Report on Alton Brown's City Ham

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Nexis, Dec 26, 2005.

  1. Nexis

    Nexis Guest

    Let me preface this post by saying, I am *not* a ham eater. Never have liked
    it, except covered in bbq sauce and served on a potato roll. That being
    said, this ham turned out awesome! lol

    Here's the basics: You buy a brined ham, hock end. Score the skin spiraling
    one way, then the other so it comes out like diamonds. Tent foil over and
    bake at 250*f for 3-4 hours. Then you peel off the skin and whatever fat
    comes with it, which turned out to be alot. Most in fact. Then you brush the
    whole thing with spicy brown mustard, and pat on first dark brown sugar,
    then crushed gingersnaps. Put it back in the oven, raising the heat to
    350*f, for 1 hour. It was a hit, to be sure. I had only about 4 slices left
    once the dishes were cleared! Everyone was talking about the way the spicy
    mustard cut the sweetness without obliterating it...nice balance.
    So, if you like ham, I can recommend this recipe without hesitation.

    kimberly
     
    Tags:


  2. Goomba38

    Goomba38 Guest

    Nexis wrote:
    > Let me preface this post by saying, I am *not* a ham eater. Never have liked
    > it, except covered in bbq sauce and served on a potato roll. That being
    > said, this ham turned out awesome! lol


    I made and wrote about this a year or more ago!! It IS wonderful, isn't
    it!? Yea, Alton!!!!!
    Goomba
     
  3. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Nexis wrote:
    > Let me preface this post by saying, I am *not* a ham eater. Never have liked
    > it, except covered in bbq sauce and served on a potato roll. That being
    > said, this ham turned out awesome! lol
    >
    > Here's the basics: You buy a brined ham, hock end.


    Hock... that ain't any kind of ham... ham is whole, butt, or shank...
    ain't no other. And what do you mean brined... then sure can't be
    cured, must be talking fresh pork.
     
  4. Goomba38

    Goomba38 Guest

    Sheldon wrote:

    > Nexis wrote:
    >
    >>Let me preface this post by saying, I am *not* a ham eater. Never have liked
    >>it, except covered in bbq sauce and served on a potato roll. That being
    >>said, this ham turned out awesome! lol
    >>
    >>Here's the basics: You buy a brined ham, hock end.

    >
    >
    > Hock... that ain't any kind of ham... ham is whole, butt, or shank...
    > ain't no other. And what do you mean brined... then sure can't be
    > cured, must be talking fresh pork.
    >

    This is from the recipe on the FoodTV site: *Cook's note: A city ham is
    basically any brined ham that's packed in a plastic bag, held in a
    refrigerated case and marked "ready to cook", "partially cooked" or
    "ready to serve". Better city hams are also labeled "ham in natural juices"
    "
     
  5. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Steve Wertz wrote:
    >"Sheldon" wrote:
    >
    > > And what do you mean brined... then sure can't be cured, must be talking fresh pork.

    >
    > Duh - Brining is the method used to cure the ham.


    No it's not. Brining means to soak in salted water, that is NOT
    curing.

    You got cured ham confused with pickled beets. DUH!
     
  6. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Goomba38 wrote:
    > Sheldon wrote:
    >
    > > Nexis wrote:
    > >
    > >>Let me preface this post by saying, I am *not* a ham eater. Never have liked
    > >>it, except covered in bbq sauce and served on a potato roll. That being
    > >>said, this ham turned out awesome! lol
    > >>
    > >>Here's the basics: You buy a brined ham, hock end.

    > >
    > >
    > > Hock... that ain't any kind of ham... ham is whole, butt, or shank...
    > > ain't no other. And what do you mean brined... then sure can't be
    > > cured, must be talking fresh pork.
    > >

    > This is from the recipe on the FoodTV site: *Cook's note: A city ham is
    > basically any brined ham that's packed in a plastic bag, held in a
    > refrigerated case and marked "ready to cook", "partially cooked" or
    > "ready to serve". Better city hams are also labeled "ham in natural juices"


    What are you jabbering about... FoodTV! Ahahahahahahahaha. . . . .

    "Hock" is not ham, and brining is not curing.... do you think when folk
    discuss how to brine a turkey or pork chops it's about preserving...
    you'd best stay far away from FoodTV, your brain is brined. <G>
     
  7. On 26 Dec 2005 18:43:14 -0800, "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Brining means to soak in salted water, that is NOT curing.



    * Exported from MasterCook *

    Honey Cure for Smoked Salmon

    Recipe By :Steven Raichlen
    Serving Size : 0 Preparation Time :0:00
    Categories : brines-rubs-marinades fish-seafood


    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    4 cups cold water
    3/4 cup honey
    1/2 cup coarse salt -- kosher or sea
    4 strips lemon zest
    10 whole cloves
    10 allspice berries
    10 peppercorns
    2 bay leaves, whole

    Combine all the ingredients in a bowl and whisk until the salt and
    honey are dissolved. Use right away.

