Retail Performance Stores asking for customer name.

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Sam Yorko, Aug 23, 2003.

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  1. Sam Yorko

    Sam Yorko Guest

    Went in to my local Performance to buy a Topeak Mountain Morph pump (they're on sale). At the cash
    register, they demanded my name to complete the purchase. Only after I almost walked out did they
    relent on the demand.

    The excuse offered: in case I lost the receipt, they could look up the transaction if I wanted to
    return my purchase.

    Well, OK, that's the story being offered to the customers. And, even believing for the moment that
    that >is< the only reason for getting the customer name, that doesn't preclude some marketing dweeb
    within Performance in the future deciding that there is all this nice customer data just sitting
    around, and it's time to mine it for marketing purposes.

    No thanks.

    Sam
     
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  2. Ray Heindl

    Ray Heindl Guest

    Sam Yorko <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Went in to my local Performance to buy a Topeak Mountain Morph pump (they're on sale). At the cash
    > register, they demanded my name to complete the purchase. Only after I almost walked out did they
    > relent on the demand.
    >
    > The excuse offered: in case I lost the receipt, they could look up the transaction if I wanted to
    > return my purchase.

    They apparently think it's better to insult their customers by assuming they're idiots than to admit
    they want to collect info for their marketing database.

    > Well, OK, that's the story being offered to the customers. And, even believing for the moment that
    > that >is< the only reason for getting the customer name, that doesn't preclude some marketing
    > dweeb within Performance in the future deciding that there is all this nice customer data just
    > sitting around, and it's time to mine it for marketing purposes.
    >
    > No thanks.

    Radio Shack used to ask for a phone number, even for the most trivial purchases. But they were
    always nice about my refusal to give them any info. Once enough people refuse at Performance they'll
    probably quit being obnoxious about it. If not, you can always vote with your feet. Or make up a
    name and address and let them waste the cost of mailing their innumerable catalogs.

    --
    Ray Heindl (remove the X to reply)
     
  3. Dan O'Brasky

    Dan O'Brasky Guest

    It's your name dweeb. They do so at a lot of stores including CompUSA so that they do indeed have a
    way to reference your purchase and it's date and price if you need to return it or it is defective
    and needs to be exchange so that you aren't SOL and they don't have a ticked off customer who they
    have no proof of purchasing through them.

    What is the worst thing they could do with your information anyway? Send you a catalog or sales
    announcement? Geez, stop being so paranoid and by the way, try being polite to salespeople in stores
    instead of an arrogant, self-righteous weenie. The guy making $8 an hour is told to ask for certain
    information. Want to buy an extra phone at your local cellular phone shop, well you'll have to give
    your name. Oh and by the way, if a retailer can track it's customer's purchases, they can develop
    purchase pattern information which can help them to stock product that you want or would be inclined
    to purchase versus something the buyer "thinks" people like because that person does and they can go
    back to their data and say, well you know we sold 5 times as many Continental tires in red as we did
    in the generic tan and black, let's make sure we order appropriately so that we don't disappoint you
    Mr. Customer when you come in to buy another couple sets of red and gee, we ran out 2 weeks ago and
    we won't be able to get any for another 2 weeks...they lose a sale, you leave frustrated, have to go
    elsewhere, you've wasted time and accomplished nothing and spend half the rest of the day finding
    someone else locally who has the tires in the color you want for your ride tomorrow. Isn't that a
    better way to run a company than your way? I'm sure you aren't in sales and you are not in a
    decision-making role whatever you do. And one last thing, if you were the norm, they wouldn't ask
    the question. Maybe you would be more relaxed if you left down your guard, relaxed a bit and got off
    your high horse. I'm sure you pay taxes dude, so uncle Sam already knows who you are and where you
    live. I'm sure your sense of importance is self-importance and I'm sure you are nothing more than a
    cog in someone else's wheel at best. And by the way, try shopping for stuff at a locally owned pro
    shop and support your local merchants for a change. I'm sure you don't mind telling them your name,
    particularly when you drop your bike for some servicing! Or your local cleaner or where you make an
    appointment to get your hair cut or lawn mowed or car serviced. Such inanity! Dan

    "Sam Yorko" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Went in to my local Performance to buy a Topeak Mountain Morph pump (they're on sale). At the cash
    > register, they demanded my name to complete the purchase. Only after I almost walked out did they
    > relent on the demand.
    >
    > The excuse offered: in case I lost the receipt, they could look up the transaction if I wanted to
    > return my purchase.
    >
    > Well, OK, that's the story being offered to the customers. And, even believing for the moment that
    > that >is< the only reason for getting the customer name, that doesn't preclude some marketing
    > dweeb within Performance in the future deciding that there is all this nice customer data just
    > sitting around, and it's time to mine it for marketing purposes.
    >
    > No thanks.
    >
    > Sam
     
