replacing a quill-type stem on a Schwinn Le Tour (1998)

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Matt Hoyle, Jul 25, 2004.

  1. Matt Hoyle

    Matt Hoyle Guest

    Greetings,

    I've come to the realization that the stem on my 1998 Schwinn Le Tour is
    too long for me, so I'm interested in replacing it. Am I correct in
    thinking I need to purchase both a new stem and headset? Or is there
    something else I need, too?

    I'm new to bike repair, but I like to think I'm fairly good with tools.

    Thanks for reading.

    Matt Hoyle
     
    Tags:


  2. Matt Hoyle wrote:
    > Greetings,
    >
    > I've come to the realization that the stem on my 1998 Schwinn Le Tour is
    > too long for me, so I'm interested in replacing it. Am I correct in
    > thinking I need to purchase both a new stem and headset? Or is there
    > something else I need, too?
    >
    > I'm new to bike repair, but I like to think I'm fairly good with tools.
    >
    > Thanks for reading.
    >
    > Matt Hoyle


    Stem, and probably new handlebar tape. Headset isn't involved.
     
  3. Richard Chan

    Richard Chan Guest

    Matt Hoyle <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Greetings,
    >
    > I've come to the realization that the stem on my 1998 Schwinn Le Tour is
    > too long for me, so I'm interested in replacing it. Am I correct in
    > thinking I need to purchase both a new stem and headset? Or is there
    > something else I need, too?


    Before going with a shorter stem (time and expense), have you tried
    moving your saddle forward a bit (or even lowering it)? Unless you are
    perfectly "tuned" to your riding position, little adjustments and lots
    of miles will toughen you up. Also, getting narrower handlebars will
    effectively shorten your stem length.
     
  4. Matt Hoyle

    Matt Hoyle Guest

    Richard Chan wrote:

    > Matt Hoyle <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    >>Greetings,
    >>
    >>I've come to the realization that the stem on my 1998 Schwinn Le Tour is
    >>too long for me, so I'm interested in replacing it. Am I correct in
    >>thinking I need to purchase both a new stem and headset? Or is there
    >>something else I need, too?

    >
    >
    > Before going with a shorter stem (time and expense), have you tried
    > moving your saddle forward a bit (or even lowering it)? Unless you are
    > perfectly "tuned" to your riding position, little adjustments and lots
    > of miles will toughen you up. Also, getting narrower handlebars will
    > effectively shorten your stem length.


    Thanks for the replies, Richard and David.

    And I haven't tried moving my seat forward. I've always felt like it
    (the stem) was a little short, ever since I first purchased the bike.
    (I'm using the rule-of-thumb that says, for a properly-fit bike, the
    front hub should be obscured by the handlebars when my hands are on the
    hoods. As things are now, I can see the hub easily. It looks like the
    stem is about 1 to 1.5 inches too long.)

    Thanks again,
    Matt
     
  5. Art Harris

    Art Harris Guest

    Matt Hoyle wrote:
    > I've always felt like it
    > (the stem) was a little short, ever since I first purchased the bike.
    > (I'm using the rule-of-thumb that says, for a properly-fit bike, the
    > front hub should be obscured by the handlebars when my hands are on the
    > hoods. As things are now, I can see the hub easily. It looks like the
    > stem is about 1 to 1.5 inches too long.)


    That "rule of thumb" is an old wive's tale. Differences in frame
    geometry as well as the difference between the height of the saddle
    and handlbar will skew the results using that method.

    If you feel comfortable (not cramped/not too stretched out) don't mess
    with the stem length. If you're not comfortable, you may need to
    experiment with stem height as well as length. But the final result
    will depend on comfort and your riding style, not some formula.

    You certainly shouldn't change your saddle position to compensate for
    an improper stem length.

    Art Harris
     
  6. Richard Chan

    Richard Chan Guest

    Matt Hoyle <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > And I haven't tried moving my seat forward. I've always felt like it
    > (the stem) was a little short, ever since I first purchased the bike.
    > (I'm using the rule-of-thumb that says, for a properly-fit bike, the
    > front hub should be obscured by the handlebars when my hands are on the
    > hoods. As things are now, I can see the hub easily. It looks like the
    > stem is about 1 to 1.5 inches too long.)


    The rule of thumb or the flavor of the day ... it is good as a
    starting point for fit but not obsolute .. The fit formula varies
    depending on your fitness level and body shape. I am about 5' 9" and
    ride a 12/13 cm stem with a 54.5+ toptube.

    The reason I suggest what I suggest is I wouldn't invest any more
    money into the bike unless it is for consumables (chains, cogs, tires,
    tuneups, ..) or if something is broken.
     
  7. Gonzo Bob

    Gonzo Bob New Member

    Joined:
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    A shorter stem may be called for. But 1-1.5 inches is quite a bit. Before you get a stem that much shorter, make sure you will have knee clearance when you stand to climb. Nothin' worse than bangin' your knee on the back of the handlebars.
     
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