    Source:
    "Barbecue Bible! Sauces, Rubs and Marinades"
    Yield:
    "4 cups"

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    Serving Ideas : Makes enough for two pounds of seafood, chicken, pork,
    or turkey.

    NOTES :
    Raichlen: This cure was designed for fish, but I wouldn't turn my
    nose up at it for turkey or chicken. Cover and marinate fish steaks
    for 1 to 2 hours, larger fish filets for 2 to 3 hours, and whole fish
    overnight in the refrigerator. Chicken breasts need 2 to 4 hours; a
    whole bird, overnight.
     
  8. Damsel replied to Sheldon:

    >> Brining means to soak in salted water, that is NOT curing.

    >
    >
    > * Exported from MasterCook *
    >
    > Honey Cure for Smoked Salmon
    >
    > Recipe By :Steven Raichlen
    > Serving Size : 0 Preparation Time :0:00
    > Categories : brines-rubs-marinades fish-seafood
    >
    >
    > Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    > -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    > 4 cups cold water
    > 3/4 cup honey
    > 1/2 cup coarse salt -- kosher or sea
    > 4 strips lemon zest
    > 10 whole cloves
    > 10 allspice berries
    > 10 peppercorns
    > 2 bay leaves, whole
    >
    > Combine all the ingredients in a bowl and whisk until the salt and
    > honey are dissolved. Use right away.
    >
    > Source:
    > "Barbecue Bible! Sauces, Rubs and Marinades"
    > Yield:
    > "4 cups"



    What a nice way of telling Sheldon he's full of shit! Of course, I'm sure
    Sheldon will respond that Steve Raichlen is a six-fingered wop whose taste
    is in his ass. That's just the kind of shit-filled moron Sheldon is.

    Bob
     
  9. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    BOOb Twerpwilliger wrote:
    >
    > "Barbecue Bible! Sauces, Rubs and Marinades"
    >
    > What a nice way of telling Sheldon he's full of shit! Of course, I'm sure
    > Sheldon will respond that Steve Raichlen is a six-fingered wop whose taste
    > is in his ass. That's just the kind of shit-filled moron Sheldon is.
    >
    > BOOb


    A marinade is NOT a cure, you dumb eunochs.
     
  10. Reg

    Reg Guest

    Sheldon wrote:

    > BOOb Twerpwilliger wrote:
    >
    >> "Barbecue Bible! Sauces, Rubs and Marinades"
    >>
    >>What a nice way of telling Sheldon he's full of shit! Of course, I'm sure
    >>Sheldon will respond that Steve Raichlen is a six-fingered wop whose taste
    >>is in his ass. That's just the kind of shit-filled moron Sheldon is.
    >>
    >>BOOb

    >
    >
    > A marinade is NOT a cure, you dumb eunochs.
    >


    And a brine is not a marinade. This is a salt/sugar solution, AKA a
    brine. A marinade contains an acid, which this clearly does not.

    --
    Reg email: RegForte (at) (that free MS email service) (dot) com
     
  11. On 26 Dec 2005 21:20:03 -0600, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <[email protected]_spammer.biz> wrote:

    > What a nice way of telling Sheldon he's full of shit!


    That's just the kind of gal I am. :)

    > Of course, I'm sure
    > Sheldon will respond that Steve Raichlen is a six-fingered wop whose taste
    > is in his ass. That's just the kind of shit-filled moron Sheldon is.


    Steve Raichlen? Who is Steve Raichlen? <Damsel blinks innocently>

    BTW, everyone who's ever tasted, "Crash's smoked salmon," loves,
    loves, loves it. Even people who don't like salmon. Like me.

    Carol
     
  12. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On 26 Dec 2005 18:43:14 -0800, "Sheldon" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Steve Wertz wrote:
    >>"Sheldon" wrote:
    >>
    >> > And what do you mean brined... then sure can't be cured, must be talking fresh pork.

    >>
    >> Duh - Brining is the method used to cure the ham.

    >
    >No it's not. Brining means to soak in salted water, that is NOT
    >curing.


    You're right, as always. It's everyone else that's got it all
    wrong.

    Stick to quoting from websites because what you have floating
    around in your widdle head isn't worth squat.

    -sw
     
  13. Goomba38

    Goomba38 Guest

    Sheldon wrote:


    > What are you jabbering about... FoodTV! Ahahahahahahahaha. . . . .
    >
    > "Hock" is not ham, and brining is not curing.... do you think when folk
    > discuss how to brine a turkey or pork chops it's about preserving...
    > you'd best stay far away from FoodTV, your brain is brined. <G>
    >

    I have no idea why the recipe says "brined" but having made the recipe,
    using the ham he described exactly, I can attest to it having tasted
    great!!
    I've not brined my brain yet....but I'll keep working on it :) LOL
    Goomba
     