  4. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Guest

    On Sat, 23 Aug 2003 14:04:37 -0800, Sam Yorko <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Went in to my local Performance to buy a Topeak Mountain Morph pump (they're on sale). At the cash
    >register, they demanded my name to complete the purchase. Only after I almost walked out did they
    >relent on the demand.
    >
    >The excuse offered: in case I lost the receipt, they could look up the transaction if I wanted to
    >return my purchase.
    >
    >Well, OK, that's the story being offered to the customers. And, even believing for the moment that
    >that >is< the only reason for getting the customer name, that doesn't preclude some marketing dweeb
    >within Performance in the future deciding that there is all this nice customer data just sitting
    >around, and it's time to mine it for marketing purposes.
    >
    >No thanks.
    >
    >Sam

    If you don't want to give a name and the person behind the register is being told by management that
    s/he must get names, give a fake name and address.

    If it is for warranty purposes only, all that counts is you remembering what name you used at
    that store.
     
  5. Pat

    Pat Guest

    x-no-archive:yes

    >
    > If you don't want to give a name and the person behind the register is being told by management
    > that s/he must get names, give a fake name and address.
    >
    > If it is for warranty purposes only, all that counts is you remembering what name you used at
    > that store.

    Yeah, unless they ask for a driver's license to make sure you're the right person!

    Pat in TX
     
  6. Don Wiss

    Don Wiss Guest

    On Sat, 23 Aug 2003, Sam Yorko <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Went in to my local Performance to buy a Topeak Mountain Morph pump (they're on sale). At the cash
    >register, they demanded my name to complete the purchase. Only after I almost walked out did they
    >relent on the demand.
    >
    >The excuse offered: in case I lost the receipt, they could look up the transaction if I wanted to
    >return my purchase.

    So what are they going to do with only your name? Without an address it isn't good for much, other
    than as a way to control returns.

    Don <donwiss at panix.com>.
     
  7. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    "Dan O'Brasky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > It's your name dweeb. They do so at a lot of stores including CompUSA so that they do indeed have
    > a way to reference your purchase and it's date
    and
    > price if you need to return it or it is defective and needs to be exchange so that you aren't SOL
    > and they don't have a ticked off customer who they have no proof of purchasing through them.
    >
    That's what receipts are for. If Joe Customer is too incompetant to safely save his receipts, he
    deserves no support from the retailer.

    > What is the worst thing they could do with your information anyway? Send you a catalog or sales
    > announcement? Geez, stop being so paranoid and by the way, try being polite to salespeople in
    > stores instead of an arrogant, self-righteous weenie. The guy making $8 an hour is told to ask for
    certain
    > information. Want to buy an extra phone at your local cellular phone
    shop,
    > well you'll have to give your name. Oh and by the way, if a retailer can track it's customer's
    > purchases, they can develop purchase pattern information which can help them to stock product that
    > you want or would be inclined to purchase versus something the buyer "thinks" people like
    because
    > that person does and they can go back to their data and say, well you know we sold 5 times as many
    > Continental tires in red as we did in the generic tan and black, let's make sure we order
    > appropriately so that we don't disappoint you Mr. Customer when you come in to buy another couple
    > sets of red and gee, we ran out 2 weeks ago and we won't be able to get any for another 2
    > weeks...they lose a sale, you leave frustrated, have to go elsewhere, you've wasted time and
    > accomplished nothing and spend half the rest of the day finding someone else locally who has the
    > tires in the
    color
    > you want for your ride tomorrow. Isn't that a better way to run a company than your way? I'm sure
    > you aren't in sales and you are not in a decision-making role whatever you do. And one last thing,
    > if you were the norm, they wouldn't ask the question. Maybe you would be more relaxed if you left
    > down your guard, relaxed a bit and got off your high horse. I'm sure you pay taxes dude, so uncle
    > Sam already knows who you are and where you live. I'm sure your sense of importance is
    > self-importance and I'm
    sure
    > you are nothing more than a cog in someone else's wheel at best. And by
    the
    > way, try shopping for stuff at a locally owned pro shop and support your local merchants for a
    > change. I'm sure you don't mind telling them your name, particularly when you drop your bike for
    > some servicing! Or your local cleaner or where you make an appointment to get your hair cut or
    lawn
    > mowed or car serviced. Such inanity! Dan

    As far as tracking their sales, they don't need my name to track the quantities of each product sold
    in a given period; they can do that by scanning the barcode on the product and updating their
    database accordingly.

