removing rear wheel?



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T

The Oracle

Guest
Hey, Please excuse my naiviety since I am fairly new to all this. I am happy enough changing the
front wheel. However, the rear wheel is a lot more involved - certainly on my bike at the minute. On
the latest road bikes, is it possible to get the rear off easily without having to mess about with
the rear gears/derailleurs? Is it just a question of whipping the chain off? I ask since I don't
have a road bike at the minute and am getting one soon.

On a similar vein, when BOTH wheels are off, is it possible to get a road bike into the boot
of a saloon car since I'm picking one up from London and don't have a bike rack for my motor
(Audi A4) yet?

When you clean the gears, do you completely srip the rear assembly and the front chainrings off and
soak them in diesel/petrol? Do you actually take the gears apart? I ask since I don't have any
biking friends to ask these questions yet.

Thanks guys, S
 
D

Drifter

Guest
The Oracle wrote:
>
> Hey, Please excuse my naiviety since I am fairly new to all this. I am happy enough changing the
> front wheel. However, the rear wheel is a lot more involved - certainly on my bike at the minute.
> On the latest road bikes, is it possible to get the rear off easily without having to mess about
> with the rear gears/derailleurs? Is it just a question of whipping the chain off? I ask since I
> don't have a road bike at the minute and am getting one soon.

Move the chain on to the smallest gears front and back and your rear wheel should slip off nicely
having lifted the chain off the rear sprocket.

>
> On a similar vein, when BOTH wheels are off, is it possible to get a road bike into the boot of
> a saloon car since I'm picking one up from London and don't have a bike rack for my motor (Audi
> A4) yet?

Being from another country, I don't know what a saloon car is but most boots/trunks can handle a
bike especially with one or both tires/tyres removed. A piece of light rope or bungy cord and a
piece of foam, cloth or cardboard is handy as a guard to prevent scratches to bike or vehicle/saloon
car trunk.

>
> When you clean the gears, do you completely srip the rear assembly and the front chainrings off
> and soak them in diesel/petrol? Do you actually take the gears apart? I ask since I don't have any
> biking friends to ask these questions yet.

If, as you say, you have limited experience with bikes and don't have any bike friends yet to ask
these questions, I would suggest you dismantle the bike as little as possible. May I suggest an old
toothbrush or similar type brush and petrol, if you like, to scrub the gears if warranted, until
such time as you have sufficient experience to disassembly your gears at will.

>
> Thanks guys, S
 
S

Sam Salt

Guest
I can only state the procedure that I usually perform.It makes life easier in the chain removal area
if you fit it with a Sram Powerlink ( about £1 from LBS ) a look on the Sram site will explain
things,then you can remove the chain easily at will.
http://www.sram.com/product/chain/chains/index.asp

Unhook brake wire, with the chain off slacken the quick release for the rear wheel and the wheel
should drop out,you may have to move the derrailleur out of the way a little.I don't remove the
cassette, give it a scrub with a washing up brush ( ask wife first ! ) with for example Muc Off
,dry ,and ferrett a rag between the sprockets to clean it.Park do a nifty little brush which is a
good idea. http://www.settlecycles.co.uk/shop/

Give the front chainwheels a good scrub with the Muc Off and the brush.Rinse soap off with a hose (
dont spray water fiercley on the bearings ).Depending on useage I sometimes remove rear skewer wipe
clean and regrease with copper based grease.When reassembling make sure to get the skewer springs
the right way round ( narrow end toward the bike ).Slide rear wheel back into dropouts and tighten
quick release securely.May need a bit of twiddling with to clear brake blocks,re attach brake wire
and replace chain .Of course there is the rest of the bike to clean then!!!

Other people will ,I have no doubt, their own way of doing things.

The Park site has some useful hints and tips regarding maintenance as has Sheldon Brown

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/index.html

and of course this newsgroup.My advice is don't bother about looking a prat,ask someone if you don't
know.I've dropped some right b******s and gone cap in hand to LBS to have it rectified.But as they
say,' he who never made a mistake never made anything '

Hope this helps,

Sam Salt ( Who still has to go to LBS for things he can't get the knack of )

PS No idea about the car,sorry

The Oracle wrote:
> Hey, Please excuse my naiviety since I am fairly new to all this. I am happy enough changing the
> front wheel. However, the rear wheel is a lot more involved - certainly on my bike at the minute.
> On the latest road bikes, is it possible to get the rear off easily without having to mess about
> with the rear gears/derailleurs? Is it just a question of whipping the chain off? I ask since I
> don't have a road bike at the minute and am getting one soon.
>
> On a similar vein, when BOTH wheels are off, is it possible to get a road bike into the boot of
> a saloon car since I'm picking one up from London and don't have a bike rack for my motor (Audi
> A4) yet?
>
> When you clean the gears, do you completely srip the rear assembly and the front chainrings off
> and soak them in diesel/petrol? Do you actually take the gears apart? I ask since I don't have any
> biking friends to ask these questions yet.
>
> Thanks guys, S

