Replacing old 27 inch rims with 700c?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Chris Hansen, Jan 24, 2004.

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  1. Chris Hansen

    Chris Hansen Guest

    Hello,

    I recently adopted an old road bike from an extended family member. It's maybe 15 years old and has
    27 inch rims and I was wondering how much support is still available for that size rim and if it
    would be possible to use 700c rims on it?

    Thanks.
     
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  2. Mike Kruger

    Mike Kruger Guest

    "Chris Hansen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hello,
    >
    > I recently adopted an old road bike from an extended family member. It's maybe 15 years old and
    > has 27 inch rims and I was wondering how much support is still available for that size rim and if
    > it would be possible to use 700c rims on it?
    >
    There have been an number of threads on the 27->700 topic; either go to Google or wait around for a
    bit for somebody's experience. My commuting road bike is a 27 inch, and I see no compelling reason
    for ME to change.

    There's less 27 inch stuff, but there's no real shortage. You can get replacement rims - a very good
    idea if your inherited bike has steel rims, but a 15 year old bike probably has aluminum rims. You
    can get tires, both *mart cheapies and decent tires like Continental Top Touring tires (if you can't
    find good 27 inch tires at your LBS): http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/tires/630.html
     
  3. S. Anderson

    S. Anderson Guest

    "Chris Hansen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hello,
    >
    > I recently adopted an old road bike from an extended family member. It's maybe 15 years old and
    > has 27 inch rims and I was wondering how much support is still available for that size rim and if
    > it would be possible to use 700c rims on it?
    >
    > Thanks.

    The conversion can be a bit tricky. The big problem is brake reach. Some frame and brake combos can
    accomodate the brake drop, some can't. There are drop bolts available for certain brakes that would
    give you that extra 1" or so of drop but I don't know if they're still made. If your brake bridge
    and fork crown are very close to the tire, you might be ok. If they're a mile away, like most cheap
    bikes, you'll probably be out of luck. As Mike said, I don't know there's much reason to change
    apart from trying to keep all your bikes the same. There is a bit of a problem getting good quality
    27" stuff these days, but since you inherited the bike, I'm not sure this is a big deal.

    Cheers,

    Scott..
     
  4. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> writes:
    > On Sat, 24 Jan 2004 22:01:26 -0500, S. Anderson wrote:
    >
    >> The conversion can be a bit tricky. The big problem is brake reach. Some frame and brake combos
    >> can accomodate the brake drop, some can't.
    >
    > True. Many older bikes were actually designed for both, since the maker assumed that they'd be
    > used with either tubulars (same size as 700c) or clincher (only 27").
    >
    > There are
    >> drop bolts available for certain brakes that would give you that extra 1" or so of drop but I
    >> don't know if they're still made.
    >
    > They are still made, but we are not talking about 1". It's a 4mm difference.

    I've heard several accounts from ppl who've ordered longer reach brakes from sources such as Harris
    Cyclery, in the course of their 27" -> 700C upgrades. I suppose Weinmann doesn't have the same
    cachet as other, more up-market brands. But apparently they work well enough.

    Speaking of Weinmann, they seem to still distribute 27" ready-built wheels. I bought a brand new one
    a couple of years ago, anyway. Good enough for a city runabout. I wouldn't do a loaded tour in
    Iceland with it, though.

    I've got a sh*t-load of 70's Shimano brakes of various reaches, and they're all actually pretty damn
    good for what they are. Especially the centre-pulls, which are really quite beefy and non-flexy.

    If one really wants to go nutz about brakes, there are all kinds of disc brake conversion sets
    available. A google search readily reveals many sources.

    I'd rather seek out brakes -- any good brakes that fit nicely, and go for the drop bolt kludge as a
    last, desparate resort.

    A note in passing: the old, chromed-steel rims aren't as evil as many would have us believe. They do
    have their limitations, but they have some advantages, too. With the right brake pads, their slippery-when-
    wetness can be obviated to an extent -- not as good as aluminum alloy, but not totally,
    flounderingly useless, either.

    cheers, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    [point] bc [point] ca
     
  5. S. Anderson

    S. Anderson Guest

    "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    >
    > They are still made, but we are not talking about 1". It's a 4mm difference.
    >
    That's the difference in the rim radius. The drop bolts actually dropped about a 1/2" or so, at
    least the ones I've seen did.

    Cheers,

    Scott..
     
  6. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Hello,
    >
    > I recently adopted an old road bike from an extended family member. It's maybe 15 years old and
    > has 27 inch rims and I was wondering how much support is still available for that size rim and if
    > it would be possible to use 700c rims on it?

    Whether you can use 700c rims depends on your brakes; if there is enough adjustibility in the pad
    location you will be able to (you need to move the pads about 4mm toward the axle).

