resting heart rate



wildearth2001

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Nov 19, 2003
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bike4miles2 said:
Inderan was down to 28 bpm. That's the lowest I have ever heard of..
For cyclists I think it might be, but some free divers can lower there HR to 15-20 or lower, one guy claims he aceived 7bmp but I have not seen evidence (though Im not saying I think he is lying either, I am just not sure)
 

ItsikH

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Sep 24, 2004
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I got as low as 37, and started from 55 (7 years ago), now I am back to 40. At first I was alarmed, but a cardiologist I went to assured me I am in perfect condition - said I was wasting his time, actually :eek: (He did examine me thoroughly, though, before saying so :rolleyes: ).

As far as I have heard, HR, and rest HR specifically, give just a general indication of fitness - some professional cyclers have unusually *high* rest HR, but most of them do have low HR, around 40.
 

AmpedCycle

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Dec 29, 2004
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Mine's about 42 +/-. I used to use stimulants like ephedra and I'm wondering if it would be lower if I hadn't. ??
 

hophead

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Oct 1, 2003
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Last time I checked it was 48. Probably a bit higher now since I haven't been riding as much lately.
 

pineapple

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Oct 3, 2003
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So I'm confused... I always thought resting heart rate was taken when you're just relaxed and haven't been exercising.

But is it actually meant to be taken when you get up in the morning, or when you're practically dozing off?
 

hophead

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Oct 1, 2003
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pineapple said:
So I'm confused... I always thought resting heart rate was taken when you're just relaxed and haven't been exercising.

But is it actually meant to be taken when you get up in the morning, or when you're practically dozing off?
For me, my heart rate when I first wake up is about the same as if I just lay down for 5 minutes or so.
 

dcast10101

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Jul 18, 2004
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First of all I haven't started cycling yet and am off regular athletics because of the business of school. I know that that is an awful excuse but I am getting back at it. I'm 17, male, and used to play tons of sports (easily 3 hrs a day).
Anyhow, my resting heart beat (not when I wake up but just sitting on the couch in the morning is 70-72 bpm, awful. But that being said my blood pressure when I am at school and moderately stress is 80/60, so maybe the heartrate is compensating. Anyhow..... hopefully I can get back to my former fitness, and being a young'in I have no doubt.
 

nitrogenmustard

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Feb 3, 2004
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hey guys,
i wore my hrm to sleep last night-33 bpm, which kinda scared me at first-idk, just fun stuff that im dying to tell

-nitro
 

puffdaddy

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Jan 21, 2005
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jbieryjr said:
Dude,


Also, make sure that a MD is following you. If you feel any s/s fo dizziness, SOB, weakness, sedation after riding then you want to get check out.


Good Luck
Hey, what's with 'sedation' after riding? My doctor has been running a bunch of tests on my heart after finding mitral valve prolapse and some other random symptoms. I've been wondering if something is going on with the need to sleep after exercise (its a battle to stay awake, seriously).

Is that what you are talking about?
 

jbieryjr

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Apr 15, 2004
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puffdaddy said:
Hey, what's with 'sedation' after riding? My doctor has been running a bunch of tests on my heart after finding mitral valve prolapse and some other random symptoms. I've been wondering if something is going on with the need to sleep after exercise (its a battle to stay awake, seriously).

Is that what you are talking about?


Puffdaddy,
Yes sedation after you ride can be a symptom of either a low heart rate or an inappropriate function of the heart. Since you have Mitral valve prolapse, a complication were there is a inappropriate filling of the heart chambers resulting in a decrease in outflow of the blood, sedation can be a symptom. Training with a HR monitor can be very beneficial. By staying within your zone heart rate you can minimize these symptoms. You my not be able to total stop the sedation, but by not forcing your heart into an elevated zone, you can minimize these problems. Since you have been diagnosed with a heart defect, please make sure you keep your doctor informed of your training and progress. I cannot stress the benefit of communication with you MD enough. Also, ask you MD to suggest any Cardiotherapist in your area. These are training experts that are educated in cardiac function. At my facility we use them for all patient with heart problems. They can set you up with the proper HR levels for an effective training. Good Luck.
 

S. Thomas

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Jan 31, 2005
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Wow, mine is up at 62, but that's probably because I'm growing - I'm only 15 and I know that the resting heart rate goes down as you age.
 

