Removing rear wheel on my Road Bike



J

Jackie

Guest
Hello, I am new to cycling, and wanted to ask this group if they have any
tips on removing a rear wheel on a road bike.

I worry sick that if I get a punture far away from home, that I will have
trouble to fix it, mainly the removal and replacing of the rear wheel over
the tangled mess of the chain.

I have seen many riders put bikes on fences, or upside down, but which is
the most easy way to remove and replace the rear wheel.
I get all confused when I remove the wheel, and the chain drops down if you
know what I mean.
My LBS showed me, but they made it look so easy, but for me, I still dread
the day I have to do it alone.
So please which is the best way to approach this, upside down or which ??

Thanks so much, and sorry if this question sounds dumb.
Thanks again,
Jackie
 

alison_b

New Member
Feb 24, 2005
316
0
0
Jackie said:
Hello, I am new to cycling, and wanted to ask this group if they have any
tips on removing a rear wheel on a road bike.

I worry sick that if I get a punture far away from home, that I will have
trouble to fix it, mainly the removal and replacing of the rear wheel over
the tangled mess of the chain.

I have seen many riders put bikes on fences, or upside down, but which is
the most easy way to remove and replace the rear wheel.
I get all confused when I remove the wheel, and the chain drops down if you
know what I mean.
My LBS showed me, but they made it look so easy, but for me, I still dread
the day I have to do it alone.
So please which is the best way to approach this, upside down or which ??

Thanks so much, and sorry if this question sounds dumb.
Thanks again,
Jackie
Why wait 'til you get a puncture? Practice at home. Another bike nearby is handy to check, but basically it won't work unless it is right :D Really, unless you are in a race, what does it matter if it takes a few minutes?

cheers,
Ali
 
T

TimC

Guest
On 2005-10-16, Jackie (aka Bruce)
was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
> Hello, I am new to cycling, and wanted to ask this group if they have any
> tips on removing a rear wheel on a road bike.
>
> I worry sick that if I get a punture far away from home, that I will have
> trouble to fix it, mainly the removal and replacing of the rear wheel over
> the tangled mess of the chain.
>
> I have seen many riders put bikes on fences, or upside down, but which is
> the most easy way to remove and replace the rear wheel.
> I get all confused when I remove the wheel, and the chain drops down if you
> know what I mean.
> My LBS showed me, but they made it look so easy, but for me, I still dread
> the day I have to do it alone.
> So please which is the best way to approach this, upside down or which ??


By practicing :)

Practice early, practice often.

--
TimC
"This thesis brought to you by the letter tau" -- TimC
 

endroll

New Member
Jul 6, 2005
115
0
0
alison_b said:
Why wait 'til you get a puncture? Practice at home. Another bike nearby is handy to check, but basically it won't work unless it is right :D Really, unless you are in a race, what does it matter if it takes a few minutes?

cheers,
Ali
my thinking is that you should be able to remove and replace your rear wheel just by handling through the derailleur - almost no need to touch the chain. i just pull back and up which opens up the chain to the correct placement and just either pull the wheel up and to the side...or slip it in and make sure the chain engages on the cassette and it should slide straight in with a little push...
I second the practice bit - stick your bike up-side-down

:)
 
D

dave

Guest
Jackie wrote:
> Hello, I am new to cycling, and wanted to ask this group if they have any
> tips on removing a rear wheel on a road bike.
>
> I worry sick that if I get a punture far away from home, that I will have
> trouble to fix it, mainly the removal and replacing of the rear wheel over
> the tangled mess of the chain.
>
> I have seen many riders put bikes on fences, or upside down, but which is
> the most easy way to remove and replace the rear wheel.
> I get all confused when I remove the wheel, and the chain drops down if you
> know what I mean.
> My LBS showed me, but they made it look so easy, but for me, I still dread
> the day I have to do it alone.
> So please which is the best way to approach this, upside down or which ??
>
> Thanks so much, and sorry if this question sounds dumb.
> Thanks again,
> Jackie
>
>

Sheldon is the answer. But where are you? If you are in melb lots of
us will be happy to show you.. and maybe buy you a beer. Say at the goat.

And no guys I am just being nice here.