    It's really unnecessary unless you just want to standardize everything; I've had no trouble finding
    good tires and tubes for my 27" Schwinn LeTour, both mail-order and at the LBS.

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Tom Keats) wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, "David L. Johnson"
    > <[email protected]> writes:
    > > On Sat, 24 Jan 2004 22:01:26 -0500, S. Anderson wrote:
    > >
    > >> The conversion can be a bit tricky. The big problem is brake reach. Some frame and brake combos
    > >> can accomodate the brake drop, some can't.
    > >
    > > True. Many older bikes were actually designed for both, since the maker assumed that they'd be
    > > used with either tubulars (same size as 700c) or clincher (only 27").
    > >
    > > There are
    > >> drop bolts available for certain brakes that would give you that extra 1" or so of drop but I
    > >> don't know if they're still made.
    > >
    > > They are still made, but we are not talking about 1". It's a 4mm difference.
    >
    > I've heard several accounts from ppl who've ordered longer reach brakes from sources such as
    > Harris Cyclery, in the course of their 27" -> 700C upgrades. I suppose Weinmann doesn't have the
    > same cachet as other, more up-market brands. But apparently they work well enough.
    >
    > Speaking of Weinmann, they seem to still distribute 27" ready-built wheels. I bought a brand new
    > one a couple of years ago, anyway. Good enough for a city runabout. I wouldn't do a loaded tour in
    > Iceland with it, though.

    In late 2002 I bought a ready-built 27" rear from the Bike Doctor. I believe the cost was about $40.
    The tires and tubes should still be easilly available: MEC has them as a normal-stock item.

    The wheel I got was not a Weinmann, but some odd Taiwanese brand. No matter, it works.

    > I've got a sh*t-load of 70's Shimano brakes of various reaches, and they're all actually
    > pretty damn good for what they are. Especially the centre-pulls, which are really quite beefy
    > and non-flexy.
    >
    > If one really wants to go nutz about brakes, there are all kinds of disc brake conversion sets
    > available. A google search readily reveals many sources.
    >
    > I'd rather seek out brakes -- any good brakes that fit nicely, and go for the drop bolt kludge as
    > a last, desparate resort.

    Modern dual-pivot brakes and SLR-type levers make a difference. I was shocked at how much difference
    when I upgraded my Bianchi from a crappy Dia-Compe brake to an almost-contemporary RSX dual-pivot
    with matching SLR lever (different pivot point, much easier to pull from the hoods, and a return
    spring in the lever body). I did an interesting conversion:

    To make the 700c wheel go from its old standard-reach brake to the new short-reach brake, we
    replaced the fork with a 27" fork designed for short-reach brakes (had to drill the crown for the
    recessed brake mounting), and then I added spherical washer hardware from some used-up V-brake pads
    to angle the new pads down the few extra mm needed to squarely hit the rim.

    > A note in passing: the old, chromed-steel rims aren't as evil as many would have us believe. They
    > do have their limitations, but they have some advantages, too. With the right brake pads, their
    > slippery-when-wetness can be obviated to an extent -- not as good as aluminum alloy, but not
    > totally, flounderingly useless, either.

    I'll let you be the judge of that. The easy availability of lighter, better-stopping aluminum rims
    obviates any need to use steel rims.

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  8. Chris Hansen

    Chris Hansen Guest

    > I've had no trouble finding good tires and tubes for my 27" Schwinn LeTour, both mail-order and at
    > the LBS.

    That's the same model bike I adopted and I don't know anything about it except that it seems to be
    the right size. Can you tell me anything about it or point me in the right direction?

    Thanks.
     
  9. Bruce Lange

    Bruce Lange Guest

    Hi Chris,

    It was around for many years. Check this awesome Schwinn lightweight site:

    http://www.geocities.com/sldatabook/detail7074.html#1970

    and scroll to the bottom for the 1975-1978 link. You should be able to find it on there somewhere.

    Bruce Lange

    <"Chris Hansen" >

    > That's the same model bike I adopted and I don't know anything about it except that it seems to be
    > the right size. Can you tell me anything about it or point me in the right direction?
    >
    > Thanks.
     
  10. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > > I've had no trouble finding good tires and tubes for my 27" Schwinn LeTour, both mail-order and
    > > at the LBS.
    >
    > That's the same model bike I adopted and I don't know anything about it except that it seems to be
    > the right size. Can you tell me anything about it or point me in the right direction?

    What direction do you need to go <GGG>? If your LBS doesn't have 27" tires and tubes (mine does),
    then hit one of the mail-order or internet parts places; they do. I got a set of Conti T-1000 Sport
    from my LBS for both my new bike (700c) and the LeTour (27") and I really like them.

    If you really want to replace the wheels with 700c ones, it will probably work fine once you move
    the brake pads 4mm or so, but if what you have is in good shape, I'd just put new tires and tubes on
    it and ride it as is.

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
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