repair bike or replace?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Zerling, Jun 1, 2003.

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  1. Zerling

    Zerling Guest

    When do people replace their bikes?

    I bought my (cheapish, about £200) Dawes hybrid, 6 years ago. I've done about 6000 miles on it,
    and it's OK for commuting about 8 miles daily except that the chainwheel/freewheel/chain now
    needs replacing. For reliability, without spending too much, should I spend some money on getting
    a new bike; go for secondhand; or start replacing components (I've already had to replace the
    bottom bracket).

    zerling
     
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  2. Not Me

    Not Me Guest

    zerling deftly scribbled:

    > When do people replace their bikes?
    >
    > I bought my (cheapish, about £200) Dawes hybrid, 6 years ago. I've done about 6000 miles on it,
    > and it's OK for commuting about 8 miles daily except that the chainwheel/freewheel/chain now
    > needs replacing. For reliability, without spending too much, should I spend some money on getting
    > a new bike; go for secondhand; or start replacing components (I've already had to replace the
    > bottom bracket).
    >
    > zerling

    Depending on how good the frame is and how much you like the ride it gives, just replace componentry
    as it fails .. preferably *just* before it fails .. ;)

    My bike, a Dyna-Tech (Raleigh) CroMo comp mountain bike has been great since I got it, around 10 or
    more years ago .. The only original part nowadays is the frame .. everything else has been changed
    or upgraded as it's broken / worn out / been stolen .. ;)

    --
    Digweed
     
  3. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    zerling wrote:
    > When do people replace their bikes?

    I don't seem to do that anymore - just replace components instead. There's just frame, forks and
    rear brake left from my 1985 Raleigh Royal and nothing whatsoever left from my 1999 Dawes Giro 500
    on my road bike....well, no, actually some of it is actually now on the Raleigh!

    > I bought my (cheapish, about £200) Dawes hybrid, 6 years ago. I've done about 6000 miles on it,
    > and it's OK for commuting about 8 miles daily except that the chainwheel/freewheel/chain now
    > needs replacing. For reliability, without spending too much, should I spend some money on getting
    > a new bike; go for secondhand; or start replacing components (I've already had to replace the
    > bottom bracket).

    If that's all that's wrong, it's worth getting new components, IMO - unless you fancy a much
    different/better bike anyway.

    ~PB
     
  4. Jim Price

    Jim Price Guest

    zerling wrote:
    > When do people replace their bikes?

    I like to get a good ten years out of a bike. However, some of mine resemble the philosophers hammer
    - 3 new handles and five new heads. Bizarrely, and not uniquely, this stops me buying really
    expensive bikes, as the expensive ones seem to be engineered for minimum weight rather than maximum
    longevity.

    > I bought my (cheapish, about £200) Dawes hybrid, 6 years ago. I've done about 6000 miles on it,
    > and it's OK for commuting about 8 miles daily except that the chainwheel/freewheel/chain now
    > needs replacing. For reliability, without spending too much, should I spend some money on getting
    > a new bike; go for secondhand; or start replacing components (I've already had to replace the
    > bottom bracket).

    I'd be a bit surprised if the chainwheel needed replacing if this is the first time you are
    replacing a chain. You don't say how many gears you have, but if its e.g. 7 speed, then it should be
    possible to replace the freewheel and chain for around £25 if you shop around on the web. Thats if
    you do the work yourself. It would be worth measuring the chain to see how stretched it is
    (instructions at the usual www.sheldonbrown.com), as if it is not too worn, you may not even need to
    replace the freewheel. However, that sounds optimistic about its condition given that you seem to
    have decided that all of it needs replacing anyway. If you get a local bike shop to do it, it will
    most likely cost more, but how much would it need to cost you before you decide you would rather
    have a new bike?

    Jim Price
     
  5. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Sun, 1 Jun 2003 17:23:03 +0100, "zerling" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >When do people replace their bikes?

