Repairing rips in tires?

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Mikael Seierup, May 30, 2003.

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  1. Took a direct hit from a piece of glass in my front S-Licks the other day. Left a nice 10 mm long
    rip in the tire. Was just wondering if theres any way to glue it and keep the tire a bit longer? I
    already put a nice thick tireboot of rubber in, but I think that rip is going to grow and the tire
    is fairly new.

    M.
     
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  2. Mikael Seierup wrote:

    > Was just wondering if theres any way to glue it and keep the tire a bit longer? I already put
    > a nice thick tireboot of rubber in, but I think that rip is going to grow and the tire is
    > fairly new.

    Commiserations. I had a similar thing happen to a three-week old Stelvio recently. I tried
    superglue, but it seemed to be reluctant to hold for very long, and eventually I had to resort to a
    new tyre following a Several of vists from the P*nct*r* Fairy. Fortunately, the last one occurred
    only two minutes walk from Bikefix.

    I have since tried gluing it again and leaving it to set for agesandagesandages, but I don't have
    much confidence that it'll stay stuck for long at 120 psi.

    Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  3. Tom Blum

    Tom Blum Guest

    Mikael,

    I just scrapped a 520x25 with a stone cut. I decided to pitch it, even though a boot might work.

    The cut was teensy and held at 80 psi after a road side repair. Later, when I pumped it to 100 psi,
    I got 1/4 mile down the road, when "BANG": the tube bubblegumed through the hole and blew.

    With my luck where the P,,ct,,re Fairy is concerned, a sacrifice is necessary, to get back on the
    good side.

    You may be luckier than I

    --
    Miles of Smiles,

    Tom Blum Winter Haven, Florida Homebuilts: SWB Tour Easy Clone Speed Machine Clone High Racer Clone
    (coming soon) www.gate.net/~teblum
     
  4. Cletus Lee

    Cletus Lee Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Took a direct hit from a piece of glass in my front S-Licks the other day. Left a nice 10 mm long
    > rip in the tire. Was just wondering if theres any way to glue it and keep the tire a bit longer? I
    > already put a nice thick tireboot of rubber in, but I think that rip is going to grow and the tire
    > is fairly new.

    I don't think there is anything that will make the tire usable for anything more than a spare. Deep
    cuts longer than 5-7mm that penetrate the the belt are enough for me to DX the tire. I have had some
    success with a product (available in this country) that runners use to extend the life of running
    shoes. The brand name is "Shoe Goo" It is a pliable resineous kind of glue that can build up worn
    soles on running shoes. I found that injecting this 'Goo' into the cut and spreading it out on the
    inside and outside of the cut to form an "I" shape plug will give the tire a little longer life.
    --

    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  5. Larry Varney

    Larry Varney Guest

    Tom Blum wrote:
    > Mikael,
    >
    > I just scrapped a 520x25 with a stone cut. I decided to pitch it, even though a boot might work.
    >
    > The cut was teensy and held at 80 psi after a road side repair. Later, when I pumped it to 100
    > psi, I got 1/4 mile down the road, when "BANG": the tube bubblegumed through the hole and blew.
    >
    > With my luck where the P,,ct,,re Fairy is concerned, a sacrifice is necessary, to get back on the
    > good side.
    >
    > You may be luckier than I
    >
    >
    > -- Miles of Smiles,
    >
    > Tom Blum Winter Haven, Florida Homebuilts: SWB Tour Easy Clone Speed Machine Clone High Racer
    > Clone (coming soon) www.gate.net/~teblum
    >
    >
    >
    I discovered a cut on the sidewall on the rear tire on my Greenspeed just the other day. It's
    close to a half-inch long, and it was puckered outward pretty badly - it's one of those
    all-the-way-through cuts. I was hoping that this string of posts would suggest an easy,
    fool-proof way of saving the tire, but it doesn't seem like it.

    --
    Larry Varney Cold Spring, KY http://home.fuse.net/larryvarney
     
  6. "Dave Larrington" skrev

    > Commiserations. I had a similar thing happen to a three-week old Stelvio recently. I tried
    > superglue, but it seemed to be reluctant to hold for very long, and eventually I had to resort to
    > a new tyre following a Several of vists from the P*nct*r* Fairy.

    Does "superglue" glue anything but fingers? It didn't work for the tire for me either. I have in
    fact never gotten mine to glue anything for very long so usually I just reach for the epoxy.

    The cut is in the thread and the bit of 3 mm thick rubber some nice polish gentleman donated for
    another gammy tire last year seems to do the trick so far. And my LBS still has a few spares so I
    can pop down and get one if it rips totally apart.

    In related news my bottom chaintube just packed it in so I got a chance to ride with the returnside
    of the chain along the wheel and didn't like it. :) Damn thing hit the spokes on occasion so I rode
    the last 8 miles in third gear. Relaxing but dull.

    M.
     
  7. Seth Jayson

    Seth Jayson Guest

    Sucks to have to trash a relatively new tire because of a rip, but:

    New tire: $25-$60 bucks, depending.

