Request low-carb recipes for diabetes

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by MaryL, Feb 1, 2005.

  1. MaryL

    MaryL Guest

    Can anyone suggest some good (but *easy*) recipes for beef, lamb, pork or
    chicken stew or roasts? -- but the "catch" here is the recipe must not
    include *any* potatoes, flour, rice, pasta, or sugar. I have diabetes, and
    I have found that I can keep my blood glucose levels well under control if I
    completely avoid those items. A single slice of whole wheat bread will send
    my sugar spiking, so the only bread I eat is Ezekiel bread (a flourless
    bread made from sprouted grains -- purchased at a health food store and must
    be kept frozen or refrigerated). Obviously, I get sugar through the fresh
    fruit I eat, but I do not *add* any at all. My diet is not nearly as
    limiting as this sounds -- lots of fresh veggies, fruit, lean meat, eggs,
    etc. plus nuts and low-fat cheese -- but I do not spend a lot of time in the
    kitchen and would like some quick but tasty recipes.

    I am new to this group, and I apologize if this question has previously been
    asked and answered.

    Thanks for the help.
    MaryL
     
    Tags:


  2. -L.

    -L. Guest

    MaryL wrote:
    > Can anyone suggest some good (but *easy*) recipes for beef, lamb,

    pork or
    > chicken stew or roasts? -- but the "catch" here is the recipe must

    not
    > include *any* potatoes, flour, rice, pasta, or sugar.


    I would follow a regular recipe, omit the potatoes and add lots of
    veggies - zuchini, yellow squash, mushrooms, peppers, carrots (if you
    can), celery or celery root - just about anything will work in stew or
    roasts. I often roast a chicken for about an hour, remove from the pan
    to a plate, add a bunch of mixed veggies in the bottom of the pan, and
    place the chicken back into the pan on top of the veggies. Roast for
    an additional 30-45 minutes. I season all with garlic, onion powder,
    and then a saltless spice mix - either one designed for chicken or a
    Mrs. Dash brand. I roast the chicken with some stock or water in the
    bottom of the pan - you may need to add more when you add the veggies.
    I cover it with foil the last 15 minutes or so, sometimes, too.
    Also check out the Sugar Busters diet book - lots of good info.

    -L.
     
  3. MaryL

    MaryL Guest

    "-L." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > MaryL wrote:
    >> Can anyone suggest some good (but *easy*) recipes for beef, lamb,

    > pork or
    >> chicken stew or roasts? -- but the "catch" here is the recipe must

    > not
    >> include *any* potatoes, flour, rice, pasta, or sugar.

    >
    > I would follow a regular recipe, omit the potatoes and add lots of
    > veggies - zuchini, yellow squash, mushrooms, peppers, carrots (if you
    > can), celery or celery root - just about anything will work in stew or
    > roasts. I often roast a chicken for about an hour, remove from the pan
    > to a plate, add a bunch of mixed veggies in the bottom of the pan, and
    > place the chicken back into the pan on top of the veggies. Roast for
    > an additional 30-45 minutes. I season all with garlic, onion powder,
    > and then a saltless spice mix - either one designed for chicken or a
    > Mrs. Dash brand. I roast the chicken with some stock or water in the
    > bottom of the pan - you may need to add more when you add the veggies.
    > I cover it with foil the last 15 minutes or so, sometimes, too.
    > Also check out the Sugar Busters diet book - lots of good info.
    >
    > -L.
    >


    Thanks. I like the suggestion for saltless spice mixes because I am also
    tryint to limit salt intake. I'll look into the Sugar Busters book.

    I do have a number of recipe books, but every recipe for stews and pot roast
    seems to emphasize potatoes.

