Restaurant Rules

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by [email protected], Jan 17, 2006.

  1. Tags:


  2. Ken

    Ken Guest

  3. Andy

    Andy Guest

    "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote
    in news:[email protected]:

    > These rules are rather amusing and probably true.
    > http://blogs.smh.com.au/entertainment/archives/the_tribal_mind/003016.h
    > tml John Kane, Kingston ON Canada
    >


    Two observations I've seen.

    1. After years of tablecloths and then a recent switch to paper placemats
    is not a good sign, or is it?

    2. As a dishwasher and as God is my witness I've seen a waiter after
    clearing a table, return to the kitchen and take a huge bite out of a
    barely eaten rack of lamb before dumping the plate in the "clean me" bin.

    Andy
     
  4. kevnbro

    kevnbro Guest

    >2. As a dishwasher and as God is my witness I've seen a waiter after
    >clearing a table, return to the kitchen and take a huge bite out of a
    >barely eaten rack of lamb before dumping the plate in the "clean me" bin.


    >Andy


    Considering the fact that most restaurant patrons, (particularly those
    serving racks of lamb) use a fork and knife to eat it- what's the big
    deal?

    Beats throwing a perfectly good piece of lamb in the trash. Kev
     
  5. Andy

    Andy Guest

    "kevnbro" <[email protected]> wrote in news:1137682407.879868.125730
    @g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:

    >>2. As a dishwasher and as God is my witness I've seen a waiter after
    >>clearing a table, return to the kitchen and take a huge bite out of a
    >>barely eaten rack of lamb before dumping the plate in the "clean me"

    bin.
    >
    >>Andy

    >
    > Considering the fact that most restaurant patrons, (particularly those
    > serving racks of lamb) use a fork and knife to eat it- what's the big
    > deal?



    I suppose so but to see a waiter in a tuxedo grabbing the rack in his
    fist and chomping off a huge chunk into his fat face just bothered me.

    Andy
     
  6. kevnbro

    kevnbro Guest

    >I suppose so but to see a waiter in a tuxedo grabbing the rack in his
    >fist and chomping off a huge chunk into his fat face just bothered me.


    >Andy


    I think Andy you were just angry that you were washing dishes and he
    was eating lambchops. ;) kev
     
  7. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "Andy" <q> wrote

    > "kevnbro" <[email protected]al.net> wrote


    >>>2. As a dishwasher and as God is my witness I've seen a waiter after
    >>>clearing a table, return to the kitchen and take a huge bite out of a
    >>>barely eaten rack of lamb before dumping the plate in the "clean me"

    > bin.


    >> Considering the fact that most restaurant patrons, (particularly those
    >> serving racks of lamb) use a fork and knife to eat it- what's the big
    >> deal?


    > I suppose so but to see a waiter in a tuxedo grabbing the rack in his
    > fist and chomping off a huge chunk into his fat face just bothered me.
    >
    > Andy


    Andy wins on ick factor, hands down.

    nancy
     
  8. Andy

    Andy Guest

    "kevnbro" <[email protected]> wrote in news:1137683679.117149.175040
    @g47g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:

    >>I suppose so but to see a waiter in a tuxedo grabbing the rack in his
    >>fist and chomping off a huge chunk into his fat face just bothered me.

    >
    >>Andy

    >
    > I think Andy you were just angry that you were washing dishes and he
    > was eating lambchops. ;) kev



    I was a happy dishwasher. The entire staff would get served a special
    (not on the menu) dinner prepared by the chefs before we opened. We all
    sat around a large round table and had beer or wine with our meal. Then
    we went to work. Occassionally I'd have to fill pitchers of beer for the
    chefs. Occassionally I'd earn a glass during dishwashing.

    It was a posh gourmet french restaurant and only opened for dinners on
    Saturday and Sunday.

    I don't know if any of those rules are observed at other restaurants.

    Andy
     
  9. Andy

    Andy Guest

    "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote in news:dqoamp$80b$1
    @news.monmouth.com:

    >
    > "Andy" <q> wrote
    >
    >> "kevnbro" <[email protected]> wrote

    >
    >>>>2. As a dishwasher and as God is my witness I've seen a waiter after
    >>>>clearing a table, return to the kitchen and take a huge bite out of a
    >>>>barely eaten rack of lamb before dumping the plate in the "clean me"

    >> bin.

    >
    >>> Considering the fact that most restaurant patrons, (particularly

    those
    >>> serving racks of lamb) use a fork and knife to eat it- what's the big
    >>> deal?

    >
    >> I suppose so but to see a waiter in a tuxedo grabbing the rack in his
    >> fist and chomping off a huge chunk into his fat face just bothered me.
    >>
    >> Andy

    >
    > Andy wins on ick factor, hands down.
    >
    > nancy



    nancy,

    It was gross. But back on topic, does this happen in other restaurants? I
    guess... probably.

