replace chain?



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K

Kbh

Guest
I just installed a new crankset, and a new cassette. However I have a chain with about 2000 miles on
it, and seemingly plenty of life left. Should I replace the chain with a new one?

KBH
 
J

Jim Flom

Guest
"KBH" wrote ...
> I just installed a new crankset, and a new cassette. However I have a
chain
> with about 2000 miles on it, and seemingly plenty of life left. Should I replace the chain with a
> new one?

There's no downside to installing a new chain with a new cassette, etc. I would. That chain is in
the autumn of its life anyway.
 
K

Kbh

Guest
But if the chain shows no signs of wear (i.e. 12 links line up EXACTLY with 12 inches) then is
there an issue?

"Jim Flom" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
>
> "KBH" wrote ...
> > I just installed a new crankset, and a new cassette. However I have a
> chain
> > with about 2000 miles on it, and seemingly plenty of life left. Should
I
> > replace the chain with a new one?
>
> There's no downside to installing a new chain with a new cassette, etc. I would. That chain is in
> the autumn of its life anyway.
 
R

Ron Hardin

Guest
KBH wrote:
>
> I just installed a new crankset, and a new cassette. However I have a chain with about 2000 miles
> on it, and seemingly plenty of life left. Should I replace the chain with a new one?
>
> KBH

You'll lose it on the other end, because the next new chain won't work on the cassette.
--
Ron Hardin [email protected]

On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
 
C

Charles Berry

Guest
If old one is shiney, please ck with your jewelery maker.

KBH wrote:

> I just installed a new crankset, and a new cassette. However I have a chain with about 2000 miles
> on it, and seemingly plenty of life left. Should I replace the chain with a new one?
>
> KBH
 
H

Harris

Guest
KBH <[email protected]> wrote:
> I just installed a new crankset, and a new cassette. However I have a chain with about 2000 miles
> on it, and seemingly plenty of life left. Should I replace the chain with a new one?

Not necessary if the chain isn't worn, but I wouldn't expect to get much more life out of that chain
anyway. I assume you know about measuring the chain. When a nominal 12" section (24 links) measures
12-1/16" replace the chain or risk wearing out the cassette.

Chain wear depends on lots of things (cleanliness, lubrication, rider weight, etc). I usually get
about 3000 miles from a chain.

Art Harris
 
P

Peter Cole

Guest
"KBH" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> But if the chain shows no signs of wear (i.e. 12 links line up EXACTLY with 12 inches) then is
> there an issue?

It's surprising that a chain with 2K miles has no wear, but if true, using it should create
no problems.
 
K

Kbh

Guest
Without very precise measuring instruments, I don't see how anyone can confidently measure an extra
1/16th of an inch out of 12. Even when the chain is taught, it must droop some, so in order to
really do this, the chain must be lying flat on a flat surface, which is difficult/impossible to do
without removing the chain from the bike.

Anyways, I have a PC-99 waiting to be used, so I'll put it on and be done with it.

Thanks,

Kyle

"Harris" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> KBH <[email protected]> wrote:
> > I just installed a new crankset, and a new cassette. However I have a
chain
> > with about 2000 miles on it, and seemingly plenty of life left. Should
I
> > replace the chain with a new one?
>
> Not necessary if the chain isn't worn, but I wouldn't expect to get much more life out of that
> chain anyway. I assume you know about measuring the chain. When a nominal 12" section (24 links)
> measures 12-1/16" replace the chain or risk wearing out the cassette.
>
> Chain wear depends on lots of things (cleanliness, lubrication, rider weight, etc). I usually get
> about 3000 miles from a chain.
>
> Art Harris
 
T

Terry Morse

Guest
KBH wrote:

> Without very precise measuring instruments, I don't see how anyone can confidently measure an
> extra 1/16th of an inch out of 12. Even when the chain is taught, it must droop some, so in order
> to really do this, the chain must be lying flat on a flat surface, which is difficult/impossible
> to do without removing the chain from the bike.

