Restricting to lose stubborn fat



cyclechick00

New Member
Nov 12, 2007
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Hi. I know nutrition is important when training, and I've posted things relevant to this before, but I was wondering if I was doing something wrong and please let me know so I can change to get the best benefit. I'm training about 45 min/day on trainer, do 30min. of moderate weight training after that, I also try to jump rope and do about 200 crunches - which I've read mixed reviews about the crunches.

Anyways, I stick to the same basic diet and my goal is not to go over 1000-1200 cal/day. Tuna on wheat with mustard for dinner with an apple, a zone bar for a snack, some other fruit in there for snacking during the day, soy nuts, plain oatmeal for breakfast, granola, natural peanut butter on a whole wheat english muffin, Myoplex soy protein shake after ride, no alcohol...and I really don't stray away from that.

My question - I understand I may be gaining muscle, but my weight has actually gone up 3lbs. Should I bump up my cycling to lose the stomach fat? Everything else is where I want it to be, it just seems I can't get rid of the gut. Too much protein? What am I doing wrong?
 

BernardM

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Nov 25, 2007
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What is your height and weight? Bodyfat %? Age? How long have you been training? Try to get about 12 calories per pound of bodyweight. Of those calories get around 1 gram of protein per pound of bodyweight, then 1.5 grams of carbohydrates per pound of bodyweight and the remaining calories are for fats. Try to get your carbs from low glycemic index sources (E.g. whole wheat pasta, cereals, vegetables, etc. ) stay away from sugars and starchy foods, that probably mean get rid of the granola and the zone bar since they have a high sugar content, try myoplex carb control bars. Eat good fats such as omega-three and stay away from saturated fats.

1000-1200 is too vague you are either eating 1000 or 1200 because 200 calories per day week after week is a pretty large difference. I am not saying that this is the right number since I have no idea what your weight is.

Don't get too crazy about the crunches, crunches by itself do not remove fat they will only help you shape the muscles underneath the gut.

I hope this helps. I have a very stubborn metabolism yet I am able to stay pretty lean using the above mentioned diet.


cyclechick00 said:
Hi. I know nutrition is important when training, and I've posted things relevant to this before, but I was wondering if I was doing something wrong and please let me know so I can change to get the best benefit. I'm training about 45 min/day on trainer, do 30min. of moderate weight training after that, I also try to jump rope and do about 200 crunches - which I've read mixed reviews about the crunches.

Anyways, I stick to the same basic diet and my goal is not to go over 1000-1200 cal/day. Tuna on wheat with mustard for dinner with an apple, a zone bar for a snack, some other fruit in there for snacking during the day, soy nuts, plain oatmeal for breakfast, granola, natural peanut butter on a whole wheat english muffin, Myoplex soy protein shake after ride, no alcohol...and I really don't stray away from that.

My question - I understand I may be gaining muscle, but my weight has actually gone up 3lbs. Should I bump up my cycling to lose the stomach fat? Everything else is where I want it to be, it just seems I can't get rid of the gut. Too much protein? What am I doing wrong?
 

cyclechick00

New Member
Nov 12, 2007
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0
BernardM said:
What is your height and weight? Bodyfat %? Age? How long have you been training?

I'm 5"1', 129lbs, and I'm 29, My bodyfat it 23%. I've been riding for around five years and training indoors about a month so far this season. I'm so afraid to get on the scale because every time I do it goes up. The 1000 cal/day are pretty balanced, 40-30-30 and I don't eat junk food, soda, sugar nothing.

I get mixed answers because some people say to load up on the carbs before I train, then some say no protein. I'm very confused.
 

benkoostra

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Mar 7, 2006
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If the mirror tells you you are losing weight, even if very slowly, just keep doing what you're doing. Belly fat is the last to go, so be very patient.

You should not cut calories anymore. In fact, I would say you should eat about 1500/day in order to keep your metabolism from bogging down.
 

tonyzackery

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Dec 23, 2006
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cyclechick00 said:
BernardM said:
What is your height and weight? Bodyfat %? Age? How long have you been training?

I'm 5"1', 129lbs, and I'm 29, My bodyfat it 23%. I've been riding for around five years and training indoors about a month so far this season. I'm so afraid to get on the scale because every time I do it goes up. The 1000 cal/day are pretty balanced, 40-30-30 and I don't eat junk food, soda, sugar nothing.

I get mixed answers because some people say to load up on the carbs before I train, then some say no protein. I'm very confused.
Basically there is no 1 truly correct and right answer for everyone. We all have different physiologies, metabolisms, heights, weights, etc..., but most importantly - parents. Your geneaology is the single most significant determinant of how much and where your fat will be distributed, everything else being equal.

