Repair Stand?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Ron Hardin, May 6, 2003.

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  1. Ron Hardin

    Ron Hardin Guest

    What's a good repair stand, if I were to spring for one?

    I'm tired of dumping out all the nicely tamped down contents of my luggage milk crate to work on the
    bike. It takes weeks for things to tamp back down to a nice level mulch again.
    --
    Ron Hardin [email protected]

    On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
     
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  2. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...

    >What's a good repair stand, if I were to spring for one? I'm tired of dumping out all the nicely
    >tamped down contents of my luggage milk crate to work on the bike. It takes weeks for things to
    >tamp back down to a nice level mulch again.

    I have an ultimate that works well for me. I got a package deal on the stand, truing attachment,
    handlbar holder, tool box, and soft case.
    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  3. Stu

    Stu Guest

    If you have more time than you know what to do with, you could do what l
    did. just cut the rear triangle off a 20 inch bike with pedal back brakes(think you call them
    coaster brakes). Cut the spokes off the rear wheel, weld some sq tube to the hub, spring load
    the chain to hold the brake on. Then work out a way to mount the bike. l used a couple if
    pieces of angle iron, two hinges, a $12 locking clamp and lined it with an old inner-tube. The
    two main reasons for this are
    1. My gear a brake cables run down the top tube and l didn't see the point in have the bike on a
    stand that l couldn't change gears or use the rear brakes. so my stand mounts to the seat tube
    2. The park PCS-1 stand in australia costs $449AUS(that's $287US), jensonusa sells them for
    $139.95US. $449AUS is more than l paid for my bike lol oh and 3. l like stuffing about with
    this sort of thing it works great, l can stop the bike at any angle with the brake and at the
    cost of $12
     
  4. Kbh

    Kbh Guest

    Ultimate consumer stand has done me well, can be a bit tippy if the bike's in the wrong orientation.
    But I do like it.

    "Ron Hardin" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > What's a good repair stand, if I were to spring for one?
    >
    > I'm tired of dumping out all the nicely tamped down contents of my luggage milk crate to work on
    > the bike. It takes weeks for things to tamp back down to a nice level mulch again.
    > --
    > Ron Hardin [email protected]
    >
    > On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
     
  5. I have a Park stand that is OK. These things are not particularly cheap, but well worth it for ease
    of use. I figure I saved enough on my first overhaul to pay for it.

    Ron Hardin <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > What's a good repair stand, if I were to spring for one?
    >
    > I'm tired of dumping out all the nicely tamped down contents of my luggage milk crate to work on
    > the bike. It takes weeks for things to tamp back down to a nice level mulch again.
     
  6. Me

    Me Guest

    Hi, I'm in the UK too and have tried quite a few stands in my time. When I worked in a bike shop I
    only worked with Park Pro stands which is what I've always aimed for since. You cant beat their nice
    clamp and the cast iron base is solid even with 40+ lbs bikes on em. Only problem is they are £250+

    OK, so after using the park portable home stands in the past, I've finally found what I think is a
    good quality stand at a decent price.

    For £107 from Wiggle you can get the Minoura RS4000 workstand.

    Its a beefy but light aluminium stand that has extra long legs that are nice and stable. and unlike
    the parks at the price it folds up very small. When you take it out of your car or shed to set it up
    people probably will think you are a photographer as it looks a lot like a videocam tripod.

    The clamp is nice and sturdy. Just sturdy enough to allow me to attach my mtb by the seatpost.
    Usually, you gotta attach a bike to a protable stand by their top tube as other wise it gets tippy
    but this is quite good, even better with lighterweight road bikes.

    All in all a good deal I'd say, but I've always been picky about my spanners and such.

    If its in your budget, get it, otherwise save up and wait, you wont regret
    it...

    cheers

    "Ron Hardin" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > What's a good repair stand, if I were to spring for one?
    >
    > I'm tired of dumping out all the nicely tamped down contents of my luggage milk crate to work on
    > the bike. It takes weeks for things to tamp back down to a nice level mulch again.
    > --
    > Ron Hardin [email protected]
    >
    > On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
     
  7. Hi Ron,

    Here is what I suggest:

    take a four foot 2x2 and saw it into four 12 inch pieces. Nail them together in a square with ends
    overlapping, so that two of the pieces are always off the ground.

    You're done. Now throw it on the shop floor. It always lands right side up. Turn your bicycle upside
    down, put the bars on the sides of the square which are raised. Obviously this keeps shifters,
    hoods, computers, etc off the floor.

    When you're done, you kick it, and it goes skating away under the bench. When you want it back, just
    find it with your toe. Easy to bring in the car with you. Total cost: $1.

    I tried the park stand but went back to my wooden square.

    Doug

    Ron Hardin <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > What's a good repair stand, if I were to spring for one?
    >
    > I'm tired of dumping out all the nicely tamped down contents of my luggage milk crate to work on
    > the bike. It takes weeks for things to tamp back down to a nice level mulch again.
     
  8. Bob Parkins

    Bob Parkins Guest

    I use the Blackburn stand... it is ok... does the job no problem. If I were to do it again I
    would get the Park consumer model. It is more compact, height is adjustable (i think), and clamp
    is way better. It is a little more $ but I think after a little bit of time that little bit of $
    will be worth it.
     
  9. Ron Hardin <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > What's a good repair stand, if I were to spring for one?
    >
    > I'm tired of dumping out all the nicely tamped down contents of my luggage milk crate to work on
    > the bike. It takes weeks for things to tamp back down to a nice level mulch again.
    In more than 20 years of working on all kinds of bikes I've only used a hook screwed into the
    overhead beam of the garage. Even work on the tandem this way although it barely fits from beam
    hook to floor. Things swing a bit of course but there's no stand to take up room and a hook
    costs a dollar.
     
  10. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >Ron Hardin <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    >> What's a good repair stand, if I were to spring for one?
    >>
    >> I'm tired of dumping out all the nicely tamped down contents of my luggage milk crate to work on
    >> the bike. It takes weeks for things to tamp back down to a nice level mulch again.
    >In more than 20 years of working on all kinds of bikes I've only used a hook screwed into the
    >overhead beam of the garage. Even work on the tandem this way although it barely fits from beam
    >hook to floor. Things swing a bit of course but there's no stand to take up room and a hook costs
    >a dollar.

    The hook costs a dollar, but how much does the house that holds the hook cost? :)
    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
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