    Cellular phone service represents an on-going business relationship; of course the vendor has
    both a need and a right to know who I am. Buying a bicycle pump, for cash, is a one-time
    encounter and the vendor has no need, and therefore no right, to know anything about me. You're
    comparing Apples and PCs.

    Personally, I don't really care who tracks what information about me (I don't know about the OP). I
    do get annoyed with companies who want my name and address and phone number when I'm making a small
    cash purchase. They are making a big production, and wasting time, over a trivial sale. Information
    that they don't need they don't get.

    Actually, given the rising number of identity thefts each year, we probably ought not be cavalier
    with our personal information.
     
  8. B. Sanders

    B. Sanders Guest

    "Ray Heindl" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Sam Yorko <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Went in to my local Performance to buy a Topeak Mountain Morph pump (they're on sale). At the
    > > cash register, they demanded my name to complete the purchase. Only after I almost walked out
    > > did they relent on the demand.
    > >
    > > The excuse offered: in case I lost the receipt, they could look up the transaction if I wanted
    > > to return my purchase.
    >
    > They apparently think it's better to insult their customers by assuming they're idiots than to
    > admit they want to collect info for their marketing database.
    >
    > > Well, OK, that's the story being offered to the customers. And, even believing for the moment
    > > that that >is< the only reason for getting the customer name, that doesn't preclude some
    > > marketing dweeb within Performance in the future deciding that there is all this nice customer
    > > data just sitting around, and it's time to mine it for marketing purposes.
    > >
    > > No thanks.
    >
    > Radio Shack used to ask for a phone number, even for the most trivial purchases. But they were
    > always nice about my refusal to give them any info. Once enough people refuse at Performance
    > they'll probably quit being obnoxious about it. If not, you can always vote with your feet. Or
    > make up a name and address and let them waste the cost of mailing their innumerable catalogs.

    Heh. Yeah, I like that idea. We should all use the same name, just to cause a huge, inexplicable
    spike in the data.

    -Barry
     
  9. ireman_1

    ireman_1 New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2003
    Messages:
    578
    Likes Received:
    0
    Barry,
    Could I be a Barry too, but with an "e"? Maybe?;-)

    K.
     
  10. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    Dan Daniel wrote:

    > On Sat, 23 Aug 2003 14:04:37 -0800, Sam Yorko <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Went in to my local Performance to buy a Topeak Mountain Morph pump (they're on sale). At the
    > >cash register, they demanded my name to complete the purchase. Only after I almost walked out did
    > >they relent on the demand.
    > >
    > >The excuse offered: in case I lost the receipt, they could look up the transaction if I wanted to
    > >return my purchase.
    > >
    > >Well, OK, that's the story being offered to the customers. And, even believing for the moment
    > >that that >is< the only reason for getting the customer name, that doesn't preclude some
    > >marketing dweeb within Performance in the future deciding that there is all this nice customer
    > >data just sitting around, and it's time to mine it for marketing purposes.
    > >
    > >No thanks.
    > >
    > >Sam
    >
    > If you don't want to give a name and the person behind the register is being told by management
    > that s/he must get names, give a fake name and address.
    >
    > If it is for warranty purposes only, all that counts is you remembering what name you used at
    > that store.

    You don't mind lying about who you are just to get a cashier out of your face? Sorry. I won't do it.
    Radio Shack used to be prretty insistent about name, etc. blablah,. The proper thing (IMHO) is to
    decline to give up the information and keep your receipt. Why do they need to know? Bernie
     
  11. Sorni

    Sorni Guest

    "B. Sanders" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    >> Heh. Yeah, I like that idea. We should all use the same name, just to
    > cause a huge, inexplicable spike in the data.

    "Fabrizio."

    Bill "personally don't mind getting catalogs and sale flyers" S.
     
  12. > Went in to my local Performance to buy a Topeak Mountain Morph pump (they're on sale). At the cash
    > register, they demanded my name to complete the purchase. Only after I almost walked out did they
    > relent on the demand.
    >
    > The excuse offered: in case I lost the receipt, they could look up the transaction if I wanted to
    > return my purchase.
    >
    > Well, OK, that's the story being offered to the customers. And, even believing for the moment that
    > that >is< the only reason for getting the customer name, that doesn't preclude some marketing
    > dweeb within Performance in the future deciding that there is all this nice customer data just
    > sitting around, and it's time to mine it for marketing purposes.

