retrofitting gasoline moped with electric hub

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Effi, Jun 29, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Effi

    Effi Guest

    will a gasoline powered moped with an electric hub installed and the gasoline motor disabled qualify
    as an electric bicycle for state laws?
     
    Tags:


  2. Pete

    Pete Guest

    "effi" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > will a gasoline powered moped with an electric hub installed and the gasoline motor disabled
    > qualify as an electric bicycle for state laws?
    >
    >

    Depends on the state.

    Will an elec hub fit a gas moped rear wheel? Or will you change the entire wheel? Will the elec
    motor haul the weigt of a (usually) heavier gas moped?

    Pete
     
  3. Chalo

    Chalo Guest

    "effi" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > will a gasoline powered moped with an electric hub installed and the gasoline motor disabled
    > qualify as an electric bicycle for state laws?

    As long as it meets any pertinent output and speed limitations, and has pedals, it should qualify.
    Washington State's law is as follows, but others are similar:

    "'Electric-assisted bicycle' means a bicycle with two or three wheels, a saddle, fully operative
    pedals for human propulsion, and an electric motor. The electric-assisted bicycle's electric motor
    must have a power output of no more than one thousand watts, be incapable of propelling the device
    at a speed of more than twenty miles per hour on level ground, and be incapable of further
    increasing the speed of the device when human power alone is used to propel the device beyond twenty
    miles per hour."

    But why would you want to do that?

    Such a contraption would be beastly heavy even if the motor were removed, probably over 100 lbs.
    before you add the electric motor and batteries. Moped tires are a grade below even the worst
    bicycle tires when it comes to rolling resistance, and pedaling the thing when the batteries go flat
    would be a nuisance at best. You'd seriously limit range, speed, or both compared to using the same
    motor and battery on a real bicycle. And the conversion is likely to be simpler and cheaper with a
    regular bike than with a moped.

    On top of that, if the thing still looked like a gas moped, you might get unwelcome attention from
    the fuzz for not having your license and registration etc. in order.

    Chalo Colina
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...