IMO, you need to choose and commit to a protocol for several months and see if you're getting any results. If not, try something else. There is no miracle bellyfat reducer out there that works for every body...As I mentioned though, you must commit fully to whatever protocol you decide to employ because half-assing it will never get you the results you desire. Best of luck on your journey...
 

cyclechick00

New Member
Nov 12, 2007
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tonyzackery said:
Basically there is no 1 truly correct and right answer for everyone. We all have different physiologies, metabolisms, heights, weights, etc..., but most importantly - parents. Your geneaology is the single most significant determinant of how much and where your fat will be distributed, everything else being equal.

IMO, you need to choose and commit to a protocol for several months and see if you're getting any results. If not, try something else. There is no miracle bellyfat reducer out there that works for every body...As I mentioned though, you must commit fully to whatever protocol you decide to employ because half-assing it will never get you the results you desire. Best of luck on your journey...


I know and I look at my father who's very thin and my mother who's 90lbs. and I know it must be something I'm doing wrong. I've committed to a 1000 cal/day diet and training on the bike every other day with weight training almost every day. I log everything into fitday.com and it's been two weeks and I've maintained the same weight. I guess I just have to give it more time.
 

benkoostra

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Mar 7, 2006
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cyclechick00 said:
I know and I look at my father who's very thin and my mother who's 90lbs. and I know it must be something I'm doing wrong. I've committed to a 1000 cal/day diet and training on the bike every other day with weight training almost every day. I log everything into fitday.com and it's been two weeks and I've maintained the same weight. I guess I just have to give it more time.
Dont use the scale to determine if your losing fat. Weight lifting may cause you to gain weight while you lose fat, so the scale can be deceptive. Use your eyes.
 

matagi

Well-Known Member
Mar 12, 2006
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benkoostra said:
Dont use the scale to determine if your losing fat. Weight lifting may cause you to gain weight while you lose fat, so the scale can be deceptive. Use your eyes.
No, don't use your eyes, get a tape and take some measurements - hip and waist to start with.
 

carver

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Mar 26, 2007
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sounds like your body is a stable mode - it has adapted to the amount of calories you take in. perhaps add some intense workouts on the trainer - jumpstart your sytem. this may facilitate a bit of fat burning.

cyclists like to get carbs from greains. maybe try different grains - wheat and wheat based food tastes great - but maybe try more rice oriented meals. or corn based.
 

BernardM

New Member
Nov 25, 2007
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cyclechick00 said:
BernardM said:
What is your height and weight? Bodyfat %? Age? How long have you been training?

I'm 5"1', 129lbs, and I'm 29, My bodyfat it 23%. I've been riding for around five years and training indoors about a month so far this season. I'm so afraid to get on the scale because every time I do it goes up. The 1000 cal/day are pretty balanced, 40-30-30 and I don't eat junk food, soda, sugar nothing.

I get mixed answers because some people say to load up on the carbs before I train, then some say no protein. I'm very confused.
Carb loading before a 40 minute ride?? I wouldn't carb load unless it would be a 40 minute flat out effort such as a time trial, even then.

I agree with everyone here that a scale is not a good idea, do yourself a favor and get one of those body-fat measurement scales, they are not a 100% accurate but they are great for having a reference. 23% is actually pretty good, you should be able to reach 15-16% with a good diet and some patience. 40-30-30 is a pretty good approach just make sure you get good carb sources I still insist that Zone Bars are not good for diets, with 20 grams of sugar per bar. Good luck!!!
 

root

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Nov 1, 2007
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Not everyone means "carb loading" when they say carb loading :). I would not carb load either for a 40 min ride, but what most people mean by carb loading is having a meal with enough carbs 4 hours before the ride :).

Proper carb loading involves completely exhausing glycogen form the muscles and then loading it up, which I'm sure is not what the OP is saying.
 

ric_stern/RST

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Nov 11, 2002
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root said:
Proper carb loading involves completely exhausing glycogen form the muscles and then loading it up, which I'm sure is not what the OP is saying.

Proper carbo loading does *not* involve "exhausting" glycogen from the muscles (or liver) and then loading up. Research stopped suggesting such things in something like the mid-80's. Carbo loading involves keeping muscle and liver glycogen well topped up at all times, by eating a decent amount of carbs on a daily basis, depending on your estimated energy expenditure per day/week (e.g. people who train hard for ~10 -12 hrs per week need about 7 g of CHO per kg of body mass per day).

Ric