With a yardstick laid across the top of the chain, measuring 1/16th of an inch is very easy. There
is no significant sag in the chain.
--
terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://www.terrymorse.com/bike/
 
J

John Everett

Guest
On Wed, 19 Feb 2003 14:00:32 GMT, Harris <[email protected]> wrote:

>KBH <[email protected]> wrote:
>> I just installed a new crankset, and a new cassette. However I have a chain with about 2000 miles
>> on it, and seemingly plenty of life left. Should I replace the chain with a new one?
>
>Not necessary if the chain isn't worn, but I wouldn't expect to get much more life out of that
>chain anyway. I assume you know about measuring the chain. When a nominal 12" section (24 links)
>measures 12-1/16" replace the chain or risk wearing out the cassette.
>
>Chain wear depends on lots of things (cleanliness, lubrication, rider weight, etc). I usually get
>about 3000 miles from a chain.

If a chain is kept clean and well lubricated it will last a very long time indeed. I've gotten over
18,500 miles from a Dura Ace chain, and when it broke (see my posting on the "HG Chain Compatibility
Question" thread) it still wasn't worn out. The point is, at 2000 miles the chain in question may
indeed be in good enough condition to run with a new cassette and rings.

The only way to know for sure is to measure it, but considering the cost of the new equipment vs. a
new chain I'd be tempted to replace it if measurement shows any wear at all.

jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
 
G

Gary Smiley

Guest
Peter- I have two bikes - a road bike and a city/commuter/hybrid bike. The hybrid goes through 2
chains per year (around 2000 mi). But when I replaced the chain on my roadbike after 2000 miles, it
had no stretch at all. The roadbike only goes in fair weather on long country rides, and the chain
never gets dirty. The hybrid goes in snow, salt, mud, sand, and all kinds of grunge, and no matter
how often I clean the chain, it maks no difference- it wears too quickly. But I replaced the 2000
mile roadbike chain, not because I needed to, but because everybody told me I was supposed to (also
because I replaced the cassette, which wasn't worn either).

Peter Cole wrote:

> "KBH" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> > But if the chain shows no signs of wear (i.e. 12 links line up EXACTLY with 12 inches) then is
> > there an issue?
>
> It's surprising that a chain with 2K miles has no wear, but if true, using it should create no
> problems.
 
P

Peter Cole

Guest
"Gary Smiley" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> Peter- I have two bikes - a road bike and a city/commuter/hybrid bike. The
hybrid
> goes through 2 chains per year (around 2000 mi). But when I replaced the
chain on
> my roadbike after 2000 miles, it had no stretch at all. The roadbike only
goes in
> fair weather on long country rides, and the chain never gets dirty. The
hybrid
> goes in snow, salt, mud, sand, and all kinds of grunge, and no matter how
often I
> clean the chain, it maks no difference- it wears too quickly. But I replaced
the
> 2000 mile roadbike chain, not because I needed to, but because everybody
told me
> I was supposed to (also because I replaced the cassette, which wasn't worn either).

Interesting. I've never kept a bike for good weather only riding, so I had no idea how long a clean
chain would last under ideal conditions.
 
J

Jobst Brandt

Guest
John Everett writes:

> If a chain is kept clean and well lubricated it will last a very long time indeed. I've gotten
> over 18,500 miles from a Dura Ace chain, and when it broke (see my posting on the "HG Chain
> Compatibility Question" thread) it still wasn't worn out. The point is, at 2000 miles the chain in
> question may indeed be in good enough condition to run with a new cassette and rings.

I'm curious. Are you sure you didn't mean 1850 miles? What was the wear at that time? I have seen
chains that were 1/4" off per foot and looked perfect on the ruler when looking only at the
endpoints, the place where the chain was again in synch with 1/4 inch marks.

How long did it take to put on these miles and where do you ride where there is so little dust, let
alone rain and grit that, you got essentially no wear?

> The only way to know for sure is to measure it, but considering the cost of the new equipment vs.
> a new chain I'd be tempted to replace it if measurement shows any wear at all.

Something doesn't add up here.

Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
 
D

David L. Johnso

Guest
On Wed, 19 Feb 2003 11:44:33 -0500, John Everett wrote:

> If a chain is kept clean and well lubricated it will last a very long time indeed. I've gotten
> over 18,500 miles from a Dura Ace chain, and when it broke ... it still wasn't worn out.

Hello, what would your criterion for "worn out" be?

Frankly, I think you are being penny-wise and pound foolish to try to get anywhere near that many
miles out of a chain. By the time you would have replaced this chain that was in such good condition
when it broke in half, your cassette ($40-$60) and chainrings ($50 or so, depending) would have worn
out to get more miles out of a $15 chain.

--

David L. Johnson

__o | "What am I on? I'm on my bike, six hours a day, busting my ass. _`\(,_ | What are you on?"
--Lance Armstrong (_)/ (_) |
 
J

John Everett

Guest
On Thu, 20 Feb 2003 03:23:58 GMT, [email protected] wrote:

>John Everett writes:
>
>> If a chain is kept clean and well lubricated it will last a very long time indeed. I've gotten
>> over 18,500 miles from a Dura Ace chain, and when it broke (see my posting on the "HG Chain
>> Compatibility Question" thread) it still wasn't worn out. The point is, at 2000 miles the chain
>> in question may indeed be in good enough condition to run with a new cassette and rings.
>
>I'm curious. Are you sure you didn't mean 1850 miles? What was the wear at that time? I have seen
>chains that were 1/4" off per foot and looked perfect on the ruler when looking only at the
>endpoints, the place where the chain was again in synch with 1/4 inch marks.
>
>How long did it take to put on these miles and where do you ride where there is so little dust, let
>alone rain and grit that, you got essentially no wear?
>
>> The only way to know for sure is to measure it, but considering the cost of the new equipment vs.
>> a new chain I'd be tempted to replace it if measurement shows any wear at all.
>
>Something doesn't add up here.

Jobst, if you rode with me you'd find it adds up perfectly. The chain in question came new on my
Vitus 992, purchased in 1992. That was, and remains, my "good bike". I live in Illinois (flatlands),
and never, never, never ride that bike in the rain.

I'm also a bit anal about cleanliness, particularly on that bike. As I've posted previously, I
regularly remove, thoroughly clean (scrub with Simple Green and a stiff toothbrush) and hot wax my
chains. At the same time I generally remove the rings and cogs (that bike came with loose cogs, not
a riveted cassette) and clean them individually.

I know how to measure a chain for wear. :) I always measure over two feet (instead of one), and as
I seem to recall (that chain let go in 1995 or 1996) it measured slightly over 1/16" of wear (over
two feet) when it let go.

I replaced that chain with another Dura Ace and rode for another few years (again, avoiding rain or
winter riding) but lost track of mileage. It was easy to track the first chain's mileage because the
bike, chain, and cyclocomputer's odo all started at zero.

A couple of years ago I upgraded the Vitus to 9-speed (Dura Ace), and used the extra bits to upgrade
my beater (Trek 1400) from 7-speed to 8-speed. The ORIGINAL 8-speed cassette is still in use on the
Trek, at least in one form or another. Since the cogs are loose I regularly mix and match, but some
of the original cogs are still on the Trek. I believe the Vitus came with 12-21, but on the Trek
it's currently 12-27 (or so); which is left over from a Rocky Mountain trip last summer. I'm sure I
could reconstitute the original cluster if I wanted to. My conservative estimate is that the
original cluster (at least most of the cogs) have seen well over 40,000 miles, as have the rings
which are still on the Vitus.

As a former engineer with Porsche (correct, Jobst?) you're no doubt aware that chains drove the cams
on the original 911 engine (and lots of other engines for that matter). In a clean and well
lubricated environment a chain will last a very long time indeed. Why would you expect it to be any
different on a bike?

