resting heart rate

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by nitrogenmustard, Jul 12, 2004.

  1. corin

    corin New Member

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    It means you're a stud! If you don't already race you should sign up for an age group race, you might surprise yourself and win.
     


  2. bcwildthing

    bcwildthing New Member

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    Jeez, thanks corin, but I might havta lose another 15 pounds first so I look more studly in my racing gear <heh :D >. Don't they say that cycling improves health and fitness "in many areas"?

    Only thing, I'm not too keen about racing until I can take the long hills without pounding in my head. I need to pass my first 100 mile test on my new bike too. Thanks for the encouragement!
     
  3. Doctor Morbius

    Doctor Morbius New Member

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    Good God that makes me feel better. My resting HR is about the same as it was last year around this time, which is 58. Sounds like my fitness levels haven't improved. :(
     
  4. xbgs351

    xbgs351 New Member

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    My resting heart rate is in the low 40's. I have had it down to 32 but that was in a state of fatigue.
     
  5. joule

    joule New Member

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    Well am 47 and just getting back into riding so expect mine is pretty high for a biker. Took blood pressure and pulse a couple of days ago 109/67 and 71 tho was only about an hour after a ride. Well hope to see all those number go down but still not too bad for someone my age.

    BTW, back when I raced many decades ago, found out you cannot give blood when pressure and heart rate get down there. Had a resting pulse of 40 in my 20 something years and 90/50 and they would not take my blood. Said I would not stay concious after it lol.

    And if you ever get in an accident, warn the amblulance crew. They got pretty concerned when they saw my pulse at 45, but of course was just normal for me then. Happened in a criterim race (last lap). On the way to the hospital I looked down and saw my hand was broken. Ask the attendent in the ambulance if I would ever be able to play the piano again. He said "Sure, will heal up in a few weeks". I said "Wow.. never could play the piano before!". Needless to say was in good spirits hehe.
     
  6. HellonWheels

    HellonWheels New Member

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    I finally figured out how to do a resting heart rate thing...we used a machine we bought. My resting heart rate is 40. Is this normal or bad? I don't fully understand this.

    My BP is 110/69, is this too low?? BTW I'm almost 45 yrs old, female, and not menopausal. I'm also very physically active.
     
  7. SilentGTboy

    SilentGTboy New Member

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    It's been a month since I last posted and the lowest it was then was 43.
    Now it can get down to 36 which is freaking awesome!
     
  8. Beastt

    Beastt New Member

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    I'd have to place it in the "awesome" range, HellonWheels. All else being equal, females usually have slightly elevated heart rates as compared to men. A woman's heart is a little smaller in proportion to her body than is a man's so it has to do more work to provide the same level of circulation. That's why when figuring ballpark target zones, men are told to start with 220 while women should use 226. (Of course there are several different methods and the 220-age or 226-age offers a very general maximum.) I've seen charts that suggest a normal resting heart rate for an adult in the 70 to 100 range. I think 70 to 90 is more realistic but as you strengthen your heart, that number should fall. Your blood pressure also looks great. The diastolic, (69) could be maybe just a smidgeon lower but there is absolutely nothing wrong with it where it is. The systolic, (110), is certainly ideal for someone your age - maybe even just a little low. But as long as you don't suffer lightheadedness when you rise quickly from sitting to standing, low is good.

    There are certainly people on the forum who can give you a much better understanding of what these numbers mean that I can but I'll try to give you a brief, simplistic over-view. Your resting heart rate, as long as you're healthy, gives a general idea of your level of fitness. Since the heart is a muscle, when it is exercised, it becomes larger and stronger. A larger, stronger heart doesn't need to pump as often to supply the tissues with the necessary quantity of blood.

    Each time your heart contracts, deoxygenated blood is sent from the right ventricle (bottom-right quadrant or "compartment") of the heart to the lungs where it passes waste gasses like carbon dioxide to the lungs and picks up oxygen which adheres to the hemoglobin of the red blood cells. The left ventricle sends oxygenated blood through the aorta to ever branching and narrowing arteries to be delivered to all parts of the body. Each contraction of the heart raises the pressure within the circulatory system. This raised pressure is reflected in the top number, (systolic pressure), which in your case was 110 mmHG (millimeters of mercury). Once the heart relaxes, the pressure in the circulatory system falls to a static pressure. This is reflected by the bottom number, (diastolic pressure). Generally speaking, lower numbers indicate better overall fitness and better health. Doctors usually begin to caution patients when their systolic pressure nears or exceeds 140. Diastolic pressure becomes a concern when it rises to 90 or higher. Of course as with everything, different charts use different numbers and there are other forms of hypertension which show themselves in complex interplays between the two numbers.

    Higher blood pressure puts a greater strain on the heart and can be used as one of the more reliable indicators for the likelihood of developing heart disease. People who suffer from hypertension are often cautioned about the amount of salt in their diet. The body tends to try to maintain an electrolyte balance so as more salt reaches the bloodstream, the body draws more water into the blood to try to maintain the balance. The result is a higher blood volume within the same basic circulatory volume so the pressure rises. As your numbers show, exercise and diet are great ways to help to control blood pressure.
     