    MaryL
     
  4. Michael Odom

    Michael Odom Guest

    On Tue, 1 Feb 2005 22:43:10 -0600, "MaryL"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Can anyone suggest some good (but *easy*) recipes for beef, lamb, pork or
    >chicken stew or roasts? -- but the "catch" here is the recipe must not
    >include *any* potatoes, flour, rice, pasta, or sugar. I have diabetes, and
    >I have found that I can keep my blood glucose levels well under control if I
    >completely avoid those items. A single slice of whole wheat bread will send
    >my sugar spiking, so the only bread I eat is Ezekiel bread (a flourless
    >bread made from sprouted grains -- purchased at a health food store and must
    >be kept frozen or refrigerated). Obviously, I get sugar through the fresh
    >fruit I eat, but I do not *add* any at all. My diet is not nearly as
    >limiting as this sounds -- lots of fresh veggies, fruit, lean meat, eggs,
    >etc. plus nuts and low-fat cheese -- but I do not spend a lot of time in the
    >kitchen and would like some quick but tasty recipes.
    >
    >I am new to this group, and I apologize if this question has previously been
    >asked and answered.
    >
    >Thanks for the help.
    >MaryL
    >

    You might look into the South Beach diet cookbook. I'm not expert in
    such things, but it appears to be basically diabetic friendly. That's
    what D says, anyhow, and her mom has been diabetic for 67 years.


    modom

    "Dallas is a rich man with a death wish in his eyes."
    -- Jimmie Dale Gilmore
     
  5. Dimitri

    Dimitri Guest

    "MaryL" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Can anyone suggest some good (but *easy*) recipes for beef, lamb, pork or
    > chicken stew or roasts? -- but the "catch" here is the recipe must not
    > include *any* potatoes, flour, rice, pasta, or sugar. I have diabetes,
    > and I have found that I can keep my blood glucose levels well under
    > control if I completely avoid those items. A single slice of whole wheat
    > bread will send my sugar spiking, so the only bread I eat is Ezekiel bread
    > (a flourless bread made from sprouted grains -- purchased at a health food
    > store and must be kept frozen or refrigerated). Obviously, I get sugar
    > through the fresh fruit I eat, but I do not *add* any at all. My diet is
    > not nearly as limiting as this sounds -- lots of fresh veggies, fruit,
    > lean meat, eggs, etc. plus nuts and low-fat cheese -- but I do not spend a
    > lot of time in the kitchen and would like some quick but tasty recipes.
    >
    > I am new to this group, and I apologize if this question has previously
    > been asked and answered.
    >
    > Thanks for the help.
    > MaryL



    Go here:

    http://atkins.com/food/index.html

    Click on recipes.

    It is a sensational source for low carb/no carb recipes

    Dimitri
     
  6. MaryL

    MaryL Guest

    "Michael Odom" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Tue, 1 Feb 2005 22:43:10 -0600, "MaryL"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Can anyone suggest some good (but *easy*) recipes for beef, lamb, pork or
    >>chicken stew or roasts? -- but the "catch" here is the recipe must not
    >>include *any* potatoes, flour, rice, pasta, or sugar. I have diabetes,
    >>and
    >>I have found that I can keep my blood glucose levels well under control if
    >>I
    >>completely avoid those items. A single slice of whole wheat bread will
    >>send
    >>my sugar spiking, so the only bread I eat is Ezekiel bread (a flourless
    >>bread made from sprouted grains -- purchased at a health food store and
    >>must
    >>be kept frozen or refrigerated). Obviously, I get sugar through the fresh
    >>fruit I eat, but I do not *add* any at all. My diet is not nearly as
    >>limiting as this sounds -- lots of fresh veggies, fruit, lean meat, eggs,
    >>etc. plus nuts and low-fat cheese -- but I do not spend a lot of time in
    >>the
    >>kitchen and would like some quick but tasty recipes.
    >>
    >>I am new to this group, and I apologize if this question has previously
    >>been
    >>asked and answered.
    >>
    >>Thanks for the help.
    >>MaryL
    >>

    > You might look into the South Beach diet cookbook. I'm not expert in
    > such things, but it appears to be basically diabetic friendly. That's
    > what D says, anyhow, and her mom has been diabetic for 67 years.
    >
    >
    > modom
    >
    > "Dallas is a rich man with a death wish in his eyes."
    > -- Jimmie Dale Gilmore


    Yes, as a matter of fact I went on the South Beach diet soon after I was
    diagnosed as diabetic (at the advice of some friends who have had diabetes
    for some time). SB does not eliminate all potatoes, rice, pasta, and sugar
    as I have done -- that was added in because of the diabetes -- but it
    otherwise has worked very well for me. I have lost a considerable amount of
    weight, my BG is under control, and I have better cholesterol and
    triglycerides readings. I was just looking for some additional ideas of how
    to add to basic roasts and stews (something to add to them, in addition to
    eliminating the potatoes) -- and the responses on this group have given me
    lots of ideas. Anyway, I strongly recommend SB to anyone with similar
    problems. I have lost weight, and I have done it without ever being hungry
    because that diet calls for so many fresh veggies.