  14. Sheldon wrote:

    > Goomba38 wrote:
    > > Sheldon wrote:
    > >
    > > > Nexis wrote:
    > > >
    > > >>Let me preface this post by saying, I am *not* a ham eater. Never have

    liked
    > > >>it, except covered in bbq sauce and served on a potato roll. That

    being
    > > >>said, this ham turned out awesome! lol
    > > >>
    > > >>Here's the basics: You buy a brined ham, hock end.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > Hock... that ain't any kind of ham... ham is whole, butt, or shank...
    > > > ain't no other. And what do you mean brined... then sure can't be
    > > > cured, must be talking fresh pork.
    > > >

    > > This is from the recipe on the FoodTV site: *Cook's note: A city ham is
    > > basically any brined ham that's packed in a plastic bag, held in a
    > > refrigerated case and marked "ready to cook", "partially cooked" or
    > > "ready to serve". Better city hams are also labeled "ham in natural

    juices"
    >
    > What are you jabbering about... FoodTV! Ahahahahahahahaha. . . . .
    >
    > "Hock" is not ham, and brining is not curing.... do you think when folk
    > discuss how to brine a turkey or pork chops it's about preserving...
    > you'd best stay far away from FoodTV, your brain is brined. <G>
    >


    And WTF is a "city" ham...???

    Is the "city" Little Rock or NYC or Venezia or *where*...???

    --
    Best
    Greg
     
  15. On Mon 26 Dec 2005 09:47:28p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Gregory
    Morrow?

    >
    > Sheldon wrote:
    >
    >> Goomba38 wrote:
    >> > Sheldon wrote:
    >> >
    >> > > Nexis wrote:
    >> > >
    >> > >>Let me preface this post by saying, I am *not* a ham eater. Never
    >> > >>have liked it, except covered in bbq sauce and served on a potato
    >> > >>roll. That being said, this ham turned out awesome! lol
    >> > >>
    >> > >>Here's the basics: You buy a brined ham, hock end.
    >> > >
    >> > >
    >> > > Hock... that ain't any kind of ham... ham is whole, butt, or
    >> > > shank... ain't no other. And what do you mean brined... then sure
    >> > > can't be cured, must be talking fresh pork.
    >> > >
    >> > This is from the recipe on the FoodTV site: *Cook's note: A city ham
    >> > is basically any brined ham that's packed in a plastic bag, held in a
    >> > refrigerated case and marked "ready to cook", "partially cooked" or
    >> > "ready to serve". Better city hams are also labeled "ham in natural
    >> > juices"

    >>
    >> What are you jabbering about... FoodTV! Ahahahahahahahaha. . . . .
    >>
    >> "Hock" is not ham, and brining is not curing.... do you think when folk
    >> discuss how to brine a turkey or pork chops it's about preserving...
    >> you'd best stay far away from FoodTV, your brain is brined. <G>
    >>

    >
    > And WTF is a "city" ham...???
    >
    > Is the "city" Little Rock or NYC or Venezia or *where*...???
    >


    According to Food Network, "A city ham is basically any brined ham that's
    packed in a plastic bag, held in a refrigerated case and marked 'ready to
    cook'".

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    __________________________________________________________________
    And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.
     
  16. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On 27 Dec 2005 06:00:27 +0100, Wayne Boatwright
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >According to Food Network, "A city ham is basically any brined ham that's
    >packed in a plastic bag, held in a refrigerated case and marked 'ready to
    >cook'".


    It's a "City Ham" (wet cured) as opposed to a "Country Ham"
    (dry-cured).

    Why they didn't just name them Urban Ham and Rural Ham is
    anybody's guess.

    -sw
     
  17. On 27 Dec 2005 06:00:27 +0100, Wayne Boatwright
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > According to Food Network, "A city ham is basically any brined ham that's
    > packed in a plastic bag, held in a refrigerated case and marked 'ready to
    > cook'".


    Brined? BRINED? ;)

    Sorry. Naptime.

    Carol
     
  18. On Mon, 26 Dec 2005 23:13:56 -0600, Steve Wertz
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 27 Dec 2005 06:00:27 +0100, Wayne Boatwright
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >According to Food Network, "A city ham is basically any brined ham that's
    > >packed in a plastic bag, held in a refrigerated case and marked 'ready to
    > >cook'".

    >
    > It's a "City Ham" (wet cured) as opposed to a "Country Ham"
    > (dry-cured).
    >
    > Why they didn't just name them Urban Ham and Rural Ham is
    > anybody's guess.


    One of the great philosphical questions of our time. I have enjoyed
    Smithfield rural hambs, but overall, I like the urban stuff best.

    Carol, just a city, er, suburban gal
     
  19. On Mon 26 Dec 2005 10:13:56p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Steve Wertz?

    > On 27 Dec 2005 06:00:27 +0100, Wayne Boatwright
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>According to Food Network, "A city ham is basically any brined ham that's
    >>packed in a plastic bag, held in a refrigerated case and marked 'ready to
    >>cook'".

    >
    > It's a "City Ham" (wet cured) as opposed to a "Country Ham"
    > (dry-cured).
    >
    > Why they didn't just name them Urban Ham and Rural Ham is
    > anybody's guess.
    >
    > -sw
    >


    Then there must be one that is damp cured called "Suburban Ham".

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    __________________________________________________________________
    And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.
     
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