Replacement chain hard to find ...

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Jerry C., Jun 5, 2003.

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  1. Jerry C.

    Jerry C. Guest

    I have a Bianchi circa 1987/1988. It is in good condition save for the chain, which has never been
    replaced. My local bike shop told me that they couldn't replace the chain and it would be cost
    prohibitive to replace the other related component: rear 6 speed cassette, front dbl chainring. I
    have two questions:

    1) Can an appropriate chain be found to replace mine?
    2) Can more gears be economically added for climbing hills? (new rear derailleur and new rear
    cassette??)

    Components of my bike: front double chainring - Bianchi 42/52 rear 6 speed cassette - Suntour Winner
    Pro BJ 13/24 front derailleur - Campy Nuovo Record ??? rear derailleur - Campy Nuovo Record

    Any feedback would be much appreciated.

    Jerry Cipriano
     
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  2. Ajames54

    Ajames54 Guest

    On Thu, 05 Jun 2003 19:26:24 GMT, "Jerry C." <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I have a Bianchi circa 1987/1988. It is in good condition save for the chain, which has never been
    >replaced. My local bike shop told me that they couldn't replace the chain and it would be cost
    >prohibitive to replace the other related component: rear 6 speed cassette, front dbl chainring. I
    >have two questions:
    >
    >1) Can an appropriate chain be found to replace mine?
    >2) Can more gears be economically added for climbing hills? (new rear derailleur and new rear
    > cassette??)
    >
    >Components of my bike: front double chainring - Bianchi 42/52 rear 6 speed cassette - Suntour
    >Winner Pro BJ 13/24 front derailleur - Campy Nuovo Record ??? rear derailleur - Campy Nuovo Record
    >
    >Any feedback would be much appreciated.
    >
    >Jerry Cipriano

    Someone at your local shop is sniffing glue...

    Parts are still available...

    Sheldon would probably be able to help if not try

    http://www.bikeville.com/freewheels.html
     
  3. Kbh

    Kbh Guest

    Hogwash. Any 7/8 speed chain will work fine. SRAM PC-48 is $10-$15.

    You could change that 42 to a 39 (or 38 if its 130 BCD) for a little help.

    "Jerry C." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I have a Bianchi circa 1987/1988. It is in good condition save for the chain, which has never been
    > replaced. My local bike shop told me that they couldn't replace the chain and it would be cost
    > prohibitive to replace the other related component: rear 6 speed cassette, front dbl chainring. I
    > have two questions:
    >
    > 1) Can an appropriate chain be found to replace mine?
    > 2) Can more gears be economically added for climbing hills? (new rear derailleur and new rear
    > cassette??)
    >
    > Components of my bike: front double chainring - Bianchi 42/52 rear 6 speed cassette - Suntour
    > Winner Pro BJ 13/24 front derailleur - Campy Nuovo Record ??? rear derailleur - Campy Nuovo Record
    >
    > Any feedback would be much appreciated.
    >
    > Jerry Cipriano
     
  4. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Guest

    On Fri, 06 Jun 2003 00:03:32 GMT, "KBH" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Hogwash. Any 7/8 speed chain will work fine. SRAM PC-48 is $10-$15.
    >
    >You could change that 42 to a 39 (or 38 if its 130 BCD) for a little help.
    >
    >

    The problem with putting on a new chain is that the rest of the drive train is probably so worn that
    nothing will work with the new chain.

    The chainwheels are probably older Campy circle size- 144mm? I have a Bianchi from this time period,
    and the cranks are labeled 'Bianchi' but are Ofmega copies of Campy. These could be the most
    expensive part of the rebuild. 41 or 42 teeth is the smallest that will fit. A new crank set could
    be the cleanest way to deal with this.

    Freewheels are available, six speeds. Be careful about putting a seven speed on- I couldn't get one
    to fit my Bianchi.

    If indexing isn't an issue, any derailleur will work. Just check the maximum rear sprocket it
    will handle.

    And find another bike shop. The one you talked to is NOT the one to help you with this.

