Rescue bad brie?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Frogleg, Mar 11, 2004.

  1. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    Got a wedge of President brie yesterday that gave a bit
    through the (opaque) wrapper. Left it on the counter
    overnight and opened it this morning. The cut sides are
    covered in the white mold; the interior has pockets of well-
    established mold; and the consistency is roughly the same as
    a well-done steak. Yes, I know. Never again. Cheese options
    are few and far between here, and I took a chance.

    Q: is there any magic formula to get this over-age, under-
    ripe lump to become edible, or am I going to have to
    schlep back across town to return it?
     
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  2. Darkginger

    Darkginger Guest

    "Frogleg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Got a wedge of President brie yesterday that gave a bit
    > through the (opaque) wrapper. Left it on the counter
    > overnight and opened it this morning. The cut sides are
    > covered in the white mold; the interior has pockets of well-
    > established mold; and the consistency is roughly the same
    > as a well-done steak. Yes, I know. Never again. Cheese
    > options are few and far between here, and I took a chance.
    >
    > Q: is there any magic formula to get this over-age, under-
    > ripe lump to become edible, or am I going to have to
    > schlep back across town to return it?

    I can't think of anything you could do to rescue your Brie,
    I'm afraid to say. Usually I find the opposite problem -
    cheese that's sold too young, and has to be kept for at
    least a week before it goes gloopy. Once it leaves the
    gloopy stage and solidifies, not only does it look
    'orrible, it tastes like old socks. Sorry to be the bearer
    of sad tidings!

    (on the other hand, if anyone knows different, I'd be
    delighted to hear it!)

    Jo

    ---
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  3. Darkginger

    Darkginger Guest

    "Frogleg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Got a wedge of President brie yesterday that gave a bit
    > through the (opaque) wrapper. Left it on the counter
    > overnight and opened it this morning. The cut sides are
    > covered in the white mold; the interior has pockets of well-
    > established mold; and the consistency is roughly the same
    > as a well-done steak. Yes, I know. Never again. Cheese
    > options are few and far between here, and I took a chance.
    >
    > Q: is there any magic formula to get this over-age, under-
    > ripe lump to become edible, or am I going to have to
    > schlep back across town to return it?

    I can't think of anything you could do to rescue your Brie,
    I'm afraid to say. Usually I find the opposite problem -
    cheese that's sold too young, and has to be kept for at
    least a week before it goes gloopy. Once it leaves the
    gloopy stage and solidifies, not only does it look
    'orrible, it tastes like old socks. Sorry to be the bearer
    of sad tidings!

    (on the other hand, if anyone knows different, I'd be
    delighted to hear it!)

    Jo

    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-
    virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.614 /
    Virus Database: 393 - Release Date: 05/03/04
     
  4. Sf

    Sf Guest

    On Thu, 11 Mar 2004 12:15:59 GMT, Frogleg
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Got a wedge of President brie yesterday that gave a bit
    > through the (opaque) wrapper. Left it on the counter
    > overnight and opened it this morning. The cut sides are
    > covered in the white mold; the interior has pockets of
    > well-established mold; and the consistency is roughly the
    > same as a well-done steak. Yes, I know. Never again.
    > Cheese options are few and far between here, and I took a
    > chance.
    >
    > Q: is there any magic formula to get this over-age, under-
    > ripe lump to become edible, or am I going to have to
    > schlep back across town to return it?

    You have a choice: return it or toss it.

    Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
  5. Sf

    Sf Guest

    On Thu, 11 Mar 2004 12:15:59 GMT, Frogleg
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Got a wedge of President brie yesterday that gave a bit
    > through the (opaque) wrapper. Left it on the counter
    > overnight and opened it this morning. The cut sides are
    > covered in the white mold; the interior has pockets of
    > well-established mold; and the consistency is roughly the
    > same as a well-done steak. Yes, I know. Never again.
    > Cheese options are few and far between here, and I took a
    > chance.
    >
    > Q: is there any magic formula to get this over-age, under-
    > ripe lump to become edible, or am I going to have to
    > schlep back across town to return it?

    You have a choice: return it or toss it.

    Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
  6. Steve Knight

    Steve Knight Guest

    On Thu, 11 Mar 2004 12:15:59 GMT, Frogleg <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Got a wedge of President brie yesterday that gave a bit
    >through the (opaque) wrapper. Left it on the counter
    >overnight and opened it this morning.
    well since that cheese is never very good anyway it's hard
    to improve it (G)

    --
    Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes Custom made wooden planes
    at reasonable prices See http://www.knight-toolworks.com For
    prices and ordering instructions.
     
  7. Steve Knight

    Steve Knight Guest

    On Thu, 11 Mar 2004 12:15:59 GMT, Frogleg <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Got a wedge of President brie yesterday that gave a bit
    >through the (opaque) wrapper. Left it on the counter
    >overnight and opened it this morning.
    well since that cheese is never very good anyway it's hard
    to improve it (G)

    --
    Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes Custom made wooden planes
    at reasonable prices See http://www.knight-toolworks.com For
    prices and ordering instructions.
     
