Repairing Rolf freehub? Parts?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by res09c5t, Sep 9, 2005.

  1. res09c5t

    res09c5t Guest

    Hi,
    I'm helping a friend who is having trouble with his Rolf Vector Pro freehub.
    Under strong torque, it skips internally- the whole cassette spins. I
    haven't taken it off yet or gotten it apart to see what actually has failed.
    Does anyone have any experience/knowledge of this? Are repair parts
    available for these since Rolf split off from Trek?

    Thanks!
    Lyle
     
    Tags:


  2. > Hi,
    > I'm helping a friend who is having trouble with his Rolf Vector Pro
    > freehub. Under strong torque, it skips internally- the whole cassette
    > spins. I haven't taken it off yet or gotten it apart to see what actually
    > has failed. Does anyone have any experience/knowledge of this? Are repair
    > parts available for these since Rolf split off from Trek?
    >
    > Thanks!
    > Lyle


    Lyle: Parts are available (the hub is actually made by Hugi, so it's likely
    even a non-Trek dealer has access to them), but you probably don't need any.
    Most likely it just needs to be cleaned up & re-lubed. It's an extremely
    simple mechanism that's pretty tough to kill. The main problem is that it's
    very picky about the grease used; the stuff they recommend works great but
    costs a fortune (about $9 for a tiny little tube, I mean really tiny, but
    you don't need much so it will last quite a few years).

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  3. res09c5t

    res09c5t Guest

    The main problem is that it's
    > very picky about the grease used; the stuff they recommend works great but
    > costs a fortune (about $9 for a tiny little tube, I mean really tiny, but
    > you don't need much so it will last quite a few years).
    >


    Any ideas or suggestions for an equivalent grease? Is it just a relatively
    thin or light grease that won't keep the star ratchets from making contact?

    Thanks!
     
  4. res09c5t wrote:
    > The main problem is that it's
    > > very picky about the grease used; the stuff they recommend works great but
    > > costs a fortune (about $9 for a tiny little tube, I mean really tiny, but
    > > you don't need much so it will last quite a few years).
    > >

    >
    > Any ideas or suggestions for an equivalent grease? Is it just a relatively
    > thin or light grease that won't keep the star ratchets from making contact?
    >
    > Thanks!


    It is low viscosity (I assume to avoid gluing the ratches in
    "freewheel" mode), but I suspect the truly special part is that it
    doesn't gum up with age as much as other greases might.
     
  5. >> Any ideas or suggestions for an equivalent grease? Is it just a
    >> relatively
    >> thin or light grease that won't keep the star ratchets from making
    >> contact?
    >>
    >> Thanks!

    >
    > It is low viscosity (I assume to avoid gluing the ratches in
    > "freewheel" mode), but I suspect the truly special part is that it
    > doesn't gum up with age as much as other greases might.


    Correct, it stays thin over time. Anything that thickens up fouls the
    mechanism. I've heard of people temporarily lubing them with Phil tenacious
    oil, but it probably makes sense to spend the $$$ and have the right stuff.
    It will last for many, many years of cleaning & relubrication.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  6. res09c5t

    res09c5t Guest

    The Phil oil idea sounds good as a test to see whether it is just the grease
    or whether the ratchets are truly worn. If it works ok with the oil, then
    we can invest in the grease. If not, we can find a maintenance kit with the
    ratchets and I believe it comes with the grease.
    Thanks!


    "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >>> Any ideas or suggestions for an equivalent grease? Is it just a
    >>> relatively
    >>> thin or light grease that won't keep the star ratchets from making
    >>> contact?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks!

    >>
    >> It is low viscosity (I assume to avoid gluing the ratches in
    >> "freewheel" mode), but I suspect the truly special part is that it
    >> doesn't gum up with age as much as other greases might.

    >
    > Correct, it stays thin over time. Anything that thickens up fouls the
    > mechanism. I've heard of people temporarily lubing them with Phil
    > tenacious oil, but it probably makes sense to spend the $$$ and have the
    > right stuff. It will last for many, many years of cleaning &
    > relubrication.
    >
    > --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    > www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
    >
     
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