    >
    >"Jerry C." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> I have a Bianchi circa 1987/1988. It is in good condition save for the chain, which has never
    >> been replaced. My local bike shop told me that they couldn't replace the chain and it would be
    >> cost prohibitive to replace the other related component: rear 6 speed cassette, front dbl
    >> chainring. I have two questions:
    >>
    >> 1) Can an appropriate chain be found to replace mine?
    >> 2) Can more gears be economically added for climbing hills? (new rear derailleur and new rear
    >> cassette??)
    >>
    >> Components of my bike: front double chainring - Bianchi 42/52 rear 6 speed cassette -
    >> Suntour Winner Pro BJ 13/24 front derailleur - Campy Nuovo Record ??? rear derailleur -
    >> Campy Nuovo Record
    >>
    >> Any feedback would be much appreciated.
    >>
    >> Jerry Cipriano
    >
     
  5. jerryci-<< I have a Bianchi circa 1987/1988 << My local bike shop told me that they couldn't replace
    the chain and it would be cost prohibitive to replace the other related component: rear 6 speed
    cassette, front dbl chainring. I have two questions:

    Use a Sram PC-48, any 7s casette with one cog removed and any chainrinmgs(like Sugino for
    about $18 per)

    To add cogs, you need a new freehub body for the rear wheel. You are friction, see above, not
    expensive.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  6. Jerry C.

    Jerry C. Guest

    Peter,

    I was thinking of phoning you. I have a couple of questions now that you have replied.

    Jerry C.
    --------------------

    Qui si parla Campagnolo wrote:
    > jerryci-<< I have a Bianchi circa 1987/1988 << My local bike shop told me that they couldn't
    > replace the chain and it would be cost prohibitive to replace the other related component: rear 6
    > speed cassette, front dbl chainring. I have two questions:
    >
    > Use a Sram PC-48, any 7s casette with one cog removed and any chainrinmgs(like Sugino for about
    > $18 per)
    >
    > To add cogs, you need a new freehub body for the rear wheel. You are friction, see above, not
    > expensive.
    >
    >
    > Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    > (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  7. Jerry C.

    Jerry C. Guest

    Dan,

    I believe your answer is very helpful, partially because you have a similar bike, and your answer
    seems to understand what the local bike shop technician was thinking (right or wrong). I'm working
    under the assumption that they are not stupid and are not lying to me to coerce me to buy a new
    bike. They are probably ignorant of alternative fixes or sources for parts. I didn't elaborate on
    the bike shop technicians comments, but he did mention something about how the worn components had
    changed tolerances (or something like that), and he couldn't get that chain or some other part any
    more. I should have remembered the specifics of what he said better.

    Indexing isn't an issue. I understand you to be suggesting a new front sprocket (perhaps 41/52), a
    new chain, and a new bike shop. There is a chance that a new 7 speed cassette in the rear will not
    fit. Due to wear on my current 6 spd cassette, will a new cassette (either 6 or 7 speed) be required
    if I change the chain?

    Jerry C.
    ---------------------------------
    Dan Daniel wrote:
    >
    > The problem with putting on a new chain is that the rest of the drive train is probably so worn
    > that nothing will work with the new chain.
    >
    > The chainwheels are probably older Campy circle size- 144mm? I have a Bianchi from this time
    > period, and the cranks are labeled 'Bianchi' but are Ofmega copies of Campy. These could be the
    > most expensive part of the rebuild. 41 or 42 teeth is the smallest that will fit. A new crank set
    > could be the cleanest way to deal with this.
    >
    > Freewheels are available, six speeds. Be careful about putting a seven speed on- I couldn't get
    > one to fit my Bianchi.
    >
    > If indexing isn't an issue, any derailleur will work. Just check the maximum rear sprocket it
    > will handle.
    >
    > And find another bike shop. The one you talked to is NOT the one to help you with this.
    ----------------------------------------
    >> On Fri, 06 Jun 2003 00:03:32 GMT, "KBH" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> Hogwash. Any 7/8 speed chain will work fine. SRAM PC-48 is $10-$15. You could change that 42 to a
    >> 39 (or 38 if its 130 BCD) for a little help.

