Resveratrol problem

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by [email protected], Dec 24, 2004.

  1. The anti-aging food chemical resveratrol is said to have an anti-cancer
    effect by means of conversion to piceatannol. This conversion requires
    the action of the cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP1B1. Piperine (bioperine)
    is used to increase absorption of curcumin and other supplements and
    inhibits P450 enzymes (generally speaking). Would piperine therefore
    "neutralize" the anti-cancer effect of resveratrol? Any thoughts on
    this?
     
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  2. Larry Hoover

    Larry Hoover Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > The anti-aging food chemical resveratrol is said to have an anti-cancer
    > effect by means of conversion to . This conversion requires
    > the action of the cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP1B1. Piperine (bioperine)
    > is used to increase absorption of curcumin and other supplements and
    > inhibits P450 enzymes (generally speaking). Would piperine therefore
    > "neutralize" the anti-cancer effect of resveratrol? Any thoughts on
    > this?


    I think the generalized statement that piperine inhibits P450 enzymes is overly
    broad. I can find evidence in the literature that piperine inhibits CYP3A family
    enzymes, as well as 2B1, but not of a more general activity.

    I don't see anything that would support the idea that piperine would inhibit
    resveratrol conversion to piceatannol. That conversion seems to be possible with
    functional 1B or 1A.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/...ve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=15276085

    If it's a concern, you could alternate supplements on a daily basis.

    Lar
     
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