  9. HellonWheels

    HellonWheels New Member

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    Wow....this is amazing, esp. considering that I think I'm still regarded as a little overweight for my height. Just goes to show, you can't judge a body by its cover! (lol)
     
  10. TheToad

    TheToad New Member

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    I'm 26, my resting heart rate used be around 75bpm. I've been cycling for about 12 months was only doing about 170Kms a week on average, my RHR was back down to 55, I was quite suprised at how quick your heart rate does drop. It took me less than six months (oh and about 10Kilos/22lbs) to get into the 50's. I have recently started riding about 250Kms a week and I have noticed that my RHR has dropped sharply over the last two months as well. I've mixed up my training a lot and pushed a lot of hill climbing into my schedule (hills are my absolute weakest point :( ) and its down around 50bpm when I first wake up..

    thanks Beastt for that blood preasure info, I never really knew what the two numbers actually meant .. ie diastolic over systolic
     
  11. wallis

    wallis New Member

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    i dont think i'v measured mine right, feeling the vein in my wrist it beats 18 times in 15 seconds, making 72. i'm 14 and ride a whole lot (just got bak from a trip of 500k in 5 days)
     
  12. Genero Nagual

    Genero Nagual New Member

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    Yep, just sitting here I decided to take mine...56. Once upon a time woulda thought that was pretty good. Actually I still do. Happy enuff. That's less than one beat per year for my age.
     
  13. beanfoto2

    beanfoto2 New Member

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    Heart monitors? Don't talk to me about heart monitors.

    Only time I've used a heart monitor is on the exercise bikes in a gym.

    I was born with a hole in the heart. Have been told it has totally healed over but still have an "irregular" heart beat apparently.

    Trouble is heart monitors seem to be calibrated to the average. Several times when pedalling on the exercise bike, (at various cadences), the thing has started screeching, and the trainers have sprinted for the emergency CPR kit.

    Bit embarrassing really.

    In view of my history, can I count on a heart monitor giving me accurate readings?

    PS. My blood pressure also goes thru the roof as soon as I see a blood pressure machine, ( had one of the 24 hour jobbies from the hospital, it shows a relativley normal average).
    :(
     
  14. ed073

    ed073 New Member

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    Is it safe for you to train?? That sounds pretty serious.
     
  15. omer

    omer New Member

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    I read, for lowest heart rate reading, one needs to sleep with a heart rate monitor with recording feature, since the heart beats lowest couple of hours before waking up.

    I checked this method on me, ended up with 4-5 beats lower minimum reading on HRM than the normal wake-up reading.

     
  16. jbieryjr

    jbieryjr New Member

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    Dude,

    I have the same problem with my heart. Hole in the wall and had surger when I was 16 to correct the problem. Now 41 and riding centuries and 12 mile sprints. You can train with a heart monitor.

    First, do not buy a cheap model. The sensitivity will vary between models. With the irregular heart beat a cheap model will pick the imperfection and just beep wildly.

    Buy a good HR monitor. Does not have to be the most expensive one. Recommend to get one that you can calibrate to your personal settings.

    Set the monitor by running the test program. Find your max and set your zones of training.

    One, thing periodically you will get beeps that do not sound right. Don't worry it might just be the skipping to the heart being picked up. Occasionally my HR monitor will go to Zero for a few seconds, this is usually when I am training too hard and need to bring it back a few notches.

    Also, don't be afraid to try out the model in the store. The batteries come with the product. I had to try a couple of models before finding the one I wanted.

    Also, make sure that a MD is following you. If you feel any s/s fo dizziness, SOB, weakness, sedation after riding then you want to get check out.


    Good Luck
     
  17. limerickman

    limerickman Moderator

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    All of what Beastt has posted here is fine.

    I just want to highlight one issue as regards BP readings.
    In my family, there is a history of BP and coronary problems.
    I take my blood pressure readings several times per day, at the exact time,
    each day and every day.
    In order to get a clear understanding of ones blood pressure, one should adopt the same format : minimum readings twice per day : one reading should be taken first thing in the morning and the other reading should be taken at a time when you're not overly stressed.

    It's essential that when you are taking a reading that you have neither eaten or drank anything for the past 60 minutes and that you are sitting in the correct position when taking the reading.
    There should be no conversation while the reading is being taken and try to take a reading in a location where there are no distractions.
    You should also take these readings approximately 2 hours after any strenuous activity (strenuous activity can include walking for more than 20
    consecutive minutes - altered heart rates can blur actual BP readings).

    Record the readings after you have taken them - each day.
    After one month - you should be able to get an accurate picture of your blood pressure.
    Once off readings are ineffectual and are a snapshot.

    Blood Pressure is a silent killer - you can suffer from too high/low blood pressure without your knowledge.
    Therefore, if you are able to purchase a monitor and record your BP, you may well prevent possible problems at a later date.

    Ideally, the gold standard BP reading is 120/80 or 115/75.
    The average human heart beat is 72 beats per minute.
     
  18. bike4miles2

    bike4miles2 New Member

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    Inderan was down to 28 bpm. That's the lowest I have ever heard of..
     
  19. bikeshop

    bikeshop New Member

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    Just had a cathedal ablation (heart cath) operation on Thursday. Resting heart rate is 40. (scared the nurse, she thought it was incorrect, or a problem till I told her I was a bike racer). Should be training again on Monday. Doc said in the early 80s it would have been open heart surgery, but now, Im only off the bike for 3 days. Isnt modern medicine incredible. www.the-bike-shop.com/training
     
  20. wildearth2001

    wildearth2001 New Member

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    My during the day resting HR (like when I am just doing stuff around the house or chatting with friends) is about 60-65. When I am walking around Walmart or my LBS it is around 75. My true resting HR (just as I am getting out of bed or sitting during long classes) is 40-45. Right now my HR is about 64 but I just got done with some situps and a 20min roller session about an hour ago. My primary sport is swimming and that right there helps keep my resting HR low but I also do a lot of hypoxic swimming workouts in addition to the normal practices and do some static apnea just for fun (my personal record is 2:10)
     
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