    MaryL
     
  7. MaryL

    MaryL Guest

    "Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "MaryL" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> Can anyone suggest some good (but *easy*) recipes for beef, lamb, pork or
    >> chicken stew or roasts? -- but the "catch" here is the recipe must not
    >> include *any* potatoes, flour, rice, pasta, or sugar. I have diabetes,
    >> and I have found that I can keep my blood glucose levels well under
    >> control if I completely avoid those items. A single slice of whole wheat
    >> bread will send my sugar spiking, so the only bread I eat is Ezekiel
    >> bread (a flourless bread made from sprouted grains -- purchased at a
    >> health food store and must be kept frozen or refrigerated). Obviously, I
    >> get sugar through the fresh fruit I eat, but I do not *add* any at all.
    >> My diet is not nearly as limiting as this sounds -- lots of fresh
    >> veggies, fruit, lean meat, eggs, etc. plus nuts and low-fat cheese -- but
    >> I do not spend a lot of time in the kitchen and would like some quick but
    >> tasty recipes.
    >>
    >> I am new to this group, and I apologize if this question has previously
    >> been asked and answered.
    >>
    >> Thanks for the help.
    >> MaryL

    >
    >
    > Go here:
    >
    > http://atkins.com/food/index.html
    >
    > Click on recipes.
    >
    > It is a sensational source for low carb/no carb recipes
    >
    > Dimitri
    >


    Looks good! Atkins and South Beach (which I am using) have some
    differences, but they are similar enough that I can make good use of those
    recipes.

    Thanks,
    MaryL
     
  8. Michael Odom

    Michael Odom Guest

    On Wed, 2 Feb 2005 16:41:59 -0600, "MaryL"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Michael Odom" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> On Tue, 1 Feb 2005 22:43:10 -0600, "MaryL"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Can anyone suggest some good (but *easy*) recipes for beef, lamb, pork or
    >>>chicken stew or roasts? -- but the "catch" here is the recipe must not
    >>>include *any* potatoes, flour, rice, pasta, or sugar. I have diabetes,
    >>>and
    >>>I have found that I can keep my blood glucose levels well under control if
    >>>I
    >>>completely avoid those items. A single slice of whole wheat bread will
    >>>send
    >>>my sugar spiking, so the only bread I eat is Ezekiel bread (a flourless
    >>>bread made from sprouted grains -- purchased at a health food store and
    >>>must
    >>>be kept frozen or refrigerated). Obviously, I get sugar through the fresh
    >>>fruit I eat, but I do not *add* any at all. My diet is not nearly as
    >>>limiting as this sounds -- lots of fresh veggies, fruit, lean meat, eggs,
    >>>etc. plus nuts and low-fat cheese -- but I do not spend a lot of time in
    >>>the
    >>>kitchen and would like some quick but tasty recipes.
    >>>
    >>>I am new to this group, and I apologize if this question has previously
    >>>been
    >>>asked and answered.
    >>>
    >>>Thanks for the help.
    >>>MaryL
    >>>

    >> You might look into the South Beach diet cookbook. I'm not expert in
    >> such things, but it appears to be basically diabetic friendly. That's
    >> what D says, anyhow, and her mom has been diabetic for 67 years.