    Andy
     
  10. Roberta

    Roberta Guest

    Andy wrote:
    > "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote in news:dqoamp$80b$1
    > @news.monmouth.com:
    >
    >
    >>"Andy" <q> wrote
    >>
    >>
    >>>"kevnbro" <[email protected]> wrote

    >>
    >>>>>2. As a dishwasher and as God is my witness I've seen a waiter after
    >>>>>clearing a table, return to the kitchen and take a huge bite out of a
    >>>>>barely eaten rack of lamb before dumping the plate in the "clean me"
    >>>
    >>>bin.

    >>
    >>>> Considering the fact that most restaurant patrons, (particularly

    >
    > those
    >
    >>>>serving racks of lamb) use a fork and knife to eat it- what's the big
    >>>>deal?

    >>
    >>>I suppose so but to see a waiter in a tuxedo grabbing the rack in his
    >>>fist and chomping off a huge chunk into his fat face just bothered me.
    >>>
    >>>Andy

    >>
    >>Andy wins on ick factor, hands down.
    >>
    >>nancy

    >
    >
    >
    > nancy,
    >
    > It was gross. But back on topic, does this happen in other restaurants? I
    > guess... probably.
    >
    > Andy
    >
    >


    Sure it happens in other restraunts - I was a waitress for years and saw
    more than one person eat food off of a customers plate :p Sorta made me
    feel sick to see it lol

    Roberta (in VA)
     
  11. Nancy Young wrote:
    > "Andy" <q> wrote
    > > I suppose so but to see a waiter in a tuxedo grabbing the rack in his
    > > fist and chomping off a huge chunk into his fat face just bothered me.

    >
    > Andy wins on ick factor, hands down.


    Think of the dude out back who digs it out of the dumpster 6 hours
    later...

    --Blair
     
  12. On 19 Jan 2006 14:20:42 -0800, "Blair P. Houghton"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Nancy Young wrote:
    >> "Andy" <q> wrote
    >> > I suppose so but to see a waiter in a tuxedo grabbing the rack in his
    >> > fist and chomping off a huge chunk into his fat face just bothered me.

    >>
    >> Andy wins on ick factor, hands down.

    >
    >Think of the dude out back who digs it out of the dumpster 6 hours
    >later...


    Very sad. I used to buy extra food for lunch, then give it to a
    street person. It's tragic to see someon digging through trash
    looking for dinner.

    Carol
     
  13. Ken

    Ken Guest


    > >
    > >Think of the dude out back who digs it out of the dumpster 6 hours
    > >later...

    >
    > Very sad. I used to buy extra food for lunch, then give it to a
    > street person. It's tragic to see someon digging through trash
    > looking for dinner.
    >
    > Carol


    Carol,

    Last time I was at a Chinese restaurant, a street person came up and
    asked for money because he was hungry. We said no. As he was walking
    away, I asked the person I was with if they were going to being eating
    the leftovers. They said no. I called to the guy and asked him if he
    was actually hungry. He said yes, and he got all of the leftovers.
    (He seemed truly thankful.) Because it was a Chinese place, the
    leftovers were from the serving plates, not our individual plates, so
    the food was untouched by us.

    Seemed to be the right thing to do.

    Ken
     
  14. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "Ken" <[email protected]> wrote

    > was actually hungry. He said yes, and he got all of the leftovers.
    > (He seemed truly thankful.) Because it was a Chinese place, the
    > leftovers were from the serving plates, not our individual plates, so
    > the food was untouched by us.
    >
    > Seemed to be the right thing to do.


    It kinda haunts me a little, one time I walked out of the
    Stage Deli, I think it was, I left half a sandwich untouched
    on my plate. Homeless guy sitting outside, looked like he
    coulda used it. Don't get me wrong, I know why he chose
    that corner, everyone has leftovers there I'd think, but too
    bad that awesome brisket on rye didn't go to better use.

    In case anyone out there thinks, wow, what a nice person,
    she'd give the guy half a sandwich ... those sandwiches are
    enormous. I can't eat more than half if I tried like hell.
    Huge.

    nancy
     
  15. Ken

    Ken Guest


    > In case anyone out there thinks, wow, what a nice person,
    > she'd give the guy half a sandwich ... those sandwiches are
    > enormous. I can't eat more than half if I tried like hell.
    > Huge.
    >
    > nancy


    Nancy,

    Years ago, when I was doing a big consulting job in Pasadena, I went to
    the nearest market to get groceries. A guy hit me up for money on the
    way in. Sorry, I didn't need my money going into his arm or to the
    nearest liquor store. So in the market, I buy some extra fruit, bag it
    separately, and give it to him on the way out of the store. He turned
    it down, refused it, wouldn't take it. He was nice about it and did
    say thanks for the thought. I'd forgotten all about that until this
    thread reminded me.