    ---------------------------
    >>>"Jerry C." <[email protected]> wrote in ORIGINAL message
    >>>
    >>>I have a Bianchi circa 1987/1988. It is in good condition save for the chain, which has never
    >>>been replaced. My local bike shop told me that they couldn't replace the chain and it would be
    >>>cost prohibitive to replace the other related component: rear 6 speed cassette, front dbl
    >>>chainring. I have two questions:
    >>>
    >>>1) Can an appropriate chain be found to replace mine?
    >>>2) Can more gears be economically added for climbing hills? (new rear derailleur and new rear
    >>> cassette??)
    >>>
    >>>Components of my bike: front double chainring - Bianchi 42/52 rear 6 speed cassette -
    >>>Suntour Winner Pro BJ 13/24 front derailleur - Campy Nuovo Record ??? rear derailleur -
    >>>Campy Nuovo Record
    >>>
    >>>Any feedback would be much appreciated.
    >>>
    >>>Jerry Cipriano
     
  8. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "Jerry C." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I have a Bianchi circa 1987/1988. It is in good condition save for the chain, which has never been
    > replaced. My local bike shop told me that they couldn't replace the chain and it would be cost
    > prohibitive to replace the other related component: rear 6 speed cassette, front dbl chainring. I
    > have two questions:
    >
    > 1) Can an appropriate chain be found to replace mine?
    > 2) Can more gears be economically added for climbing hills? (new rear derailleur and new rear
    > cassette??)
    >
    > Components of my bike: front double chainring - Bianchi 42/52 rear 6 speed cassette - Suntour
    > Winner Pro BJ 13/24 front derailleur - Campy Nuovo Record ??? rear derailleur - Campy Nuovo Record
    >
    > Any feedback would be much appreciated.
    >
    > Jerry Cipriano
    >
    Is your rear wheel for freewheel or cassette? You say cassette but I'm fairly certain it is a
    freewheel. Chains for six speed are readliy available ( KMC) and cheap. Six speed freewheels abound,
    $19.95 and up

    If it is indeed a Suntour Cassette ( which I doubt) build a new wheel with a modern cassette, seven
    being the most supported and affordable.
    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  9. Jerry C.

    Jerry C. Guest

    Andrew,

    I don't know the difference between a freewheel and a cassette. I'm using lingo that I picked up
    here in RBT and I'm hoping I'm using it correctly. Inside the smallest toothed gear is an
    independent cylinder with "Suntour Winner Pro BJ" printed on it.

    Regarding a 7 spd cassette, there is approximately 1/2" space (with a bearing in it?) between my
    smallest gear and the inside of the frame.

    Jerry Cipriano
    ---------------------------------

    > Is your rear wheel for freewheel or cassette? You say cassette but I'm fairly certain it is a
    > freewheel. Chains for six speed are readliy available ( KMC) and cheap. Six speed freewheels
    > abound, $19.95 and up
    >
    > If it is indeed a Suntour Cassette ( which I doubt) build a new wheel with a modern cassette,
    > seven being the most supported and affordable.
    > --
    > Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org
     
  10. Jerry C.

    Jerry C. Guest

    Andrew,

    I just spoke to Peter Chisholm on the phone and he clarified what you already suspected. I have a 6
    spd FREEWHEEL. Ergo, my understanding is that I need a new chain (KMC, Sugino), 6- or 7-speed
    freewheel (Shimano, Falcon, Sachs), and (depending on wear) crankshaft.

    My remaining question: I currently have a Bianchi 42/52 crankshaft. I don't believe a triple crank
    will fit. To make hills a little easier, would it make a NOTICEABLE difference to replace the 42/52
    crank with a
    41/52 and make a similar but small change in the freewheel gearing? Or is it better to keep the
    crankshaft front gearing the same and simply change the gearing on the freewheel. What is the
    maximum recommended gear ratios for a 6 speed freewheel and a 7 speed freewheel (if it fits)?

    Jerry C.
     