    >
    >Yes, as a matter of fact I went on the South Beach diet soon after I was
    >diagnosed as diabetic (at the advice of some friends who have had diabetes
    >for some time). SB does not eliminate all potatoes, rice, pasta, and sugar
    >as I have done -- that was added in because of the diabetes -- but it
    >otherwise has worked very well for me. I have lost a considerable amount of
    >weight, my BG is under control, and I have better cholesterol and
    >triglycerides readings. I was just looking for some additional ideas of how
    >to add to basic roasts and stews (something to add to them, in addition to
    >eliminating the potatoes) -- and the responses on this group have given me
    >lots of ideas. Anyway, I strongly recommend SB to anyone with similar
    >problems. I have lost weight, and I have done it without ever being hungry
    >because that diet calls for so many fresh veggies.
    >
    >MaryL
    >

    I didn't read your original post closely enough, Mary. The whole
    wheat (and brown rice and buckwheat noodles, etc.) option has worked
    well for D, now I see it isn't right for you. It's my impression,
    however, that SB does not allow any potatoes at all, nor any processed
    starches or added sugars. At least that's how I've been cooking for D
    these last 65 lbs. and more.

    My basic attitude is to add tons of flavor to make up for the reduced
    carbohydrates and eliminated fats. Tonight, for example, I marinated
    pork chops in minced garlic, curry powder, lemon juice, a touch of
    lime pickle, orange pulp, black pepper, turmeric, and olive oil. I
    sweated some mushroom slices with curry powder, cumin seed, and S&P in
    olive oil and added more lemon juice, lime pickle, and homemade
    chicken stock to make a sauce. Then I seared the chops in a steel
    skillet before adding the mushroom sauce and the remaining marinade.
    I put the whole thing in the oven to finish at 375F. When it was done
    (about 17 minutes later), I put the skillet on a burner, got it
    simmering and added about two big hands full of fresh spinach. When
    the spinach was wilted, it was done.

    It took about 45 minutes to cook the meal, including some roasted
    cauliflower and zucchini. It could have been less time, but I wasn't
    very organized and spent too much time figuring out what I was going
    to do while I was doing it. This is no trouble for me since I love
    cooking, but I can see how someone else wouldn't want it that way.


    modom

    "Dallas is a rich man with a death wish in his eyes."
    -- Jimmie Dale Gilmore
     
  9. MaryL

    MaryL Guest

    "Michael Odom" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Wed, 2 Feb 2005 16:41:59 -0600, "MaryL"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>

    > I didn't read your original post closely enough, Mary. The whole
    > wheat (and brown rice and buckwheat noodles, etc.) option has worked
    > well for D, now I see it isn't right for you. It's my impression,
    > however, that SB does not allow any potatoes at all, nor any processed
    > starches or added sugars. At least that's how I've been cooking for D
    > these last 65 lbs. and more.
    >
    > >

    > modom
    >
    > "Dallas is a rich man with a death wish in his eyes."
    > -- Jimmie Dale Gilmore


    Actually, SB does permit potatoes and certain other starches after the first
    two weeks, but only in limited quantities. I have chosen to completely
    eliminate them because of their effect on my BG (and I am doing very well).
    This is the first "diet" I have ever been on that has worked well for me.
    All others left me with cravings for sweets, hunger pangs, nervousness, etc.
    I haven't had any of those problems with SB (using it since June 6, 2004).
    Many diabetics can eat *all* foods and must simply restrict the quantities.
    I have found that it is better for me to completely eliminate added sugar,
    etc. because I always had such terrible cravings in the past, and I am now
    very comfortable with this diet. If I am hungry, I do eat -- but I select
    healthier foods, and I really do not feel deprived or resentful at giving up
    desserts. I satisfy my sweet tooth by having plenty of fresh fruit,
    sometimes with a little nonfat plain yogurt.

    MaryL
     
  10. Hahabogus

    Hahabogus Guest

    "MaryL" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > I satisfy my sweet tooth by having plenty of fresh fruit,
    > sometimes with a little nonfat plain yogurt.
    >
    >


    fruit except rhubarb ain't low carb. Allowed veggies: 1 tomato a day,
    bell pepers,green/yellow beans, brocolli, cauliflower, spinach, most
    lettuces, raddishes, cucumbers,bean sprouts, most nuts, some squashes
    (spaghetti squash), eggs, mushrooms. The harder cheeses, sour cream, most
    meats.

    set yourdelf up with a allowed list, a restricted use list (carrots,
    onions etc...) and a no-no list
    (flour(pasta,bread,cake,pastry),rice,corn,potatoes, etc).