  8. Limey

    Limey Guest

    "Darkginger" wrote in message

    > "Frogleg" wrote in message
    > > > Got a wedge of President brie yesterday that gave a
    > > > bit through the
    > > (opaque) wrapper. Left it on the counter overnight and
    > > opened it this morning. The cut sides are covered in the
    > > white mold; the interior has pockets of well-established
    > > mold; and the consistency is roughly the same as a well-
    > > done steak. Yes, I know. Never again. Cheese options are
    > > few and far between here, and I took a chance.
    > >
    > > Q: is there any magic formula to get this over-age, under-
    > > ripe lump to become edible, or am I going to have to
    > > schlep back across town to return it?
    >
    > I can't think of anything you could do to rescue your
    > Brie, I'm afraid to say. Usually I find the opposite
    > problem - cheese that's sold too young,
    and
    > has to be kept for at least a week before it goes gloopy.
    > Once it leaves
    the
    > gloopy stage and solidifies, not only does it look
    > 'orrible, it tastes
    like
    > old socks. Sorry to be the bearer of sad tidings!
    >
    > (on the other hand, if anyone knows different, I'd be
    > delighted to hear
    it!)
    >
    > Jo
    >
    First - Frogleg, I love cheese and have heard all the
    arguments about its being fine even if it's covered in mold,
    but if the mold is on the inside, I think your only recourse
    is to do that schlep across town.

    Second - to Jo -

    Funny you should say. I bought some Brie which was way too
    young. I stuck it in the refrigerator and totally forgot it
    for some time. When I dug it out again, it tasted exactly
    like Saga, which is Swedish (I believe) and quite a premium
    cheese. "Old socks"? Pretty good description - but remember,
    I love Roquefort, Limburger, Stilton and gorgonzola, so the
    smellier the better. :)

    Dora
     
  9. Limey

    Limey Guest

    "Darkginger" wrote in message

    > "Frogleg" wrote in message
    > > > Got a wedge of President brie yesterday that gave a
    > > > bit through the
    > > (opaque) wrapper. Left it on the counter overnight and
    > > opened it this morning. The cut sides are covered in the
    > > white mold; the interior has pockets of well-established
    > > mold; and the consistency is roughly the same as a well-
    > > done steak. Yes, I know. Never again. Cheese options are
    > > few and far between here, and I took a chance.
    > >
    > > Q: is there any magic formula to get this over-age, under-
    > > ripe lump to become edible, or am I going to have to
    > > schlep back across town to return it?
    >
    > I can't think of anything you could do to rescue your
    > Brie, I'm afraid to say. Usually I find the opposite
    > problem - cheese that's sold too young,
    and
    > has to be kept for at least a week before it goes gloopy.
    > Once it leaves
    the
    > gloopy stage and solidifies, not only does it look
    > 'orrible, it tastes
    like
    > old socks. Sorry to be the bearer of sad tidings!
    >
    > (on the other hand, if anyone knows different, I'd be
    > delighted to hear
    it!)
    >
    > Jo
    >
    First - Frogleg, I love cheese and have heard all the
    arguments about its being fine even if it's covered in mold,
    but if the mold is on the inside, I think your only recourse
    is to do that schlep across town.

    Second - to Jo -

    Funny you should say. I bought some Brie which was way too
    young. I stuck it in the refrigerator and totally forgot it
    for some time. When I dug it out again, it tasted exactly
    like Saga, which is Swedish (I believe) and quite a premium
    cheese. "Old socks"? Pretty good description - but remember,
    I love Roquefort, Limburger, Stilton and gorgonzola, so the
    smellier the better. :)

    Dora
     
  10. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On Thu, 11 Mar 2004 18:30:29 -0500, "limey" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >> "Frogleg" wrote in message
    >> > > Got a wedge of President brie yesterday that gave a
    >> > > bit through the
    >> > (opaque) wrapper. Left it on the counter overnight and
    >> > opened it this morning. The cut sides are covered in
    >> > the white mold; the interior has pockets of well-
    >> > established mold; and the consistency is roughly the
    >> > same as a well-done steak. Yes, I know. Never again.
    >> > Cheese options are few and far between here, and I took
    >> > a chance.

    >First - Frogleg, I love cheese and have heard all the
    >arguments about its being fine even if it's covered in
    >mold, but if the mold is on the inside, I think your only
    >recourse is to do that schlep across town.

    Sorry for not describing it better. This wasn't blue or
    black mold, but the white fuzz mold that eventually creates
    brie's 'crust'. The cheese wasn't too young. It was
    evidently packaged under-ripe too long ago. Oh, for a
    "reputable cheese merchant" close to home!
     
  11. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On Thu, 11 Mar 2004 18:30:29 -0500, "limey" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >> "Frogleg" wrote in message
    >> > > Got a wedge of President brie yesterday that gave a
    >> > > bit through the
    >> > (opaque) wrapper. Left it on the counter overnight and
    >> > opened it this morning. The cut sides are covered in
    >> > the white mold; the interior has pockets of well-
    >> > established mold; and the consistency is roughly the
    >> > same as a well-done steak. Yes, I know. Never again.
    >> > Cheese options are few and far between here, and I took
    >> > a chance.

    >First - Frogleg, I love cheese and have heard all the
    >arguments about its being fine even if it's covered in
    >mold, but if the mold is on the inside, I think your only
    >recourse is to do that schlep across town.

    Sorry for not describing it better. This wasn't blue or
    black mold, but the white fuzz mold that eventually creates
    brie's 'crust'. The cheese wasn't too young. It was
    evidently packaged under-ripe too long ago. Oh, for a
    "reputable cheese merchant" close to home!
     
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