Replacing thread bolt assembly in sole of shoe

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by moondog321, Aug 20, 2013.

  1. moondog321

    moondog321 New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2013
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Anybody have any experience in replacing the thread bolt assembly, that the cleat bolts screw into, in sole of shoe? Lake sent me a replacement part, but no instructions except check out YouTube, which I did with no joy.
     
    Tags:


  2. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2005
    Messages:
    6,723
    Likes Received:
    126
    What does it look like?

    Is it a "plate" with threaded receiving holes OR is it an individual boss of some sort?
     
  3. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2004
    Messages:
    12,596
    Likes Received:
    160
    Can you post a picture of what they sent?
     
  4. moondog321

    moondog321 New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2013
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Here's what they sent:
    [​IMG]

    Here's what was in there:
    [​IMG]
    Looks like a weird nut (boss?) of some kind.
    Contacted Lake and they are sending me these.
    Thanks for the replies.
     
  5. daveryanwyoming

    daveryanwyoming Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2006
    Messages:
    3,857
    Likes Received:
    97
    Yeah, those are basically T-bolt assemblies, usually made out of stamped steel in cycling shoes. The replacement they sent you is an assembly for a standard 3 bolt Look style road cleat. You can try to get the correct single T-bolt (which you can often find at a well stocked hardware store) or you can snip off one of the end pieces of what they sent you and use it as a replacement as long as the bolt threading is the same and the bit of flange around the snipped off end is large enough to span the hole in the shoe so the T-bolt doesn't pull through the sole.

    I've replaced several stripped T-bolts over the years in cycling shoes and there are a lot of solutions as long as you can find a low profile T-bolt with the threading you need.

    -Dave

     
  6. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2005
    Messages:
    11,945
    Likes Received:
    1,037
    Once you get the correct T-nut, Remove the insole. It may be loose or glued down to the foot bed, but careful and slow work will get it out in one piece...usually. Dr. Scholls replacement insoles will work as replacements if you destroy the Lake insole.

    When the insole is removed, you'll see the footbed material. This can be leather, fake leather, cardboard, polymer or dried oatmeal. You will have to use an knife to cut away or split the footbed over the T-nut recess in the sole. Often, foot pressure will have made an outline of the recess in the footbed thru the insole and it's easy to locate. Sometimes you just have to guess and cut oversize.

    Once the recess is exposed, drop in the T-nut and re-glue the footbed in place. Get it smooth. Replace the insole and glue it down. Rubber cement or contact cement will work.
     
  7. daveryanwyoming

    daveryanwyoming Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2006
    Messages:
    3,857
    Likes Received:
    97
    Ahhhh yeah, senior moment on my part, these things are T-nuts, not T-bolts as I called them above.....
     
  8. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2005
    Messages:
    11,945
    Likes Received:
    1,037
    There are T-nuts, D-nuts, Double D-nuts and a variety of other specialized fasteners. T-bolt...no big deal. You were on the right track. As long as the replacement item does not rotate in the recess and not cause a raise spot under the foot bed...it's all good.

    I've seen aluminum, soft steel and hardened steel shoe inserts; 3-piece inserts (individual) and 1-piece styles (as was sent to the OP). And I've siliconed those weird Time 'extra' inserts in place to keep them from rattling loose/unused in the soles.

    For slotted head screws used to secure cleats, the best tool I've found is one of those cheap, square wood handled stubby screw drivers. They (at least for me) offer more control when engaged in the fastener as opposed to a longer shank screw driver and make sneaking up on the ultimate torque more easily felt. Less fastener damage and fewer stripped shoe inserts.

    I hate replacing well worn (read: FINALLY comfy!) shoes or even going to my backup shoes unless I'm completely out of repair ideas. Playing amateur cobbler was mandatory back in the days of nailed-on cleats and crappy Italian shoe leather and cheap glue (probably the same crap they sold us to glue tires on with).
     
  9. moondog321

    moondog321 New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2013
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for all the input guys. Very helpful.
     
Loading...
Loading...