    Trip to the Emergency Room after patched tire fails during fast descent: $250 minimum.

    Of course, our Danish friend may not have to shell out that kind of dough for a trip to
    the hospital.
     
  8. "Seth Jayson" skrev...
    > Trip to the Emergency Room after patched tire fails during fast descent: $250 minimum.
    >
    > Of course, our Danish friend may not have to shell out that kind of dough for a trip to the
    > hospital.

    Nope, already paid via our taxes. I'll spare you folks a trip to the ER by not mentioning how much
    we pay. ;-)

    Anyway rip is across the thread and so far not critical but I'll keep an eye on it.

    M.
     
  9. Derral

    Derral Guest

    I have had some good results by making a boot out of a piece of rim tape, the type that is made with
    a heavy fabric with adhesive backing, such as the "Velo brand". I had a cut in a road bike tire
    (120psi) and used a piece of rim tape for a temporary fix, that was over a year ago, and am still
    using it. This cut was bad enough to cause a bulge in the tire and the tube was showing through the
    cut, the rim tape was strong enough to prevent the tire from bulging.

    "Mikael Seierup" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Took a direct hit from a piece of glass in my front S-Licks the other day. Left a nice 10 mm long
    > rip in the tire. Was just wondering if theres any way to glue it and keep the tire a bit longer? I
    > already put a nice thick tireboot of rubber in, but I think that rip is going to grow and the tire
    > is fairly new.
    >
    > M.
     
  10. Bentheadswb

    Bentheadswb Guest

    > I already put a nice thick tireboot of rubber in,
    >> but I think that rip is going to grow and the tire is fairly new.
    >>
    >> M.

    If it was a back tire, I would just watch it to see what it will do. However, it is your front tire
    and that could make a mess when it blows. I would just replace it.

    John H N TX
     
  11. Mike

    Mike Guest

    maybe a combo of shoe goo and tylex material as a laminate? no idea if it would work , just a
    suggestion..
     
  12. Derral

    Derral Guest

    It's a rear tire, like I said it's been a year now, it's the same status as the day I put the temp
    repair in. I'm going to replace it, just haven't taken the time to do it yet, to many other
    priorities.

    "BentHeadSWB" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > I already put a nice thick tireboot of rubber in,
    > >> but I think that rip is going to grow and the tire is fairly new.
    > >>
    > >> M.
    >
    > If it was a back tire, I would just watch it to see what it will do.
    However,
    > it is your front tire and that could make a mess when it blows. I would
    just
    > replace it.
    >
    > John H N TX
     
  13. Have had some luck with "Liquid Nails" paneling adhesive. 8 months and counting on a MTB tire.
    Obviously YMMV. /\/\/¨

    In article <[email protected]>, Mikael Seierup
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Dave Larrington" skrev
    >
    > > Commiserations. I had a similar thing happen to a three-week old Stelvio recently. I tried
    > > superglue, but it seemed to be reluctant to hold for very long, and eventually I had to resort
    > > to a new tyre following a Several of vists from the P*nct*r* Fairy.
    >
    > Does "superglue" glue anything but fingers? It didn't work for the tire for me either. I have in
    > fact never gotten mine to glue anything for very long so usually I just reach for the epoxy.
    >
    > The cut is in the thread and the bit of 3 mm thick rubber some nice polish gentleman donated for
    > another gammy tire last year seems to do the trick so far. And my LBS still has a few spares so I
    > can pop down and get one if it rips totally apart.
    >
    > In related news my bottom chaintube just packed it in so I got a chance to ride with the
    > returnside of the chain along the wheel and didn't like it.
    > :)
    > Damn thing hit the spokes on occasion so I rode the last 8 miles in third gear. Relaxing but dull.
    >
    > M.
     
  14. I've used "Shoe-Goo" many times to fix a damaged tire. First, I sand down the affected area and
    clean it with alcohol. Then I spread a thick film of the goo over an area a couple inches larger all
    around than the cut. I quickly press a piece of fiberglass cloth into the goo, trimmed wth rounded
    corners and smaller than the coated area. I rub it thoroughly with my fingers, to work as much of
    the goo into the weave of the cloth as possible. Then I spread another coat of goo on top and work
    it in. Then I hang the tire in a way that will make the repaired area stay straight and have a
    proper shape while it hardens overnight. Sometimes, some strips of masking tape around the tire will
    help it hold its form.

    However, I would ride on such a repaired tire only as an emergency spare or for use in times of
    severe personal poverty. I wouldn't trust it with high pressure and certainly not on a long or
    fast ride.

    If you need a tire for best performance and dependability, it would probably be best to chuck
    this damaged one, curse the beer drinkers of the world, spread some green for a new one and
    hope that your number doesn't come up again soon in the road hazards lottery.

    Steve McDonald
     
  15. The best uses for superglue are on joints with a very fine match between edges or surfaces and
    limited flexing of the joint after repair. I have has it work very well on some kinds of repair, but
    tires would be a completely inappropriate use for superglue - usually the edges of the wound are
    rough and mismatched, and considerable flexibility is required after repair.

