
A

Allan Hughs

Guest
What little hook on the seatstay ?
"DJ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "Ben Long" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> > Al,
> >
> > Just my thoughts but first thing, get yourself a quick release thingamy.
> > This makes the job dead easy. Regarding your chain, you'll find a

little
> > hook on your seatstay where the chain sits nicely to allow you to get

the
> > wheel on and off without any hassles. I sometimes find it easier to
> > remove
> > the rear wheel with the front wheel off, using the front forks as a

handy
> > platform to hold the bike steady. Plop the front wheel back on after

the
> > back is fixed and you're away.
> >
> > Happy riding,
> >
> > Ben
> >
> > "Allan Hughs" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> > news:[email protected]
> >> Hi all, ok this might sound like a silly question, but I dread the
> >> thought
> >> of removing a rear wheel if I get a punture on my Road Bike.
> >>
> >> What tips do you have to remove and replace the rear wheel.
> >>
> >> It seems to me when you remove it, the chain drops down.
> >> I find it difficult to hold the bike and try to get the wheel back on.
> >>
> >> Any tips, or is it just practice.
> >> Sorry if this seems like a silly question, but I really struggle

> > sometimes.
> >> Thanks kindly,
> >> Al
> >>
> >>Don't forget to release the brakes first and more importantly, don't
> >>forget to do up the brakes before riding.......

> >
> >

>
>
 
S

Skewer

Guest
http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gloss_h.html

A chain hanger is a small braze-on mounted on the inside of the right seat stay.
When the rear wheel is not installed in the frame, the chain may be routed over
this fitting to keep it from flopping around.
http://www.llewellynbikes.com/gallery/steelluggedframe/steellug10.htm

Allan Hughs wrote:
> What little hook on the seatstay ?
> "DJ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>
>>"Ben Long" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>>news:[email protected]
>>
>>>Al,
>>>
>>>Just my thoughts but first thing, get yourself a quick release thingamy.
>>>This makes the job dead easy. Regarding your chain, you'll find a

>
> little
>
>>>hook on your seatstay where the chain sits nicely to allow you to get

>
> the
>
>>>wheel on and off without any hassles. I sometimes find it easier to
>>>remove
>>>the rear wheel with the front wheel off, using the front forks as a

>
> handy
>
>>>platform to hold the bike steady. Plop the front wheel back on after

>
> the
>
>>>back is fixed and you're away.
>>>
>>>Happy riding,
>>>
>>>Ben
>>>
>>>"Allan Hughs" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>>>news:[email protected]
>>>
>>>>Hi all, ok this might sound like a silly question, but I dread the
>>>>thought
>>>>of removing a rear wheel if I get a punture on my Road Bike.
>>>>
>>>>What tips do you have to remove and replace the rear wheel.
>>>>
>>>>It seems to me when you remove it, the chain drops down.
>>>>I find it difficult to hold the bike and try to get the wheel back on.
>>>>
>>>>Any tips, or is it just practice.
>>>>Sorry if this seems like a silly question, but I really struggle
>>>
>>>sometimes.
>>>
>>>>Thanks kindly,
>>>>Al
>>>>
>>>>Don't forget to release the brakes first and more importantly, don't
>>>>forget to do up the brakes before riding.......
>>>
>>>

>>

>
>
 
P

Peter Signorini

Guest
"Skewer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gloss_h.html
>
> A chain hanger is a small braze-on mounted on the inside of the right seat

stay.

Yes, well that's handy. Problem is that Allan's bike may not have one of
these. It's actually pretty uncommon on anything other than a custom-built
frame. So realistic strategies to help him get the rear wheel out have to do
without this.

My tips:
1. Standing on the LH side of bike, flip QR open or undo axle nuts. Release
rear brake quick release.
2. Grasp seatpost/saddle with left hand, lift bike and use right hand to
slide wheel out.
3. Reach down and flick rear deraileur to clear cassette.
4. Hold bike up to slide wheel out of the way. Now lay the bike down on its
left side, checking to keep chain out of dirt, or better still hang frame up
on a suitable hook/tree branch, out of the way.
5. Sort out rear wheel repair.

Hope this helps.

Cheers
Peter
 
P

Peter Signorini

Guest
"Peter Signorini" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "Skewer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> > http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gloss_h.html
> >
> > A chain hanger is a small braze-on mounted on the inside of the right

seat
> stay.
>
> Yes, well that's handy. Problem is that Allan's bike may not have one of
> these. It's actually pretty uncommon on anything other than a custom-built
> frame. So realistic strategies to help him get the rear wheel out have to

do
> without this.
>
> My tips:
> 1. Standing on the LH side of bike, flip QR open or undo axle nuts.

Release
> rear brake quick release.
> 2. Grasp seatpost/saddle with left hand, lift bike and use right hand to
> slide wheel out.
> 3. Reach down and flick rear deraileur to clear cassette.
> 4. Hold bike up to slide wheel out of the way. Now lay the bike down on

its
> left side, checking to keep chain out of dirt, or better still hang frame

up
> on a suitable hook/tree branch, out of the way.
> 5. Sort out rear wheel repair.


PS. Forgot to mention - all this must be done with the chain on the smallest
cog on your cassette. And replacing the wheel is basically a matter of
reversing the process. Getting the chain onto the cassette is a matter of
lining them up as you hold the bike up above your wheel.

Cheers
Peter
 
B

Ben Long

Guest
"Peter Signorini" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]

> > A chain hanger is a small braze-on mounted on the inside of the right

seat
> stay.
>
> Yes, well that's handy. Problem is that Allan's bike may not have one of
> these. It's actually pretty uncommon on anything other than a custom-built
> frame. So realistic strategies to help him get the rear wheel out have to

do
> without this.


Actually, you'll find that this little attachment is as common as road grit.
I've never actually seen one like that in the link Skewer pointed to (which
looked as though it was on the chainstay rather than the seatstay) but
you'll often see a little knob tacked onto most seatstays, even cheap
frames. I have one on my machine which must be third hand 10 year old
K-mart job as I have never been able to work out the brand!

Ben