  11. Jerry C. wrote:

    > I don't know the difference between a freewheel and a cassette.

    This is actually an important distinction when you're looking for replacement parts.

    I have an article on how to tell the difference: http://sheldonbrown.com/free-k7.html

    > Inside the smallest toothed gear is an independent cylinder with "Suntour Winner Pro BJ"
    > printed on it.

    You're in luck, it's a freewheel! Any common freewheel with the same number of sprockets will work.
    See: http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/freewheels.html

    Sheldon "Problem Solved" Brown +----------------------------------------------+
    | Any priest or shaman must be presumed | guilty until proved innocent. | --Robert A. Heinlein |
    +----------------------------------------------+ Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts Phone
    617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041 http://harriscyclery.com Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
    http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
  12. Kbh

    Kbh Guest

    Rule of thumb I follow is replace the chain first. If that doesn't fix whatever problem you're
    having (skipping, etc), then replace the freewheel/chainrings. Unless of course you KNOW these are
    worn badly.

    "Jerry C." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Dan,
    >
    > I believe your answer is very helpful, partially because you have a similar bike, and your answer
    > seems to understand what the local bike shop technician was thinking (right or wrong). I'm working
    > under the assumption that they are not stupid and are not lying to me to coerce me to buy a new
    > bike. They are probably ignorant of alternative fixes or sources for parts. I didn't elaborate on
    > the bike shop technicians comments, but he did mention something about how the worn components had
    > changed tolerances (or something like that), and he couldn't get that chain or some other part any
    > more. I should have remembered the specifics of what he said better.
    >
    > Indexing isn't an issue. I understand you to be suggesting a new front sprocket (perhaps 41/52), a
    > new chain, and a new bike shop. There is a chance that a new 7 speed cassette in the rear will not
    > fit. Due to wear on my current 6 spd cassette, will a new cassette (either 6 or 7 speed) be
    > required if I change the chain?
    >
    > Jerry C.
    > ---------------------------------
    > Dan Daniel wrote:
    > >
    > > The problem with putting on a new chain is that the rest of the drive train is probably so worn
    > > that nothing will work with the new chain.
    > >
    > > The chainwheels are probably older Campy circle size- 144mm? I have a Bianchi from this time
    > > period, and the cranks are labeled 'Bianchi' but are Ofmega copies of Campy. These could be the
    > > most expensive part of the rebuild. 41 or 42 teeth is the smallest that will fit. A new crank
    > > set could be the cleanest way to deal with this.
    > >
    > > Freewheels are available, six speeds. Be careful about putting a seven speed on- I couldn't get
    > > one to fit my Bianchi.
    > >
    > > If indexing isn't an issue, any derailleur will work. Just check the maximum rear sprocket it
    > > will handle.
    > >
    > > And find another bike shop. The one you talked to is NOT the one to help you with this.
    > ----------------------------------------
    > >> On Fri, 06 Jun 2003 00:03:32 GMT, "KBH" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>
    > >> Hogwash. Any 7/8 speed chain will work fine. SRAM PC-48 is $10-$15. You could change that 42 to
    > >> a 39 (or 38 if its 130 BCD) for a little
    help.
    >
    > ---------------------------
    > >>>"Jerry C." <[email protected]> wrote in ORIGINAL message
    > >>>
    > >>>I have a Bianchi circa 1987/1988. It is in good condition save for the chain, which has never
    > >>>been replaced. My local bike shop told me that they couldn't replace the chain and it would be
    > >>>cost prohibitive to replace the other related component: rear 6 speed cassette, front dbl
    > >>>chainring. I have two questions:
    > >>>
    > >>>1) Can an appropriate chain be found to replace mine?
    > >>>2) Can more gears be economically added for climbing hills? (new rear derailleur and new rear
    > >>> cassette??)
    > >>>
    > >>>Components of my bike: front double chainring - Bianchi 42/52 rear 6 speed cassette - Suntour
    > >>>Winner Pro BJ 13/24 front derailleur - Campy Nuovo Record ??? rear derailleur - Campy Nuovo
    > >>>Record
    > >>>
    > >>>Any feedback would be much appreciated.
    > >>>
    > >>>Jerry Cipriano
     
  13. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Guest

    On Fri, 06 Jun 2003 20:28:20 GMT, "Jerry C." <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Dan,
    >
    >I believe your answer is very helpful, partially because you have a similar bike, and your answer
    >seems to understand what the local bike shop technician was thinking (right or wrong). I'm working
    >under the assumption that they are not stupid and are not lying to me to coerce me to buy a new
    >bike. They are probably ignorant of alternative fixes or sources for parts.

