Replacing tires, size question



J

Jazu

Guest
HI I need to replace stock tires. Original stock size is 26
X 1.95. What flexibility do I have with new tires size? Do I
have to put exactly the same size? I'm thinking to put
Continental Town and Country which apparently are little
bigger.(is that a good choice?) thanks jazu
 
S

S O R N I

Guest
jazu wrote:
> HI I need to replace stock tires. Original stock size is
> 26 X 1.95. What flexibility do I have with new tires size?
> Do I have to put exactly the same size?

Only the '26' has to remain the same. The 1.95 can go either
way, as long as the new tire will clear the chain- and seat-
stays. (2.3 or 2.4 probably the limit wide-wise.)

> I'm thinking to put Continental Town and Country which
> apparently are little bigger.(is that a good choice?)

Sound like slicks -- you sure they're bigger?

No way to say whether they're a good choice without knowing
your riding style and habits. What kind of terrain are we
talking about here?

Bill "horses for courses" S.
 
J

Jazu

Guest
> No way to say whether they're a good choice without
> knowing your riding style and habits. What kind of terrain
> are we talking about here?
Mostly pavement and some trail in the park, you know some
stones, tree roots. Mountain bike, but no mountains
involved:)
 
S

S O R N I

Guest
jazu wrote:
>> No way to say whether they're a good choice without
>> knowing your riding style and habits. What kind of
>> terrain are we talking about here?
> Mostly pavement and some trail in the park, you know some
> stones, tree roots. Mountain bike, but no mountains
> involved:)

Semi-slicks or maybe something "small-knobbied" then,
depending on how much of what you do.

Bill "vague-ish" S.
 
W

Westie

Guest
jazu wrote:
>> No way to say whether they're a good choice without
>> knowing your riding style and habits. What kind of
>> terrain are we talking about here?
> Mostly pavement and some trail in the park, you know some
> stones, tree roots.

You'll probably have a difficult time finding something that
will do both pavement and tree roots well, especially if the
tree roots regularly get wet. The Continental Twisters might
do the job. I've been pleased with them in the past.
--
Westie (Replace 'invalid' with 'yahoo' when replying.)