EvilGoodGuy

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Jul 31, 2004
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My resting heart rate is 42 on average, sometimes 45 under heavy training. But when I was sick I hit a resting heart rate of 90. I thought I was going to have a heart attack.
 

li rider

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Oct 11, 2004
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nitrogenmustard said:
hi everyone

i just went to wal-mart a few days ago, and whilst i was waiting for my perscription i sat down at that heart rate/blood pressure thing that they have, and to my astonishmnt, my heart rate was 37bpm. that is way lower than most other people that i know, but is it lower than other cyclists?
p.s.-what ould be the bpm of a professional endurance rider?

-nitro
37 is low, but low is good if measures a strong heart. but be sure you got it correct. then remember ever time you see a doctor, etc. to tell them that that is your normal heart rate so they don't freak out and run to shoot you up with something.

mine is 48.
 

pinchflat

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Apr 29, 2005
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well, guys and girls, let me just add this datum:

when the medicos were watching my heart, they got really uncomfortable when I'd drift below mid 40s at rest. My oxygen level was fine, just slow heart rate. They'd mumble about brachycardia and slap me around a little to get it back to a higher level.

subsequently had the ablation procedure for atrial fibs, and my resting pulse is now waaay higher... 70-80.

on known hill climbs, tho, there seems to be no difference between when I did it with a resting pulse below 50, and doing the same climb now with a resting pulse of over 70. In my case, resting pulse doesn't seem to indicate much on the bike, and, remember, always, keep it above 0!
 

Carrera

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Feb 2, 2004
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My resting pulse is lousy. I was stunned how bad it is for someone who has done weights for many years and been cycling for almost 2 years. I frequently get a 60 reading and the best I ever scored was 52 this morning.
However, I'm a reasonably good climber given my weight (about 196) and seem to be passing other riders a lot more than in the past.
I take my pulse either at the neck or wrist. I notice it stays very high the evening after a very hard ride. I wonder whether this is a serious disadvantage to my cycling ambitions?
 

Doctor Morbius

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Mar 15, 2004
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Carrera said:
My resting pulse is lousy. I was stunned how bad it is for someone who has done weights for many years and been cycling for almost 2 years. I frequently get a 60 reading and the best I ever scored was 52 this morning.
However, I'm a reasonably good climber given my weight (about 196) and seem to be passing other riders a lot more than in the past.
I take my pulse either at the neck or wrist. I notice it stays very high the evening after a very hard ride. I wonder whether this is a serious disadvantage to my cycling ambitions?
I would imagine that after a hard ride your pulse is more likely to stay high as your metabolism has been jacked up a notch - thermogenic effects and all that rot.

I'm just starting my 3rd year of cycing and my resting pulse hasn't really dropped much after the initial 6 months so I'm in the same boat. Kind of discouraging isn't it? From what some of the other posters have told me, it just takes years. 52 sounds pretty good to me. I'm stuck around 58 BPM!
 

dhk

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Sep 1, 2003
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Doctor Morbius said:
I would imagine that after a hard ride your pulse is more likely to stay high as your metabolism has been jacked up a notch - thermogenic effects and all that rot.

I'm just starting my 3rd year of cycing and my resting pulse hasn't really dropped much after the initial 6 months so I'm in the same boat. Kind of discouraging isn't it? From what some of the other posters have told me, it just takes years. 52 sounds pretty good to me. I'm stuck around 58 BPM!
But, what makes you think resting pulse rate is correlated to aerobic fitness? My resting pulse was the lowest (46 bpm) when I was dieting, at my lowest weight, and just doing easy riding back in '03. Now that I'm eating and riding/training more miles, it's up to 52-54. But, my HR on the club rides is much lower now, so it's easier to hang with the group and not run out of steam near the end. That's what counts.

If you want a lower resting pulse, just cut 500-1000 calories from your diet, and restrict your exercise to a 30 minute walk a day. Bet you'll see a difference in a week.
 

mitosis

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Jun 21, 2004
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dhk said:
But, what makes you think resting pulse rate is correlated to aerobic fitness? My resting pulse was the lowest (46 bpm) when I was dieting, at my lowest weight, and just doing easy riding back in '03. Now that I'm eating and riding/training more miles, it's up to 52-54. But, my HR on the club rides is much lower now, so it's easier to hang with the group and not run out of steam near the end. That's what counts.

If you want a lower resting pulse, just cut 500-1000 calories from your diet, and restrict your exercise to a 30 minute walk a day. Bet you'll see a difference in a week.

Just type resting heart rate into a search engine. Every site will note the correlation between resting pulse and aerobic fitness. ;)