Repainting Aluminum Frame

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by fascistpig, May 18, 2004.

  1. fascistpig

    fascistpig New Member

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    Thinking about repainting my aluminum (Double Butted 6061 T6)frame. Have some questions maybe someone can help me sort out.

    1. Should I remove the paint or just paint over existing paint?

    2. If I decide to remove the original paint first, how should I do it without damaging frame? Can I use chemical solvents or should I should sand paper it off?

    3. Should I have a professional do it? How much does that cost?
     
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  2. Rocket69

    Rocket69 New Member

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    The best solution is to "strip" it. The easiest way is to "dip" it into an "acid bath". 4 to 5 minutes later, the paint will peel right off. Just hose it down with water and wipe it dry.

    Now, the bike is ready to be "primed" and once that is dry, you can go ahead and paint it. If possible, "bake" the bike 2 - 3 hours in a heat over and then spray a clear coating to protect the paint. Again, "bake" the bike 2 - 3 hours after clear and then let it sit at room temperature. Ideally, don't touch the bike for a few days as this will allow the clear to dry completely. Once that is done, you can "buff" the bike with an industrial type wax (3M). Now, you are set to go.

    Sounds complicated? YEP, if you don't have all the necessary equipment.

    Rocket69
     
  3. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    You can paint over existing paint if it's sound and you smooth out any chips and other blemishes. There are preps that make the old paint surface suitable for new paint. There are commerial strippers. A pro job is probably $150 and up. A rattle can is alot cheaper, and can look ok if you know what you are dong and like pucky,with flies in it if you don't.
     
  4. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    And you do all this in your bathtub and oven?
     
  5. dennis dee

    dennis dee New Member

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    Don't mind him Rocket 69. boudreaux gets his rocks off by putting retorts like that. His favorite expression - "THAT'S A LOT OF HOOEY!" He's really funny that's why he's the official clown in this forum.
     
  6. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    I would suggest you try something original,but regurgitating seems to suit you.
     
  7. fascistpig

    fascistpig New Member

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    Wouldn't the acid eat the aluminum?
     
  8. dhk

    dhk New Member

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    The point is you don't need all the "rocket science" to paint a frame at home with spray lacquer. Baked enamel may be great for MAACO, but 4-5 coats of lacquer is a lot easier. It tacks-up quickly, so it can be recoated in about 30 minutes as you build the coats. Dust may produce some small imperfections, but really not a big deal if you're just respraying an old frame.

    Give it a few days to harden, and you can rub or buff out the lacquer for a great shine.
     
  9. dennis dee

    dennis dee New Member

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    Whateber hooey boy! Keep trying.:eek:
     
  10. holysmokebatman

    holysmokebatman New Member

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    How 'bout some basic prep tips for touching up bad spots. For instance, bare spots/chips on a steel frame. A little sanding, emery cloth? Thanks! Damage control vs. disaster reccovery.
     
  11. dhk

    dhk New Member

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    I've touched up a few chips on steel and Al frames using the auto touch-up paint that comes in small brush-top jars. Model paints from the hobby shop work also.

    For a small chip, suggest you don't sand anything, since that will just expand the problem. I just clean the chipped spot with a little mineral spirits, dry, and dab on several thin coats to fill in the spot. I never get a perfect color match, but the repairs seems to hold up fine.

    I've never had much luck stopping rust for more than a few months. If you've got surface rust, only thing I know to do is to sand it down to bare metal and prime before repainting. Sand-blasting or acid-dipping may work great, but that's expensive. And, if the rust is more than superficial on a super-thinwall steel tubing, not sure if I'd want to remove any metal.
     
  12. Bigbananabike

    Bigbananabike Member

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    It can. DO NOT acid dip an alloy frame!
     
  13. cyclintom

    cyclintom Well-Known Member

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    Usually you can have a professional powder coating place strip it and powder coat it with a large varieties of colors for around $100. The more fancy the colors usually the more expensive they are just for the powder.

    Professional bike painters using things like Imron can charge up to $1,200 or more for a "factory quality" paint job but I don't know many factories that have that good a paint job including the addition of the decals and the clear coat to protect them.
     
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