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P

Pete Biggs

Guest
The Oracle wrote:
> I am happy enough changing the front wheel. However, the rear wheel is a lot more involved -
> certainly on my bike at the minute. On the latest road bikes, is it possible to get the rear
> off easily without having to mess about with the rear gears/derailleurs? Is it just a question
> of whipping the chain off? I ask since I don't have a road bike at the minute and am getting
> one soon.

First, open brake quick release (on caliper for Shimano or Shimano clone, or on lever for Campag) to
get more tyre clearance.

Change gear to a small rear sprocket, open wheel quick release, push the derailleur back out of the
way with one hand (if necessary) and pull wheel out with the other. You do not have to take the
chain off!

> When you clean the gears, do you completely srip the rear assembly and the front chainrings off
> and soak them in diesel/petrol?

No need. Wiping with rag (dry or soaked with cleaner/solvent or with water/detergent if muddy) will
do fine. The rear cogs can be cleaned by inserting the edge of a rag between each cog.

> Do you actually take the gears apart?

I remove chainrings and cogs only very occasionally when a really thorough clean up is required, but
normally there's no need.

More cleaning is required in the winter months so don't worry too much about all this now. Just look
forward to riding the thing! :)

~PB
 
P

Philip Taylor -

Guest
Both my and my wife's bikes fit behind the driver's/passenger's seats (one pedal resting on rear
seats) with the front wheel only removed. This is in a Fiat Croma, a reasonably large five door
saloon (2.0 litre). Both in the sense of "one at a time", that is!

Philip Taylor
--------
The Oracle wrote:

[snip]

> On a similar vein, when BOTH wheels are off, is it possible to get a road bike into the boot of
> a saloon car since I'm picking one up from London and don't have a bike rack for my motor (Audi
> A4) yet?
 
M

Mr [email protected] \ -Lsqco

Guest
"drifter" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> The Oracle wrote:
> >
> dismantle the bike as little as possible. May I suggest an old toothbrush or similar type brush
> and petrol, if you like, to scrub the gears if warranted, until such time as you have sufficient
> experience to disassembly your gears at will.
>

I think I would *strongly* suggest using paraffin or diesel instead of petrol for this purpose.
Petrol vapour has a nasty habit of finding its way to unforseen sources of ignition. This is
obviously a very Bad Thing indeed.

Alex
 
T

Tim Woodall

Guest
On Thu, 3 Jul 2003 23:12:14 +0100, Mr [email protected] (2.3 zulu-alpha) [comms room 2]
<[email protected]> wrote:
> "drifter" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
>> The Oracle wrote:
>> >
>> dismantle the bike as little as possible. May I suggest an old toothbrush or similar type brush
>> and petrol, if you like, to scrub the gears if warranted, until such time as you have sufficient
>> experience to disassembly your gears at will.
>>
>
> I think I would *strongly* suggest using paraffin or diesel instead of petrol for this purpose.
> Petrol vapour has a nasty habit of finding its way to unforseen sources of ignition. This is
> obviously a very Bad Thing indeed.
>
Agreed. Petrol is sufficiently dangerous that there are actually very strict limits on how much
petrol you are allowed to store except in specially designed facilities and under licence. AIUI,
most cars would be illegal when filled up with petrol if there wasn't an exemption for storing
petrol in a car petrol tank.

Regards,

Tim.

--
God said, "div D = rho, div B = 0, curl E = - @B/@t, curl H = J + @D/@t," and there was light.

http://tjw.hn.org/ http://www.locofungus.btinternet.co.uk/
 
D

David Green

Guest
"The Oracle" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> Hey, Please excuse my naiviety since I am fairly new to all this. I am happy enough changing the
> front wheel. However, the rear wheel is a lot more involved - certainly on my bike at the minute.
> On the latest road bikes, is it possible to get the rear off easily without having to mess about
> with the rear gears/derailleurs?

Yes.

> Is it just a question of whipping the chain off?

No.

1. Slacken rear brake blocks (to ensure enough gap to get tyre through.)
2. Change gear to the highest gear (big front ring, smallest rear sprocket).
3. Release Quick-Release lever on rear hub.
4. Use one hand to pivot rear derailleur mechanism fully to the rear whilst you slip the rear
wheel out.