    Or they know full well where to get the parts, but are trying to scare you from entering into a full
    replacement of your drive train? It can be a slippery slope- what starts as a new chain turns into a
    new everything, and you might as well do the bottom bracket while you are at it :)

    Price out a full drivetrain, and be prepared to spend up to that amount. If you want lower gearing,
    price out new cranks and derailleurs, also.

    > I didn't elaborate on the bike shop technicians comments, but he did mention something about how
    > the worn components had changed tolerances (or something like that), and he couldn't get that
    > chain or some other part any more. I should have remembered the specifics of what he said better.
    >

    And the wear is why you need to be prepared to change everything- chain and freewheel certainly. The
    chainrings will possibly still work, but new ones will be much better.

    >Indexing isn't an issue. I understand you to be suggesting a new front sprocket (perhaps 41/52), a
    >new chain, and a new bike shop. There is a chance that a new 7 speed cassette in the rear will not
    >fit. Due to wear on my current 6 spd cassette, will a new cassette (either 6 or 7 speed) be
    >required if I change the chain?
    >
    >Jerry C.
    >---------------------------------

    Yep, plan on a new chain and freewheel (Suntour Pro Winner is a freewheel, not a casette).

    As to getting a lower gear, it is going to be hard if the chainrings are the old Campy 144mm.

    >Dan Daniel wrote:
    > >
    > > The problem with putting on a new chain is that the rest of the drive train is probably so worn
    > > that nothing will work with the new chain.
    > >
    > > The chainwheels are probably older Campy circle size- 144mm? I have a Bianchi from this time
    > > period, and the cranks are labeled 'Bianchi' but are Ofmega copies of Campy. These could be the
    > > most expensive part of the rebuild. 41 or 42 teeth is the smallest that will fit. A new crank
    > > set could be the cleanest way to deal with this.
    > >
    > > Freewheels are available, six speeds. Be careful about putting a seven speed on- I couldn't get
    > > one to fit my Bianchi.
    > >
    > > If indexing isn't an issue, any derailleur will work. Just check the maximum rear sprocket it
    > > will handle.
    > >
    > > And find another bike shop. The one you talked to is NOT the one to help you with this.
    >----------------------------------------
    >>> On Fri, 06 Jun 2003 00:03:32 GMT, "KBH" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>> Hogwash. Any 7/8 speed chain will work fine. SRAM PC-48 is $10-$15. You could change that 42 to
    >>> a 39 (or 38 if its 130 BCD) for a little help.
    >
    >---------------------------
    >>>>"Jerry C." <[email protected]> wrote in ORIGINAL message
    >>>>
    >>>>I have a Bianchi circa 1987/1988. It is in good condition save for the chain, which has never
    >>>>been replaced. My local bike shop told me that they couldn't replace the chain and it would be
    >>>>cost prohibitive to replace the other related component: rear 6 speed cassette, front dbl
    >>>>chainring. I have two questions:
    >>>>
    >>>>1) Can an appropriate chain be found to replace mine?
    >>>>2) Can more gears be economically added for climbing hills? (new rear derailleur and new rear
    >>>> cassette??)
    >>>>
    >>>>Components of my bike: front double chainring - Bianchi 42/52 rear 6 speed cassette - Suntour
    >>>>Winner Pro BJ 13/24 front derailleur - Campy Nuovo Record ??? rear derailleur - Campy Nuovo
    >>>>Record
    >>>>
    >>>>Any feedback would be much appreciated.
    >>>>
    >>>>Jerry Cipriano
     
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