Return from Illness

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by Felt_Rider, Mar 8, 2005.

  1. Felt_Rider

    Felt_Rider Active Member

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    Two weekends ago I felt a tingle in my chest and didn't think much about it, but I should have listened to the body. After doing a fairly light ride on a new road path the illness kicked in the next day with chest congestion and a few days after that sinus pressure.

    I laid off of both weight training and the interval training last week and relaxed this past weekend and then returned to doing light weights yesterday. However, I tested the body this morning by trying a few minutes of spinning. My legs were trembling and I felt light headed so it looks like cardio will be out of the picture for another week. I can still feel a little bit of tightness in breathing and my lungs are not quite cleared out.

    When I do come back to the bike do I need to pyramid the training back slowly starting with light riding and easy cardio at the gym building back up over weeks or can I get back into the swing of things and begin to hit the gym interval training again with cycling intervals on the weekend?

    The easier question is do I need to start over again back to square one with the interval training being cautious of a relapse?

    Needless to say this illness hit me right at a point that my interval training was really progressing so I am eager to get back into intervals. So I am trying to stay rational and not cause even greater delay by prematurely returning to the bike.
     
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  2. Felt_Rider

    Felt_Rider Active Member

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    I think I found what I was looking for.

    Velonews.com
    [size=-1]Shaun,
    That's a good question. For every day you're sick it can take anywhere from one to three days of base training to get you back where you were before the illness.[/size]


    [size=-1]The reason to revert back to base training after illness is because you will almost always have a lowered endurance and aerobic capability after being sick. Your red blood cell count, or oxygen carrying capacity, may be dramatically lower, so you need to slowly build back the basic elements of fitness in your comeback.[/size]

    [size=-1]The purpose of the base period is to raise aerobic efficiency and increase endurance so I would concentrate on gradually increasing the training volume and work mostly within heart rate zones 1 and 2.[/size]

    [size=-1]After a few days of fitness improvement, you might progress to muscular endurance work, or zone 3, with short five- to ten-minute efforts. These may progress to one longer 20- to 30-minute interval. After you get to this point and you are comfortable with your progress, you may increase the intensity and gradually move back to where you had planned to be prior to being sick.[/size]

    [size=-1]Don't rush fitness and take it day-by-day, as you start to train after being sick.
    Good luck,
    Joe and Dirk Friel
    [/size]


    Also

    http://www.physsportsmed.com/issues/2002/09_02/okane.htm

    http://bjsm.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/37/4/304
     
  3. Doctor Morbius

    Doctor Morbius New Member

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    That sounds like pretty good advice. I know when I come down with the crud it takes me at least 2 weeks off the bike completely followed by a few weeks at 30 min per ride at low intensity. Then I have to build back up from there. It's very discouraging though when you lose that much time and have to build back up. :(
     
  4. Felt_Rider

    Felt_Rider Active Member

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    I was wondering what to do this weekend.

    There are 3 of us (group formed from this website) that have been riding and all 3 of us are recovering from illness.

    We are trying to decide if we should ride this weekend or not.

    Right now my instincts say if we do it should be no more than 2 hours max. and at a very low intensity. Just to keep from totally detraining. All 3 of us are very eager to get back on the bike since we all missed last weekend from this illness. The Silver Comet trail is where we should ride (if at all) and it has no hills.

    You are right. It is very discouraging to have this happen right in the middle of progressive training and things were really improving for me. I am glad that we are not competitors otherwise it would be even more discouraging.

    Almost everyone at work is sick, everyone at my wife's work is sick and most of my clients are sick.

    Hope things are better for you guys in the north.
     
  5. Felt_Rider

    Felt_Rider Active Member

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    It truely is hard to stay rational and do what I know that I should do and that is to rest.


    It is hard to look out the window on a bright clear day in the mid 60's and just sit in the house and recover.

    What a bummer.
     
  6. closesupport

    closesupport Banned

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    well after five days of tempo rides over 20miles i am almost back to normal just 3minutes to shave off my time before i'm back to under 50minutes, thats after the flu and a case of the chicken pox and around 3wks of inability to ride.

    but i have found that i'm am throwing up at 192bpm where as i wasn't before i was ill, maybe this is due to fitness, but i have laminate flooring and a mop and a good wife that cleans it up :D have you ever considered that your progressive training is overtraining and your not giving your body time to recover.
     
  7. Doctor Morbius

    Doctor Morbius New Member

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    I know my recouperative abilities stink so I would err on the side of caution. But everyone is different. Some people I know have the immune system of a shark and would have made hearty pioneer stock back on the Mayflower. Then there are the people with pip squeak immune systems like myself. I could live in a sealed bubble and still catch colds!! :eek:

    It's snowing outside right now. :mad: Hate it. The moderate winters are the only thing I miss about Atlanta.
     
  8. Felt_Rider

    Felt_Rider Active Member

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    I know from reading your posts on other threads that you were hit much harder than me with illness. Glad to hear that you are doing better.

    I am one of those fortunate people that Dr. Morbius was talking about. I rarely ever get sick. But this time it was almost unavoidable because there is the flu and some sort of viral infection that is going around. Everyone that I know around me has been sick and that is not an exageration. What ever this virus is it very contagious. Fortunately I recovered more quickly than those around me who were put on antibiotics. I don't think I am up to the intensity of training that some of you more advanced riders are at because I am working on a beginner level conditioning. So I don't feel like I am overtraining at this point, but still progressive to me as I try to push a little harder each week on intervals.

    I returned to the weight training this week, but with no cardio at all. I feel ready to start riding again, but I will return very lightly.

    I think from an instinctive feeling that I can return to a light ride, but that is pending on the weather right now. I don't think I will ride if there is a cold wind which they are predicting. Unfortunately I don't have a trainer yet.