    Sam: You probably wouldn't like our store either. For anything but the simplest items, we like to
    get a name into our computer... for the very same dumb reason Performance claimed. You have
    absolutely no idea how many times people have purchased something that's gone bad and no longer have
    a receipt. With their name in the computer, no problem, we've got the info. Another useful purpose
    is to look up something they purchased previously, for example, the size of a particular clothing
    item, so they know what to get again.

    If all you're giving either Performance or us is a name, you really don't have much to worry about
    from a privacy standpoint. There's *nothing* they can do with it, unless they want to
    cross-reference it to a data bank that has names and addresses, but since there are many, many
    people with the same name, the likelihood of useful data as a sales tool is very poor.

    One more, entirely self-serving reason for a business to have customer names attached to purchases.
    We live in the real world, and in that real world, people shoplift items... sometimes, they're so
    brazen that they just go into the store, pick something up and bring it to the counter, saying they
    want to return it but don't have a receipt (we've observed this happening, believe it or not). Stops
    them dead in their tracks when you explain that your system keeps track of names & purchases.

    By the way, we do get some customers who are very sensitive to our asking for their name. Not many,
    just some. We have no problem with those customers assuming an alternate identity, if they so desire
    (but would encourage them to keep the same alternate identity to make it easier for them to remember
    in case they *do* have a problem and no longer have a receipt!).

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  13. R.White

    R.White Guest

    "Dan O'Brasky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > It's your name dweeb. They do so at a lot of stores including CompUSA so that they do indeed have
    > a way to reference your purchase and it's date and price if you need to return it or it is
    > defective and needs to be exchange so that you aren't SOL and they don't have a ticked off
    > customer who they have no proof of purchasing through them.
    >
    > What is the worst thing they could do with your information anyway? Send you a catalog or sales
    > announcement? Geez, stop being so paranoid and by the way, try being polite to salespeople in
    > stores instead of an arrogant, self-righteous weenie. <snip>

    That's pretty good coming from a guy who wrote that he would tear down a commercial ad from a
    bulletin board in a grocery store because it wasn't "selling as a service or from a new home based
    office." Who the hell are you to decide what can go on someone else's bulletin board? That's the
    behaviour of an arrogant, self righteous weenie. PKB.

    >
    > "Sam Yorko" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Went in to my local Performance to buy a Topeak Mountain Morph pump (they're on sale). At the
    > > cash register, they demanded my name to complete the purchase. Only after I almost walked out
    > > did they relent on the demand.
    > >
    > > The excuse offered: in case I lost the receipt, they could look up the transaction if I wanted
    > > to return my purchase.
    > >
    > > Well, OK, that's the story being offered to the customers. And, even believing for the moment
    > > that that >is< the only reason for getting the customer name, that doesn't preclude some
    > > marketing dweeb within Performance in the future deciding that there is all this nice customer
    > > data just sitting around, and it's time to mine it for marketing purposes.
    > >
    > > No thanks.
    > >
    > > Sam
     
  14. Example.Com

    Example.Com Guest

    > Yeah, unless they ask for a driver's license to make sure you're the right person!

    I don't have a license, that's why I'm here, I ride a bike...

    "Pat" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > x-no-archive:yes
    >
    > >
    > > If you don't want to give a name and the person behind the register is being told by management
    > > that s/he must get names, give a fake name and address.
    > >
    > > If it is for warranty purposes only, all that counts is you remembering what name you used at
    > > that store.
    >
    > Yeah, unless they ask for a driver's license to make sure you're the right person!
    >
    > Pat in TX
     
  15. In article <[email protected]>, Dan O'Brasky <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >What is the worst thing they could do with your information anyway? Send you a catalog or sales
    >announcement?

    Sell it a thousand times for a penny and god help you if you gave them a phone number.
     
  16. Mike Kruger

    Mike Kruger Guest

    "Bernie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > You don't mind lying about who you are just to get a cashier out of your face? Sorry. I won't do
    > it. Radio Shack used to be prretty insistent about name, etc. blablah,. The proper thing (IMHO) is
    > to decline to give
    up
    > the information and keep your receipt.

    In most cases, clerks are told to ask and then record the answer given. They are not told to
    ask for ID.

    At places where I find this obnoxious, I used to give my name as Bill Clinton 1600 Pennsylvania
    Avenue Washington, DC 90210

    and my phone # as 202-555-1212.

    They laugh, I wink, and we both accomplish our objectives.

    This still works. When an observant sales clerk asked me if that really is my current address, I
    responded, "It's the old one, but they'll forward the mail. I don't want Hillary to know where I'm
    living now." It's a lame joke, but the standards for humor aren't high in the checkout lane.

    So, my advice is to have fun with it. It's generally better to laugh than to get mad.
     