    "JoanD'arcRoast" <JoanD'[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:020620030236187487%JoanD'[email protected]...
    > Have had some luck with "Liquid Nails" paneling adhesive. 8 months and counting on a MTB tire.
    > Obviously YMMV. /\/\/¨
    >
    > In article <[email protected]>, Mikael Seierup
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > "Dave Larrington" skrev
    > >
    > > > Commiserations. I had a similar thing happen to a three-week old
    Stelvio
    > > > recently. I tried superglue, but it seemed to be reluctant to hold
    for very
    > > > long, and eventually I had to resort to a new tyre following a Several
    of
    > > > vists from the P*nct*r* Fairy.
    > >
    > > Does "superglue" glue anything but fingers? It didn't work for the tire for me either. I have in
    > > fact never gotten mine to glue anything for
    very long
    > > so usually I just reach for the epoxy.
    > >
    > > The cut is in the thread and the bit of 3 mm thick rubber some nice polish gentleman donated for
    > > another gammy tire last year seems to do the trick so far. And my LBS still has a few spares so
    > > I can pop down and get one if it rips totally apart.
    > >
    > > In related news my bottom chaintube just packed it in so I got a chance to ride with the
    > > returnside of the chain along the wheel and didn't like
    it.
    > > :)
    > > Damn thing hit the spokes on occasion so I rode the last 8 miles in
    third gear.
    > > Relaxing but dull.
    > >
    > > M.
     
  16. Derral

    Derral Guest

    superglue works well for sealing puncture holes in tubeless mountain bike tires, haven't tried in on
    a large glass cut, but would doubt it would be effective.

    "Pieter Litchfield" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > The best uses for superglue are on joints with a very fine match between edges or surfaces and
    > limited flexing of the joint after repair. I have
    has
    > it work very well on some kinds of repair, but tires would be a completely inappropriate use for
    > superglue - usually the edges of the wound are rough and mismatched, and considerable flexibility
    > is required after repair.
    >
    > "JoanD'arcRoast" <JoanD'[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:020620030236187487%JoanD'[email protected]...
    > > Have had some luck with "Liquid Nails" paneling adhesive. 8 months and counting on a MTB tire.
    > > Obviously YMMV. /\/\/¨
    > >
    > > In article <[email protected]>, Mikael Seierup <[email protected]>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > > > "Dave Larrington" skrev
    > > >
    > > > > Commiserations. I had a similar thing happen to a three-week old
    > Stelvio
    > > > > recently. I tried superglue, but it seemed to be reluctant to hold
    > for very
    > > > > long, and eventually I had to resort to a new tyre following a
    Several
    > of
    > > > > vists from the P*nct*r* Fairy.
    > > >
    > > > Does "superglue" glue anything but fingers? It didn't work for the
    tire
    > > > for me either. I have in fact never gotten mine to glue anything for
    > very long
    > > > so usually I just reach for the epoxy.
    > > >
    > > > The cut is in the thread and the bit of 3 mm thick rubber some nice polish gentleman donated
    > > > for another gammy tire last year seems to do the trick so far. And my LBS still has a few
    > > > spares so I can pop down and get one if it rips totally apart.
    > > >
    > > > In related news my bottom chaintube just packed it in so I got a
    chance
    > > > to ride with the returnside of the chain along the wheel and didn't
    like
    > it.
    > > > :)
    > > > Damn thing hit the spokes on occasion so I rode the last 8 miles in
    > third gear.
    > > > Relaxing but dull.
    > > >
    > > > M.
     
  17. I cut my rear tyre on a supported ride a few weeks ago, and one of the LBS's fixed it wil the rim
    tape as mentioned below, and also tode me of a couple of emergnecy repairs... a dollar bill folded
    up and the wraper from a power bar (or similar) it's made of mylar apparently..

    The fix enabled me to complete the ride (another 40 or so miles). A friend of mine did the dollar
    bill approch (I found out after the ride) and rode the tyre out... about a year later.

    I've subsquently add a roll of rim tape to the repair kit a carry.

    Nigel.

    Derral wrote:
    > I have had some good results by making a boot out of a piece of rim tape, the type that is made
    > with a heavy fabric with adhesive backing, such as the "Velo brand". I had a cut in a road bike
    > tire (120psi) and used a piece of rim tape for a temporary fix, that was over a year ago, and am
    > still using it. This cut was bad enough to cause a bulge in the tire and the tube was showing
    > through the cut, the rim tape was strong enough to prevent the tire from bulging.
    >
    >
    > "Mikael Seierup" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>Took a direct hit from a piece of glass in my front S-Licks the other day. Left a nice 10 mm long
    >>rip in the tire. Was just wondering if theres any way to glue it and keep the tire a bit longer? I
    >>already put a nice thick tireboot of rubber in, but I think that rip is going to grow and the tire
    >>is fairly new.
    >>
    >>M.
    >
     
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