    Use your BG meter to determine on what list goes what. Most type2
    Diabetics have different carb settings...I seem to be ok at about 25-35
    carbs per day. Keeps me in the low 5's mmol or high 90's mg/dl.
    A BG reading over 7.8 mmol or 140mg/dl indicates permenent damage is
    being done to your body so stay well away from that high. There are
    several good diabetic newsgroups. Alt.support.diabetes, misc.health
    diabetes.

    If you have MasterCook Mad's Emphroium has a low carb cookbook.



    --
    No Bread Crumbs were hurt in the making of this Meal.
    Type 2 Diabetic 1AC 5.6mmol or 101mg/dl
    Continuing to be Manitoban
     
  11. MaryL

    MaryL Guest

    "Hahabogus" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:Xns95F1E43E69F61hahabog[email protected]
    > "MaryL" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> I satisfy my sweet tooth by having plenty of fresh fruit,
    >> sometimes with a little nonfat plain yogurt.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > fruit except rhubarb ain't low carb. Allowed veggies: 1 tomato a day,
    > bell pepers,green/yellow beans, brocolli, cauliflower, spinach, most
    > lettuces, raddishes, cucumbers,bean sprouts, most nuts, some squashes
    > (spaghetti squash), eggs, mushrooms. The harder cheeses, sour cream, most
    > meats.
    >
    > set yourdelf up with a allowed list, a restricted use list (carrots,
    > onions etc...) and a no-no list
    > (flour(pasta,bread,cake,pastry),rice,corn,potatoes, etc).
    >
    > Use your BG meter to determine on what list goes what. Most type2
    > Diabetics have different carb settings...I seem to be ok at about 25-35
    > carbs per day. Keeps me in the low 5's mmol or high 90's mg/dl.
    > A BG reading over 7.8 mmol or 140mg/dl indicates permenent damage is
    > being done to your body so stay well away from that high. There are
    > several good diabetic newsgroups. Alt.support.diabetes, misc.health
    > diabetes.
    >
    > If you have MasterCook Mad's Emphroium has a low carb cookbook.
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > No Bread Crumbs were hurt in the making of this Meal.
    > Type 2 Diabetic 1AC 5.6mmol or 101mg/dl
    > Continuing to be Manitoban


    You are correct. Fruit has carbs. However, I have been following the basic
    South Beach principles. That program emphasizes what they call "good
    carbs," not "low carb." So, I really am not on a low carb diet, except that
    I am getting far fewer carbs than I did in the past. I completely avoid
    flour, pasta, rice, and sugar because they increase my BG levels (even whole
    wheat bread). However, I seem to do fine with fruit. I don't eat huge
    quantities, of course, but I will have fresh strawberries several times a
    week, along with several other berries and occasionally an apple and even a
    banana a couple times a week. I love fresh pineapple, but I do avoid that
    because of the high sugar content. My BG was 289 when first diagnosed in
    June 2004 but I now average 94. I do eat most of the items on your list
    (lots of fresh veggies, low fat meat, low fat cheese, eggs, nuts in
    moderation, etc.). My carbs are not *nearly* as low as what you list, but
    so far I have been doing well on this regime. My only diabetes medication
    is one 500mg Metformin ER per day. My doctor even suggested that I try
    eliminating that now and watch my meter to see if there has been any effect.
    However, I am concerned about doing that and have continued with the
    Metformin -- I want to discuss this some more at our next meeting.

    MaryL
     
  12. Hahabogus

    Hahabogus Guest

    "MaryL" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > . My carbs are not *nearly* as low as what you list, but
    > so far I have been doing well on this regime. My only diabetes
    > medication is one 500mg Metformin ER per day. My doctor even
    > suggested that I try eliminating that now and watch my meter to see
    > if there has been any effect. However, I am concerned about doing
    > that and have continued with the Metformin -- I want to discuss this
    > some more at our next meeting.
    >
    > MaryL
    >
    >


    Glycemic index dieting doesn't work for me. There only seems to be 1
    type of carb for me, fast acting and Glucose rising. So I need to lower
    total carb intake. I don't require any medication because my BG isn't
    excessively high any more.