  17. Don Wiss

    Don Wiss Guest

    On Sun, 24 Aug 2003, "example.com" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> Yeah, unless they ask for a driver's license to make sure you're the right person!
    >
    >I don't have a license, that's why I'm here, I ride a bike...

    NY State issues an non-driver ID card that looks almost exactly like a driver's license. You also
    get them at the Motor Vehicles Dept. More info here:
    http://www.nydmv.state.ny.us/license.htm#nondriver. Then follow link to "brochure" for picture.

    Don <donwiss at panix.com>.
     
  18. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Sorni wrote:
    >
    > "B. Sanders" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > >> Heh. Yeah, I like that idea. We should all use the same name, just to
    > > cause a huge, inexplicable spike in the data.
    >
    > "Fabrizio."

    We should all buy ugly cycling clothing on closeout sale using the name Fabrizio Mazzoleni. ;)

    Tom Sherman - Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)
     
  19. Sam Yorko

    Sam Yorko Guest

    Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
    >
    > > Went in to my local Performance to buy a Topeak Mountain Morph pump (they're on sale). At the
    > > cash register, they demanded my name to complete the purchase. Only after I almost walked out
    > > did they relent on the demand.
    > >
    > > The excuse offered: in case I lost the receipt, they could look up the transaction if I wanted
    > > to return my purchase.
    > >
    > > Well, OK, that's the story being offered to the customers. And, even believing for the moment
    > > that that >is< the only reason for getting the customer name, that doesn't preclude some
    > > marketing dweeb within Performance in the future deciding that there is all this nice customer
    > > data just sitting around, and it's time to mine it for marketing purposes.
    >
    > Sam: You probably wouldn't like our store either. For anything but the simplest items, we like to
    > get a name into our computer... for the very same dumb reason Performance claimed. You have
    > absolutely no idea how many times people have purchased something that's gone bad and no longer
    > have a receipt. With their name in the computer, no problem, we've got the info. Another useful
    > purpose is to look up something they purchased previously, for example, the size of a particular
    > clothing item, so they know what to get again.
    >
    > If all you're giving either Performance or us is a name, you really don't have much to worry about
    > from a privacy standpoint. There's *nothing* they can do with it, unless they want to
    > cross-reference it to a data bank that has names and addresses, but since there are many, many
    > people with the same name, the likelihood of useful data as a sales tool is very poor.
    >
    > One more, entirely self-serving reason for a business to have customer names attached to
    > purchases. We live in the real world, and in that real world, people shoplift items... sometimes,
    > they're so brazen that they just go into the store, pick something up and bring it to the counter,
    > saying they want to return it but don't have a receipt (we've observed this happening, believe it
    > or not). Stops them dead in their tracks when you explain that your system keeps track of names &
    > purchases.
    >
    > By the way, we do get some customers who are very sensitive to our asking for their name. Not
    > many, just some. We have no problem with those customers assuming an alternate identity, if they
    > so desire (but would encourage them to keep the same alternate identity to make it easier for them
    > to remember in case they *do* have a problem and no longer have a receipt!).
    >

    Oh, dear, and I was thinking of coming in to Chain Reaction and trying out the new and 2003 Trek
    bicycles to replace my old Trek 930. Seriously.

    And, if you were to pop in my (real) name into Google, my personal web page is the first one to pop
    up. And it hasn't been updated in over five years. So, I would question your assertion that my name
    is anonymous enough.

    And, I have >all< my receipts for >everything< for the past 14 years. Yep, it's anal.

    And, I'm the security expert for the company division I work for; most of the other Google hits on
    my name will be on papers I have submitted to the standards committees I work with to develop new
    security standards. I >know< what can happen with insecurities and information theft.

    Sam
     
  20. Example.Com

    Example.Com Guest

    > NY State issues an non-driver ID card that looks almost exactly like a driver's license. You also
    > get them at the Motor Vehicles Dept. More info here:
    > http://www.nydmv.state.ny.us/license.htm#nondriver.

    I'm not REQUIRED to get a non-driver ID either (and I live in NY State)...

    "Don Wiss" <[email protected]_spam.com> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > On Sun, 24 Aug 2003, "example.com" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >> Yeah, unless they ask for a driver's license to make sure you're the
    right
    > >> person!
    > >
    > >I don't have a license, that's why I'm here, I ride a bike...
    >
    > NY State issues an non-driver ID card that looks almost exactly like a driver's license. You also
    > get them at the Motor Vehicles Dept. More info here:
    > http://www.nydmv.state.ny.us/license.htm#nondriver. Then follow link to "brochure" for picture.
    >
    > Don <donwiss at panix.com>.
     
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