replacement cleats and carbon soles

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Bikeridindude, Jun 6, 2008.

  1. Bikeridindude

    Bikeridindude New Member

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    I have SIDI shoes and LOOK KEO pedals, and when I originally put the cleats on the shoes last year they had a piece of sandpaper with sticky-tape on the reverse side to stick to the bottom of the cleat. It keeps them in place on the carbon soles.

    It's time to replace the cleats, but they didn't come with the sandpapery stuff, where the heck do I get it? They slide all over the place without it. Thanks.
     
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  2. Camilo

    Camilo New Member

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    I'm not familiar with the actual material that you used before, but could you duplicate it with something like stick-backed emory paper or something similar attached with spray adhesive (rubber cement?) or double sided tape?
     
  3. scirocco

    scirocco New Member

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    Or get some of the gritty carbon grease that carbon components are usually assembled with. If you already have a carbon seatpost in a carbon frame, there is probably some excess on the seatpost that you could get as easily as pulling the post off and wiping it off.
     
  4. Bikeridindude

    Bikeridindude New Member

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    Thanks for the suggestions, I'll give the 2-sided sticky tape idea a try. Doesn't anybody else have this problem?
     
  5. graf zeppelin

    graf zeppelin New Member

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    I dont, and I have the same shoe and cleats. Never did any sandpapering to either sole or cleat, nor have I ever used a medium such as doublestick tape or somesuch between them. When I install new cleats, I simply bear down on the screws with significant torque, but not to the point of completely overdoing it.

    I always have the Swiss Army type tool thing with me on a ride just after cleat installation because they used to shift a little sometimes on the first dismount. I remember this was more often on a new sole, but my current SIDIs are nearing where I might replace them and maybe now have the equivalent of a little roughing of the surface built in. In any event, after this first ride, they always set right in and stayed there very solid. Never had a problem afterwards.

    Maybe try a little roughing up of the cleat surface itself wear it contacts the sole. You could use a very fine sandpaper and a really light touch. I'm honestly not sure you'd need anything more than that. If you have a home trainer, which is where I now test them after install, just get in and out a few times and then double check the positioning. Once they shift once and you fix them and tighten them back down they never again move for me.

    Good luck!
     
  6. DirtTurtle

    DirtTurtle New Member

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    The sandpaper itself isnt for 'sanding' the sole, its a piece of sandpaper that sticks to the cleat, so it has something grippier than plastic to create friction between the sole. Worked a treat for me no slippage, but found the actual sticker moved on the cleat during wet weather.

    I could maybe suggest simply putting thick sandpaper under the cleat, folding it over to make it thicker and if its clamped tight it should hold in place, and also create better friction.

    My shoes are only on their end of the first set of cleats so i might try new cleats without it and see if they hold first.
     
  7. bdaghisallo

    bdaghisallo New Member

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    What you want is some of the 3M non-slip tape. It comes in widths up the four inches and you can trace the cleat outline on it and cut it and stick it on. It is basically like sandpaper with adhesive on the back, but it's more robust than that. You should be able to get it at any hardware store.
     
  8. DirtTurtle

    DirtTurtle New Member

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    I seriously say thanks im 90% sure the actual stuff for the cleat was 3m brand. Thats simply all you need, so that it isnt plastic on carbon which isnt very grippy. A roll of 4inch wide tape would last a lifetime
     
  9. Camilo

    Camilo New Member

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    Also available in boat shops - often by the foot in various widths as narrow as an inch. Used for grip treads on boat gunnels, trailer fenders, etc.
     
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