replacing forks...

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by ~MoDCoN~, Apr 30, 2003.

  1. ~MoDCoN~

    ~MoDCoN~ New Member

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    hello all. i just wanted to ask whether replacing forks is hard to do. so, are they? cos i am looking at maybe getting a bike with dodgy forks, and feel i should replace them as soon as.
    any clues???

    thanks
    MoD
     
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  2. xavier

    xavier New Member

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    They are pretty easy to replace if you have a few tools. Only hard part may be if you are reusing you headset you will need to pry the crown race off the old fork and install on a new fork.

    You will need a tool to slam in the new race. If cartridge bearings then many brands out there are split thus no need to slam them in. This is very good.

    After this all you will need to do is measure, measure, measure and then do a 'dry' install and then mark and cut.

    For threaded is same process. When cutting it is best to leave part of the headset screwed in so when you cut you can chase the threads with the headset piece you left screwed in. This makes life much easier.
     
  3. J-MAT

    J-MAT New Member

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    Riders who put in regular miles should inspect their forks periodically, regardless if you race, tour, or ride for fun. The more miles/hours you put in, the sooner you should inspect them.

    To inspect the fork properly, you must remove the fork from the bike and carefully look at the steerer tube and dropouts. Obviously, you can check the dropouts with the fork installed, but you can't check the steerer tube.

    Years ago, I was mountain biking with some friends and we hit a fast downhill section. At around 38 mph, I suddenly lost control of my steering. The bike didn't respond to handlebar input. I had just broken the steerer tube and didn't know it yet!!! Somehow, I managed to stay on the bike, slowing to 15 mph before I flew over the bars in and crashed into a ditch.

    Carbon steerer tubes are the most suspect these days. Carbon fiber is extremely strong, but Cracks can develop from the etching of headset parts into the carbon steerer. Aluminum and steel are very reliable. So is carbon if parts are properly installed.

    All forks need to be checked periodically.

    To inspect, clean the fork if necessary, then closely check for any cracks or faint lines known as "stress risers" These are the beginning of cracks and will eventually cause failure if left unchecked. Use a magnifying glass if you need to. Sometimes, stress risers can be ground or polished away. Be sure you know what you are doing if you try to get rid of stress risers!!!

    How often should you check? In an ideal world, that would be before every ride, but that is not pratical in the real world. Perhaps twice a year/season, maybe more if you are strong and doing lots of sprints, races, or big miles.

    All high stress bike parts must be periodically inspected. Sometimes it requires removal of the part for a proper inspection.

    pedals, cranks, seat rails, seatposts, handlebars, stems, frame bottom brackets, pedal spindles, fork and frame dropouts, wheels, tire sidewalls, and all frame joints and welds should be inspected before every ride.

    Good luck!!!
     
  4. Reynoldsouzopro

    Reynoldsouzopro New Member

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    Hi I am interested in the exact area that the steerer tube broke.
    Was is at the stem?
    Within the head tube?, (between the bearings)
    Or, at the crown area?
    Thanks
     
  5. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    That post was 2 years old. Don't hold you breath waiting for an answer.
     
  6. Fat Hack

    Fat Hack New Member

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    Send him a private message or an email
     
  7. dhk

    dhk New Member

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    Believe your suggested inspection schedule is way beyond what's needed, at least for a road bike under normal conditions.

    Removing a CF fork to inspect the steer tube twice a year could induce more problems than it avoids. If the stem is fit properly to a quality fork, I don't see why the CF steer tube should ever fail in normal road riding, barring a crash or other abuse. I'm a risk-avoidance type, but I don't plan to ever remove my stem and fork just to look for stress-riser cracks.

    If a fork manufacturer said I had to remove and inspect his fork steer tube to exact procedures on a mileage or time schedule to keep safe, I'd buy a different fork.

    As far as inspecting the entire bike before every ride, that's just way too time-consuming, and again unnecessary in my experience. Unlike aircraft, we can generally hear and feel what's going on with our bikes long before a failure occurs. Believe if a rider pays reasonable attention to noises and problems, we can just ride these machines without worries.
     
  8. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    Right on.I suspect the failure mentioned originally was most likely due to operator error.
     
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