    --
    No Bread Crumbs were hurt in the making of this Meal.
    Type 2 Diabetic 1AC 5.6mmol or 101mg/dl
    Continuing to be Manitoban
     
  13. Dan Abel

    Dan Abel Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Hahabogus
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    > carbs per day. Keeps me in the low 5's mmol or high 90's mg/dl.
    > A BG reading over 7.8 mmol or 140mg/dl indicates permenent damage is
    > being done to your body so stay well away from that high. There are



    Are you talking about fasting bg? I thought that 140 was on the edge of
    acceptable. Mine was 143 last time I had blood drawn, and the doctor said
    that that was OK. Of course, I also had an A1C of 6.1, so maybe that's
    why. I took a look at the American Diabetes Association website, and they
    are saying that under 100 is normal, over 126 is diabetes and in between
    is pre-diabetes.

    --
    Dan Abel
    Sonoma State University
    AIS
    [email protected]
     
  14. Dan Abel wrote:
    >
    > In article <[email protected]>, Hahabogus
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > carbs per day. Keeps me in the low 5's mmol or high 90's mg/dl.
    > > A BG reading over 7.8 mmol or 140mg/dl indicates permenent damage is
    > > being done to your body so stay well away from that high. There are

    >
    > Are you talking about fasting bg? I thought that 140 was on the edge of
    > acceptable. Mine was 143 last time I had blood drawn, and the doctor said
    > that that was OK. Of course, I also had an A1C of 6.1, so maybe that's
    > why. I took a look at the American Diabetes Association website, and they
    > are saying that under 100 is normal, over 126 is diabetes and in between
    > is pre-diabetes.


    Yes, those are the current ranges. A repeated fasting BG of over 125
    confirms a diagnosis of diabetes. If your doctor said a fasting BG of
    143 is "ok" then you need another doctor! And a second fasting BG test
    to confirm the diagnosis.

    Two years ago I got a fasting BG of 130. I immediately started
    low-carbing, and in two weeks a repeat test was 103, which at the time
    was below the bottom of the "prediabetes" range. (They've since dropped
    that bottom from 110 to 100.) So my official diagosis is Metabolic
    Syndrome, although my endocrinologist made clear to me that he was
    putting that down purely for my insurance company, since I hadn't
    technically qualified for the real diagnosis of diabetes. Privately, he
    wanted to be sure I understood that he was confirming my understanding
    that I had diabetes.

    I recommend Gretchen Becker's book on the first year with type 2
    diabetes. She's got a lot of useful information in there, and it's
    written in a very panic-reducing way. ;-)

    I think it's time for you to start learning. Sorry!

    Priscilla
    --
    "Just because I don't throw a hissy fit and leave on account of the
    'Jesus is my boyfriend' music doesn't mean I approve of it --- it just
    means I've learned to understand the difference between having a
    different opinion from someone and having a different religion."
    - Leslie Terrell in newsgroup alt.religion.christian.episcopal
     
  15. Hahabogus

    Hahabogus Guest

    [email protected] (Dan Abel) wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Are you talking about fasting bg? I thought that 140 was on the
    > edge of acceptable. Mine was 143 last time I had blood drawn, and
    > the doctor said that that was OK. Of course, I also had an A1C of
    > 6.1, so maybe that's why. I took a look at the American Diabetes
    > Association website, and they are saying that under 100 is normal,
    > over 126 is diabetes and in between is pre-diabetes.
    >
    >

    Yes I'm talking fasting, or first thing in the morning...

    Get another doctor!

    7.0 at a 1AC is around 126 mg/dl which is the mark of the curse up
    here...in the UK 6.8mmol is. So 7.0 * 18.06= roughly 126 or 127 give or
    take. At 140mg/dl or 7.8mmol you are doing permenent damage to your body
    (sludge is collecting in your arteries). Which leads to blockage, clots,
    strokes, leg loss, nerve damage and blindness...

    Perhaps you have a older doctor who isn't up to speed.

