Replacement Chain?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Terranova, Feb 10, 2008.

  1. Terranova

    Terranova New Member

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    Hi, I ride a Trek 1500 '07 on 10speed Ultegra. I broke the chain this morning and am unsure what to replace it with. I bought the bike last year and I have only done 2000 kms on the bike and it was the original chain. Is that the normal life of a chain? Can I just replace the links or should I replace the complete chain?
    IF so what type of chain should I replace it with?
    BTW its my first bike so new to the sport. I don't race and plan to ride a few randonees this year. Cheers.
     
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  2. sogood

    sogood New Member

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    All about chains.

    http://sheldonbrown.com/chains.html

    2000km sounded pretty short for the life of a chain. Did you look after that chain during its life time? Wipe down after rides, degrease/re-lube etc.

    Replace with any 10 speed compatible chain but quality, price, performance and weight can all vary. There's no point getting an expensive chain but not look after it.
     
  3. Peter@vecchios

    [email protected] New Member

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    Measure the old chain, 12 links. If it is more than 12 1/16 inch, worn out and cogs 'may' be worn out as well.

    105 10s level chain with a Wipperman snap link is what I recommend.

    Do not replace links only on this chain.

    Use the least expensive compatible stuff is a good rule of thumb.
     
  4. li rider

    li rider New Member

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    I have '05 Trek 1500, 9 gears in the rear cog. chain also broke at about the same distance. everyone was surprised at its short life.
    I would just replace the entire chain with a new Shimano chain.


     
  5. Terranova

    Terranova New Member

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    No, I probably didn't look after it like I should have. I can only remember degreasing on 3/4 occassion but used lube very often. A friend recommended an SRAM chain so that I could replace the links etc. but maybe I would be better just replacing with a similiar type or even cheaper. I am just wondering now will I need a new cassette also. Might be best bringing it down to the LBS where I bought it.
     
  6. Peter@vecchios

    [email protected] New Member

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    No chain today is made with a pushout/pushin pin design. All need either a special pin or a connecting link, including Sram chains. So, you can replace links as long as you use a connecting link to hook the chain together.
     
  7. sogood

    sogood New Member

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    Given how rare it is to damage chains in an accident for a road bike, I can't think of any good reason for just replacing a few links under regular usage. The only situation where that might happen is if one wants to change the drivetrain setup and needs a longer or shorter chain. If it's from a wear point of view, replacing the whole chain is the way to go.

    I suspect things can be a little different for MTBs where chains break and gets smashed on rocks with some regularity.
     
  8. OldGoat

    OldGoat New Member

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    If your chain has only one damaged link, you may be able to remove it and insert a Wippermann Connex link. Otherwise, I'd get myself a new Shimano chain and a Wippermann link. You will need a chain tool to install the new chain; they're easy to use, and you can buy one for what you'd pay the bike shop to do the job. You will probably need to remove several links from the new chain to adjust it's length to match your existing (broken) chain. If you use a Connex link, you will be able to remove and reinstall the chain easily without tools for cleaning. Whatever you do, do NOT remove the special lube that the new chain will be covered with; it's better lube than anything you could buy. Note that the Connex link is an "outer" link, so if you use one, you'll have to trim the chain to have "inner" links at both ends. (The SRAM link functions similarly to the Connex, but requires a pair of pliers for chain removal; I prefer the Connex; others will disagree.) It is important when installing a Connex link to install it properly; there is a right way and a wrong way. Read the directions; otherwise, it will skip on the small rear cog. The little hole should make a frown when below the crank/cogset (when traveling from the crank to the rear der), and a smile when above (i.e., when traveling from the rear der toward the crank).
     
  9. scirocco

    scirocco New Member

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    +1 on the Connex link. Once you've used them you'd never go back to pushing pins in and out. So easy to take the chain off for cleaning.

    Terranova, out of interest, how did the chain break? Was it under load? Are you very heavy/strong? Was it just one link that was damaged, or do others look suspect as well?
     
  10. Terranova

    Terranova New Member

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    Hi, yeah the chain broke under load, I was accelarating out of the saddle uphill from a virtual standstill. Also I am 14.5 stone (approx 200 lbs) with alot of years of field sports under my belt so I would probably have strong legs also. Just one link was damaged. I brought it down to the LBS and they replaced the link. Only one gone. Hope I don't end up doing damage to my manhood if it doesn't hold.....:eek:
     
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