    When their wives don't need a new car ;-)

    You can replace components indefinitely on most bikes. We had a "least original bike" thread
    recently and my Claud Butler, whose frame, headset and forks are the only original components, was
    considered to be almost as supplied by comparison with some :)

    Dawes bikes are usually well built, so the frame could easly last a lifetime. 6000 does sound a bit
    soon for a chainring to go, but if the bike is used and the chain is just oiled with ordinary oil
    and not cleaned regularly it's not outrageous. How badly worn is the chain? Smetimes a worn chain
    makes the rings and sprockets feel as if they are worn even if they aren't. Bike shops are not
    always scrupulously honest in diagnosing the extent of replacement necessary, either...

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
    dynamic DNS permitting)
    NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
    work. Apologies.
     
  6. M Series

    M Series Guest

    I have never replaced a bike, I have bought new ones, keeping the old ones and upgraded the old
    ones. They all get used except maybe the tourer though I intend to do my E2E next year on it. That
    bike was bought in 1987 and has the original frame, seat pin, bars, stem, chainset, chain rings,
    brake levers and brakes. All other components were upgraded either because they broke or because I
    felt they would not be up to 6 months loaded touring.

    The second bike I bought was in 1989 and has the original frame, rear mech., brakes (though
    these will be replaced once I get new cables), bars, brake levers, gear levers, hubs. This bike
    is a racer.

    My newest bike was put together in 1998, it too is a racer but both racers get used, I used them
    both today in fact. I got a new one as I wanted a higher specced and lighter bike than the #2 bike.
    Maybe that's your answer. I haven't sold any of these bikes because I don't think they'd fetch much
    and to be honest having spent so much time on board them I don't really want to part with them.

    I did sell my mountain bike because I gave up mountain biking when I parted from the bike too
    quickly in the Coed-y-Brenin - that's a different story.

    "zerling" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > When do people replace their bikes?
    >
    > I bought my (cheapish, about £200) Dawes hybrid, 6 years ago. I've done about 6000 miles on it,
    > and it's OK for commuting about 8 miles daily
    except
    > that the chainwheel/freewheel/chain now needs replacing. For reliability, without spending too
    > much, should I spend some money on getting a new
    bike;
    > go for secondhand; or start replacing components (I've already had to replace the bottom bracket).
    >
    > zerling
     
  7. Burton Figg

    Burton Figg Guest

    I had a similar experience. I had a trusted old Raleigh Criterium that I'd done thousands of miles
    on over the years. Then the bottom bracket went. The bikeshopman said, ah! The chainset is stuck
    fast, we cannot remove it. At the same time I also needed a new headset, freewheel, back wheel.
    Bikeshopman said, it's not worth it, find another bike.

    Alas I listened to him. It took about 6 months of farting around with other second hand bikes until
    I got hold of a Raleigh Record Sprint 2nd hand bike, which is very similar to the old Raleigh. With
    hindsight I should've taken the Raleigh to a workshop and had the bottom bracket axel cut through
    rather than get rid of the bike.

    If you like the Dawes, and it's a comfy fit, stick with it and replace the parts. In my opinion!

    Burton
     
  8. Zerling

    Zerling Guest

    "zerling" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > When do people replace their bikes?
    >
    > I bought my (cheapish, about £200) Dawes hybrid, 6 years ago. I've done about 6000 miles on it,
    > and it's OK for commuting about 8 miles daily
    except
    > that the chainwheel/freewheel/chain now needs replacing. For reliability, without spending too
    > much, should I spend some money on getting a new
    bike;
    > go for secondhand; or start replacing components (I've already had to replace the bottom bracket).
    >
    > zerling
    >
    Thanks for replies, the consensus seems to be to repair the bike for as long as the frame
    holds together!

    zerling
     
  9. Irish Chris

    Irish Chris New Member

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    Hi Zerling,

    I'm just writing to concur with everyone else's opinion and suggest you keep replacing parts until it just isn't worth it any more.

    As far as I can tell a number of people spend a lot more money than they have to on their bikes and discard perfectly good ones merely for the sake of getting something new and/or more aesthetically pleasing to them.

    Obviously you should go ahead and change to another bike if it would make you happier but, no matter what you choose to do, you would probably be best off hanging on to the bike you currently have and keeping it roadworthy too.

    Sorry I can't be more help. I hope you get many many more miles of cycling enjoyment from your bike.
     
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