BTW, as I sit here I'm having a hard time remembering if the 911 had two chains or just one long
one. I last rebuilt one (for an SCCA C-Production race car) in 1972. Was it two chains or one? In
any case it was the longest chain run I've ever seen on an engine.

jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
 
J

John Everett

Guest
On Thu, 20 Feb 2003 02:36:37 GMT, "Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>Interesting. I've never kept a bike for good weather only riding, so I had no idea how long a clean
>chain would last under ideal conditions.

Really, really long. See my response to Jobst elsewhere in this thread.

jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
 
J

John Everett

Guest
On Wed, 19 Feb 2003 23:08:03 -0500, "David L. Johnson" <David L. Johnson
<[email protected]>> wrote:

>On Wed, 19 Feb 2003 11:44:33 -0500, John Everett wrote:
>
>> If a chain is kept clean and well lubricated it will last a very long time indeed. I've gotten
>> over 18,500 miles from a Dura Ace chain, and when it broke ... it still wasn't worn out.
>
>Hello, what would your criterion for "worn out" be?
>
>Frankly, I think you are being penny-wise and pound foolish to try to get anywhere near that many
>miles out of a chain. By the time you would have replaced this chain that was in such good
>condition when it broke in half, your cassette ($40-$60) and chainrings ($50 or so, depending)
>would have worn out to get more miles out of a $15 chain.

Not so at all. See my response to Jobst.

jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
 
A

Andrew Webster

Guest
"Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...

> Interesting. I've never kept a bike for good weather only riding, so I had no idea how long a
> clean chain would last under ideal conditions.

I have a road bike only used in dry weather in the summer. It has had the same chain since it was
new (early 70s). Low mileage (500-1000 per year), but virtually no sign of wear.

My all weather everyday bike gets through a chain a year (about 7000 miles), by that time the chain
is hanging off at the front and rear sprockets are worn out too.

Water, dirt and dust seem to be very important factors (though I have a sneaking suspicion that new
9-speed chains are intinsically less durable that old 5-speed).

The same appears to apply to hubs, the fair weather bike still has the original campy hubs, the all
weather one goes through an average of a set of hubs in about a year too - all due to water
penetration judging by the amount of rust coloured sludge inside, usually on one side only.
 
J

John Everett

Guest
On Thu, 20 Feb 2003 03:23:58 GMT, [email protected] wrote:

>John Everett writes:
>
>> If a chain is kept clean and well lubricated it will last a very long time indeed. I've gotten
>> over 18,500 miles from a Dura Ace chain, and when it broke (see my posting on the "HG Chain
>> Compatibility Question" thread) it still wasn't worn out.
>
>I'm curious. Are you sure you didn't mean 1850 miles? What was the wear at that time?
>
>Something doesn't add up here.

Looks like I've been exaggerating for some time. By dint of some Googleing I found the following,
posted right here on r.b.t. April 23, 1997.

From: http://groups.google.com/groups?q=high+mileage+chain+group:rec.bicycles.*+author:john+author:-
everett&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&as_drrb=b&as_mind=12&as_minm=5&as_miny=1981&as_maxd=20&as_maxm=-
2&as_maxy=2003&selm=5jl5jk%24e47%241%40kirin.wwa.com&rnum=2

"As promised, I cleaned and waxed my road bike chains yesterday afternoon. I decided it was finally
time to replace my high mileage Dura-Ace chain because it had 3/32" of "stretch" over two feet, but
I though I'd run it until it needed waxing again. So I put it back on the bike and headed for last
evening's club ride. On the ride I was telling the group that I'd finally decided to replace my high
mileage chain, and we got into a discussion of chain cleaning, lubrication, and life expectancy.
Within a couple of miles, while I was downshifting the front derailleur, the chain came apart. It
looks like one of the pins pulled out. So after 18,138.6 miles of repeatedly pushing pins in and
out, one of them failed. Guess I should have been using those black pins all along;-).

"When I finally reached the parking lot at the end of the ride with a chain now one inch shorter, I
was (of course) greeted with hoots of dirision and a chorus of "Workin' on a Chain Gang". So My
Dura-Ace chain (at least most of the links) made it to 18,142.4 miles."

Guess I'll stop claiming I got 18,500 miles out of a chain.


jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
 
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