> On a similar vein, when BOTH wheels are off, is it possible to get a road bike into the boot of
> a saloon car since I'm picking one up from London and don't have a bike rack for my motor (Audi
> A4) yet?

Yes. A good tip is to use a short bungee (elastic with hooks at the ends) around slack chain and the
frame to stop messy chain dragging all over your motor.

> When you clean the gears, do you completely srip the rear assembly and the front chainrings off
> and soak them in diesel/petrol?Do you actually take the gears apart? I ask since I don't have any
> biking friends to ask these questions yet.

No. Paraffin works as well, but is less explosive than petrol and less unpleasant than petrol
and diesel if you splash some on your hands. An old toothbrush used to degrease the rear mech
and the front chainrings in situ is ideal. I suggest learning how to remove your chain yourself
(for thorough cleaning and lubrication). Then, give the mech and 'rings a quick external clean
at that time.

I only remove front rings for major rebuilds. I only strip the rear mech once a year in
annual service.

David Green Cambridge.
 
J

Just Zis Guy

Guest
On Fri, 4 Jul 2003 09:23:22 +0000 (UTC), Tim Woodall <[email protected]> wrote:

>most cars would be illegal when filled up with petrol if there wasn't an exemption for storing
>petrol in a car petrol tank.

An excellent reason for removing that ill-judged exemption ;-)

Guy
===
** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com Advance
notice: ADSL service in process of transfer to a new ISP. Obviously there will be a week of downtime
between the engineer removing the BT service and the same engineer connecting the same equipment on
the same line in the same exchange and billing it to the new ISP.
 
I

Ian Smith

Guest
On Fri, 4 Jul, Tim Woodall <[email protected]> wrote:

> Agreed. Petrol is sufficiently dangerous that there are actually very strict limits on how much
> petrol you are allowed to store except in specially designed facilities and under licence.

Actually, you can store quite a lot, as long as you do it in little bottles and don't keep them all
in the same place. I think you can even use milk bottles if you like, as long as they are securely
stoppered (but you can't use a glass bottle any bigger than a pint). Plus, the regulations are
changing - DSEAR already applies to workplaces, and something similar is going to apply to
residential premises in due course. The gist of the new regulations is to remove the proscriptive
requirements (like container style, max volume, allowed location and so on) and replace them with a
requirement that you don't do anything dangerous.

This is much better for buck-passing because the powers that be can retrospectively assert that
whatever cause the explosion must have been dangerous otherwise it wouldn't have happened. Of
course, no-one official will tell you whether any particular proposal is dangerous or not in advance
of an explosion.

regards, Ian SMith
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D

Dave Larrington

Guest
Ian Smith wrote:

> Actually, you can store quite a lot, as long as you do it in little bottles and don't keep them
> all in the same place. I think you can even use milk bottles if you like, as long as they are
> securely stoppered (but you can't use a glass bottle any bigger than a pint).

Careful, Ian. That would, according to the Ed Dolan School Of International Relations, constitute
Weapons of Mass Destruction and would thereby legitimise a US first strike on your shed. Terrorist!

;-)

Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
===========================================================
Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
===========================================================
 
T

Tim Woodall

Guest
On Sat, 5 Jul 2003 11:51:50 +0000 (UTC), Ian Smith <[email protected]> wrote:
> On Fri, 4 Jul, Tim Woodall <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>> Agreed. Petrol is sufficiently dangerous that there are actually very strict limits on how much
>> petrol you are allowed to store except in specially designed facilities and under licence.
>
> Actually, you can store quite a lot, as long as you do it in little bottles and don't keep them
> all in the same place. I think you can even use milk bottles if you like, as long as they are
> securely stoppered (but you can't use a glass bottle any bigger than a pint). Plus, the
> regulations are changing - DSEAR already applies to workplaces, and something similar is going to
> apply to residential premises in due course. The gist of the new regulations is to remove the
> proscriptive requirements (like container style, max volume, allowed location and so on) and
> replace them with a requirement that you don't do anything dangerous.
>
You may be right about the regulations changing but:

The Petroleum Spirit (Motor Vehicles etc) Regulations 1929 allow storage of up to two 10 litre metal
petrol containers in a garage or other structure which is separated from living accomodation by a
fire-resisting barrier.

The Petroleum Spirit (Plastic Containers) Regulations 1982 allow up to two 5 litre plastic petrol
containers in a garage ... (as above)

The maximum penalty in a magistrates court is 5000GBP per offence. The magistrates can also refer
the case to the Crown court where the penalties are unlimited.

The 1929 law was added to by the Road Traffic (Petroleum Spirit) Regulations 1933 which (I think)
enables storage of petrol for the use by petrol propelled vehicles only but if you use it to clean
your chain then these regulations presumably wouldn't apply.