Dave
 
D

dave

Guest
TimC wrote:
> On 2005-10-16, Jackie (aka Bruce)
> was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
>
>>Hello, I am new to cycling, and wanted to ask this group if they have any
>>tips on removing a rear wheel on a road bike.
>>
>>I worry sick that if I get a punture far away from home, that I will have
>>trouble to fix it, mainly the removal and replacing of the rear wheel over
>>the tangled mess of the chain.
>>
>>I have seen many riders put bikes on fences, or upside down, but which is
>>the most easy way to remove and replace the rear wheel.
>>I get all confused when I remove the wheel, and the chain drops down if you
>>know what I mean.
>>My LBS showed me, but they made it look so easy, but for me, I still dread
>>the day I have to do it alone.
>>So please which is the best way to approach this, upside down or which ??

>
>
> By practicing :)
>
> Practice early, practice often.
>


Never had to practice Tim. The puncture gods and I talk often
 
R

Resound

Guest
"Jackie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Hello, I am new to cycling, and wanted to ask this group if they have any
> tips on removing a rear wheel on a road bike.
>
> I worry sick that if I get a punture far away from home, that I will have
> trouble to fix it, mainly the removal and replacing of the rear wheel over
> the tangled mess of the chain.
>
> I have seen many riders put bikes on fences, or upside down, but which is
> the most easy way to remove and replace the rear wheel.
> I get all confused when I remove the wheel, and the chain drops down if
> you know what I mean.
> My LBS showed me, but they made it look so easy, but for me, I still dread
> the day I have to do it alone.
> So please which is the best way to approach this, upside down or which ??
>
> Thanks so much, and sorry if this question sounds dumb.
> Thanks again,
> Jackie
>

It helps to shift up to the highest gear at the back (smallest cog) so that
when you put the wheel back in, you just need to straighten the derailleur
(grab the main parallelogram bit and rotate it down/clockwise), hook the
chain over the small cog, and slot the wheel into the dropouts. I usually do
most of this with the bike laying on its side, derailleur side up and then
once the wheel is more or less in place, stand the bike up and wiggle it a
bit so that the dropouts settle on the axle and then do up the quick
release. Only applies to vertical dropouts (pretty much any recent road bike
or MTB).
 

rooman

New Member
Mar 11, 2005
1,167
0
0
Resound said:
"Jackie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Hello, I am new to cycling, and wanted to ask this group if they have any
> tips on removing a rear wheel on a road bike.
>
> I worry sick that if I get a punture far away from home, that I will have
> trouble to fix it, mainly the removal and replacing of the rear wheel over
> the tangled mess of the chain.
>
> I have seen many riders put bikes on fences, or upside down, but which is
> the most easy way to remove and replace the rear wheel.
> I get all confused when I remove the wheel, and the chain drops down if
> you know what I mean.
> My LBS showed me, but they made it look so easy, but for me, I still dread
> the day I have to do it alone.
> So please which is the best way to approach this, upside down or which ??
>
> Thanks so much, and sorry if this question sounds dumb.
> Thanks again,
> Jackie
>

It helps to shift up to the highest gear at the back (smallest cog) so that
when you put the wheel back in, you just need to straighten the derailleur
(grab the main parallelogram bit and rotate it down/clockwise), hook the
chain over the small cog, and slot the wheel into the dropouts. I usually do
most of this with the bike laying on its side, derailleur side up and then
once the wheel is more or less in place, stand the bike up and wiggle it a
bit so that the dropouts settle on the axle and then do up the quick
release. Only applies to vertical dropouts (pretty much any recent road bike
or MTB).
make a practice of when you finish riding or need to change rear wheel, always, REPEAT ""ALWAYS"" move deraillers to smallest cogs, ie , to 39 or smaller on front and 11, 12, 13 etc on the rear...this de-stresses the dreailleur tension coils and aligns the derailleur for immediate wheel removal and replacement....

when you set the rear wheel back on the chain do it on the smallest rear sprocket and it will drop straight into the drop outs, no need to touch the derailleur...this is the smoothest technique, no mess, no greasy fingers, no moaning, no anger...just as the bike mechanics do it...just like the quick changes on the tour...OK....

remember, change front and rear derailleurs to their smallest sprocket and voila !!!!!