    I have no ciatations I can remember so check it out at
    Alt.Support.Diabetes.

    --
    No Bread Crumbs were hurt in the making of this Meal.
    Type 2 Diabetic 1AC 5.6mmol or 101mg/dl
    Continuing to be Manitoban
     
  16. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Dan Abel) wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, Hahabogus
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    > > carbs per day. Keeps me in the low 5's mmol or high 90's mg/dl.
    > > A BG reading over 7.8 mmol or 140mg/dl indicates permenent damage is
    > > being done to your body so stay well away from that high. There are

    >
    >
    > Are you talking about fasting bg? I thought that 140 was on the edge of
    > acceptable. Mine was 143 last time I had blood drawn, and the doctor said
    > that that was OK. Of course, I also had an A1C of 6.1, so maybe that's
    > why. I took a look at the American Diabetes Association website, and they
    > are saying that under 100 is normal, over 126 is diabetes and in between
    > is pre-diabetes.


    It sounds to me that, if that is your FASTING BG and you have that high
    of an A1C, you are headed for type II diabetes.

    Better do something now. :-o

    My fasting is only 90 and my A1C is 2.6.

    I'm 42.

    You need to find a new Doctor. :-(
    --
    K.

    Sprout the MungBean to reply

    "I don't like to commit myself about heaven and hell‹you
    see, I have friends in both places." --Mark Twain
     
  17. On Thu, 03 Feb 2005 18:02:11 -0600, Katra <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >My fasting is only 90 and my A1C is 2.6.


    2.6? Holy cow! The lowest I've ever gotten mine was 5.0. I'll use your
    results as inspiration, if you wouldn't mind.

    Carol
    --
    "Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
    'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
    Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

    *James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
     
  18. Damsel in dis Dress <[email protected]> wrote:
    : On Thu, 03 Feb 2005 18:02:11 -0600, Katra <[email protected]>
    : wrote:

    :>My fasting is only 90 and my A1C is 2.6.

    : 2.6? Holy cow! The lowest I've ever gotten mine was 5.0. I'll use your
    : results as inspiration, if you wouldn't mind.

    2.6 is a misprint: 4.0 is approximately equivalent to an
    *average*--not fasting, blood glucose reading of 65. 2.6
    and you'd be fighting for your life.
    --thelma
     
  19. MaryL

    MaryL Guest

    "Dan Abel" <[email protected]onic.net> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>, Hahabogus
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >> carbs per day. Keeps me in the low 5's mmol or high 90's mg/dl.
    >> A BG reading over 7.8 mmol or 140mg/dl indicates permenent damage is
    >> being done to your body so stay well away from that high. There are

    >
    >
    > Are you talking about fasting bg? I thought that 140 was on the edge of
    > acceptable. Mine was 143 last time I had blood drawn, and the doctor said
    > that that was OK. Of course, I also had an A1C of 6.1, so maybe that's
    > why. I took a look at the American Diabetes Association website, and they
    > are saying that under 100 is normal, over 126 is diabetes and in between
    > is pre-diabetes.
    >
    > --
    > Dan Abel
    > Sonoma State University
    > AIS
    > [email protected]


    My doctor says that anything over 100 (fasting BG) is now considered to be
    diabetes. Most authorities believe that damage is done when BG rises above
    140. I suggest that you consult another doctor and have new tests.

    MaryL
     
  20. On 4 Feb 2005 00:37:08 GMT, Thelma Lubkin <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > 2.6 is a misprint: 4.0 is approximately equivalent to an
    > *average*--not fasting, blood glucose reading of 65. 2.6
    > and you'd be fighting for your life.


    When I went to the ER last week for pneumonia, there was a woman who
    sounded like she was dying. Then she got really quiet. The doctor talked
    at length with the husband, explaining that his wife had likely just
    suffered a stroke. She couldn't talk, etc.

    Then the lab work came back. Her blood sugar was 30. They gave her
    glucose, and she was a new woman! Kept her overnight for observation.

    I know what 40 feels like, and I don't ever want to go there again.

    Thanks for the clarification, Thelma.

    Carol
    --
    "Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
    'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
    Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

    *James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
     
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