The 1933 regulations also limit the maximum amount of petrol that can be stored, including that in
petrol tanks, to 60 gallons in any one storage place. (How big to car tanks get - could two full
cars in a double garage exceed this?) (This might include next doors car - I'm not sure what "in the
same occupation" means w.r.t. separation by 20 feet)

OTOH, www.surreycc.gov.uk (I can't be bothered to include the full url) has ... 4 Licences:

[Not requiring a licence] Not exceeding 15 litres of petroleum ... may be kept for sale or for
private use in glass, earthenware or metal vessels ... and each containing not more than 570ml.

Spirit (Plastic containers) Regulations 1982... In no case may more than 275 litres be so kept in
any one storage place.

(275 litres sounds like 60 gallons to me :)

Regards,

Tim.

--
God said, "div D = rho, div B = 0, curl E = - @B/@t, curl H = J + @D/@t," and there was light.

http://tjw.hn.org/ http://www.locofungus.btinternet.co.uk/
 
I

Ian Smith

Guest
On Mon, 7 Jul 2003, Tim Woodall <[email protected]> wrote:
> On Sat, 5 Jul 2003 11:51:50 +0000 (UTC), Ian Smith <[email protected]> wrote:
> > On Fri, 4 Jul, Tim Woodall <[email protected]> wrote:
> >
> >> Agreed. Petrol is sufficiently dangerous that there are actually very strict limits on how
> >> much petrol you are allowed to store except in specially designed facilities and under
> >> licence.
> >
> > Actually, you can store quite a lot, as long as you do it in little bottles and don't keep them
> > all in the same place. I think you can even use milk bottles if you like, as long as they are
> > securely stoppered (but you can't use a glass bottle any bigger than a pint). Plus, the
> > regulations are changing - DSEAR already applies to workplaces, and something similar is going
> > to apply to residential premises in due course. The gist of the new regulations is to remove the
> > proscriptive requirements (like container style, max volume, allowed location and so on) and
> > replace them with a requirement that you don't do anything dangerous.
> >
> You may be right about the regulations changing but:
>
> The Petroleum Spirit (Motor Vehicles etc) Regulations 1929 allow storage of up to two 10 litre
> metal petrol containers in a garage or other structure which is separated from living
> accomodation by a fire-resisting barrier.

Exactly - so I can keep two in the garage, two in the potting cupboard outside the kitchen door, and
two in the shed plus the two I'm allowed in the car - 80 litres. I count that as "quite a lot".

Besides, if I wanted more, I just need to assemble separate structues in the garden - note that the
structures need not be fireproof, nor separated from each other by a fireproof barrier, so rows of
rabbit-hutches would meet these regulations.

My neighbour, who has a garage, three sheds, a tortoise hut and four cars on the drive could store
180 litres plus whatever's in the fuel tanks.

> [Not requiring a licence] Not exceeding 15 litres of petroleum ... may be kept for sale or for
> private use in glass, earthenware or metal vessels ... and each containing not more than 570ml.

That's what I said - you can use milkbottles if you put a stopper in them.

regards, Ian SMith
--
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T

Tim Woodall

Guest
On Mon, 7 Jul 2003 18:56:42 +0000 (UTC), Ian Smith <[email protected]> wrote: The structures
have to be separated by 20m otherwise they count as one structure for storage.

> My neighbour, who has a garage, three sheds, a tortoise hut and four cars on the drive could store
> 180 litres plus whatever's in the fuel tanks.
>
>> [Not requiring a licence] Not exceeding 15 litres of petroleum ... may be kept for sale or for
>> private use in glass, earthenware or metal vessels ... and each containing not more than 570ml.
>
> That's what I said - you can use milkbottles if you put a stopper in them.

But a total of 15l. Anthing else has to be stored for the use in mechanically propelled vehicles.

AIUI, these regulations cause most problems for aircraft owners.

Regards,

Tim.

--
God said, "div D = rho, div B = 0, curl E = - @B/@t, curl H = J + @D/@t," and there was light.

http://tjw.hn.org/ http://www.locofungus.btinternet.co.uk/
 
D

Dave Larrington

Guest
Tim Woodall wrote:

> The 1933 regulations also limit the maximum amount of petrol that can be stored, including that in
> petrol tanks, to 60 gallons in any one storage place. (How big to car tanks get - could two full
> cars in a double garage exceed this?)

A swift Google reveals few cars with tanks bigger than 100 litres - you'd probably need one ordinary
family hatchback and a brace of Bentleys to get up to 60 gallons.

Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
===========================================================
Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
===========================================================
 
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