    I have to say that 95% of the time, the homeless people act like I gave
    them the Hope Diamond when I've bought them a hamburger or whatever.

    Ken
     
  16. On 19 Jan 2006 19:37:12 -0800, "Ken" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Years ago, when I was doing a big consulting job in Pasadena, I went to
    >the nearest market to get groceries. A guy hit me up for money on the
    >way in. Sorry, I didn't need my money going into his arm or to the
    >nearest liquor store. So in the market, I buy some extra fruit, bag it
    >separately, and give it to him on the way out of the store. He turned
    >it down, refused it, wouldn't take it. He was nice about it and did
    >say thanks for the thought. I'd forgotten all about that until this
    >thread reminded me.
    >
    >I have to say that 95% of the time, the homeless people act like I gave
    >them the Hope Diamond when I've bought them a hamburger or whatever.


    If you live in an area with homeless people panhandling for their next
    meal, fix, or drink, it's a nice idea to carry books of food
    certificate books, like from McDonald's, etc. They can use it for
    food.

    Carol
     
  17. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "Damsel in dis Dress" <[email protected]> wrote

    > On 19 Jan 2006 19:37:12 -0800, "Ken" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>Years ago, when I was doing a big consulting job in Pasadena, I went to
    >>the nearest market to get groceries. A guy hit me up for money on the
    >>way in. Sorry, I didn't need my money going into his arm or to the
    >>nearest liquor store.


    >>I have to say that 95% of the time, the homeless people act like I gave
    >>them the Hope Diamond when I've bought them a hamburger or whatever.

    >
    > If you live in an area with homeless people panhandling for their next
    > meal, fix, or drink, it's a nice idea to carry books of food
    > certificate books, like from McDonald's, etc. They can use it for
    > food.


    Good idea. Yeah, I don't mind giving someone a meal, but I
    don't want anything to do with them buying drugs/whatever got them
    in that predicament to start with. That's no help.

    nancy
     
  18. Dave Bugg

    Dave Bugg Guest

    Damsel in dis Dress wrote:

    > Very sad. I used to buy extra food for lunch, then give it to a
    > street person. It's tragic to see someon digging through trash
    > looking for dinner.


    Here in Wenatchee, we have a great men's shelter and mission -- Hospitality
    House. Anyone -- not just the residents -- can get a free meal at
    breakfast, lunch, and dinner. My store sends Hospitality House all of our
    meat that is left over at the end of the day -- we don't reheat anything. We
    are one of the few sources of donated meats that they have. Most other
    stores will send produce and dairy, but there is a lack of meat in the
    donations.
    --
    Dave
    www.davebbq.com
     
  19. On Thu, 19 Jan 2006 23:23:25 -0500, "Nancy Young"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Damsel in dis Dress" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >> If you live in an area with homeless people panhandling for their next
    >> meal, fix, or drink, it's a nice idea to carry books of food
    >> certificate books, like from McDonald's, etc. They can use it for
    >> food.

    >
    >Good idea. Yeah, I don't mind giving someone a meal, but I
    >don't want anything to do with them buying drugs/whatever got them
    >in that predicament to start with. That's no help.


    From what I understand, a large percentage of homeless people are
    there because of mental illness. Especially with the more severe
    illnesses, people tend not to want to take their medication, so they
    become unable to function normally in society.

    Carol
     
  20. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    >
    >> >
    >> >Think of the dude out back who digs it out of the dumpster 6 hours
    >> >later...

    >>
    >> Very sad. I used to buy extra food for lunch, then give it to a
    >> street person. It's tragic to see someon digging through trash
    >> looking for dinner.
    >>
    >> Carol

    >
    > Carol,
    >
    > Last time I was at a Chinese restaurant, a street person came up and
    > asked for money because he was hungry. We said no. As he was walking
    > away, I asked the person I was with if they were going to being eating
    > the leftovers. They said no. I called to the guy and asked him if he
    > was actually hungry. He said yes, and he got all of the leftovers.
    > (He seemed truly thankful.) Because it was a Chinese place, the
    > leftovers were from the serving plates, not our individual plates, so
    > the food was untouched by us.
    >
    > Seemed to be the right thing to do.
    >
    > Ken


    I've done this in Pioneer Square, Seattle, where there used to be plenty of
    street persons around the restaurants. Talk about being thankful! I've
    heard the Seattle people tried or have removed them from this area; I wonder
    where they are eating now.
    Dee Dee
     
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