    Best wishes on a full recovery and thanks guys for some feedback.
     
  9. maryc

    maryc New Member

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    I don't know if this will be helpful, my experience is more with general fitness than cycling specific....

    Anyway, I find it's impossible to be objective about whether to train or not after illness (especially when the weather's good), so I now just use my resting pulse to determine whether I can train or not.

    Oh, and I'm new here, so if I've posted this in the wrong bit I'm sorry.
     
  10. Felt_Rider

    Felt_Rider Active Member

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    Thanks for your feedback.

    I have been a consultant, competitor and trainer, but very specialized in another type of sport. However, I have just recently heard of using the resting pulse to determine a training day. You are the second to suggest this method. The first was from my boss who was a former cyclist for Clemson University. Even though I have a lot of years studying and training I am still in a learning mode. :)

    Can you tell me more about this?
    What exactly about the resting pulse rate determines whether to train or not?


    closesupport, you did ask a question about overtraining and I forgot to add the following comment. One way that I can tell when I have overtrained is that my lymph glands swell or become painful. It happens 9 out 10 times that I have overtrained. First swollen glands then flu or cold symptoms following a few days later if I cannot fight it off with recovery methods. I am just making this statement for other readers who may experience swollen lymph glands and may not know that it can "possibly" be "one" sign of overtraining.
     
  11. Doctor Morbius

    Doctor Morbius New Member

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    Consider this ... you may not be overtraining via the amount of cycling you've been doing. And you may not be overtraining via the amount of weight training you've been doing (which as I recall was considerable). However ... when combining the two you may quite easily be pushing yourself more than you realize. Intervals are very demanding and your body only has so much recouperative ability, especially when combined with the stresses of everyday life.

    Provided you were bodybuilding right to the point that was optimum for your body's recouperative ability, which is where I would assume you were training as you "fight the good fight" as you put it, then adding the extra cycling/aerobic sessions on top of that may have pushed you over the limit. It doesn't take much. It just has to lie beyond that boundry.

    Now if you cut back slightly on the weight training (I'd bet good money you didn't do that did you? ;) ) and you added the cycling, then your body would have a better chance to adjust accordingly.

    Although I don't know you personally, I do know bodybuilders and how many of them think. Been one myself. One word sums up most of their training habits. That word is obsessive.

    For example, I know a guy named Charlie S. (Jeff is his brother) that used to work out a Coffee's back in the day. As of a couple years ago, even though he was in his late 30's he would do up to 40 sets per bodypart!! :eek: This guy has issues, man.

    He used to quite literally make fun of my training regimen because I would use moderate weights and only do around 8 sets per bodypart, especially for muscle groups like biceps. This, according to him, was absurd and a waste of time. Of course he would juice up quite a bit too. All I had to do was tell him to get out the tape measure to shut him up. His arms finally got over 20" though but that was probably due more to the HGH/Test stack than his training methodology. ;)

    My arms are around 19" but I only do 3 sets of each biceps and triceps once or twice a week. It's a pretty puny routine but I'm not shrinking any. And I no longer have any guilt about doing that few of sets. I could do more weight training but at this stage of the game my goal is to improve aerobic fitness.

    Perhaps next winter I'll cut back on the cycling and do more lifting. It's hard to say, because at 44 I don't really think I'm going to be able to build anything up much regardless of how much or often I lift (naturally, of course). I can maintain pretty easily though. I know I won't be able to focus on both cycling and weights as one of them will suffer.
     
  12. Felt_Rider

    Felt_Rider Active Member

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    Of all those thoughts it could be reduced down to one.

    how did you know?

    :D
     
  13. Doctor Morbius

    Doctor Morbius New Member

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    It's just statistics. Oh, and I have a Magic 8 Ball !!! :D

    Do you know Charlie and Jeff Simon?
     
  14. Felt_Rider

    Felt_Rider Active Member

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    No I don't think so, but maybe I would know them by face.
    I've never been good with names.

    It can't be that I am overtrained. :confused:
    My coworker and riding partner has been out sick for two days and all he does is bike and most of the rest of my company is out sick today and they do nothing, but drink beer and watch TV.
     
  15. Doctor Morbius

    Doctor Morbius New Member

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    It could be that it was a particularly nasty bug that was going around. I have a friend who is one of the few that never catches anything and he's been ill lately. I'm one of those that catches any bug that's going around and I've been extremely lucky with this one. I've also been careful not to be around any of my friends that have had it.

    That explains why they are sick.

    If you want to see a bunch of unhealty sick folk, just go to an Applebee's tonight or any Friday night and check out all of the sedentary out of shape people sitting around the bar slugging down beer, chain smoking and hacking their lungs out. I bet 30% of them have some kind of contagion that they will eagerly share with their neighbor. Some of those people are walking testaments to the CDC. :eek:
     
  16. closesupport

    closesupport Banned

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    Its okey mary. welcome to the board anyhow! and thanks for your input.
     
  17. closesupport

    closesupport Banned

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    I never really get ill, I had a flu jab, but i think it went horribly wrong, since i was at the time coming to the end of my LSD training sessions and just beginning to add the higher intensity workouts that it allowed the flu to take a strong grip and wear my immune system down over 3wks, enough to begin the onset off a full blown case of the flu, bringing my immune system low enough to catch the chicken pox from my son.

    as a guide:

    0-6 hours at aerobic endurance intensity (65-75%MHR) - 8hrs to recover
    30-60 minutes at tempo intensity (85-95%MHR) 8-10 hrs recovery
    75-120minutes at tempo intensity (85-95%MHR) 24-36hrs recovery
    15-45minutes at lactate threshold (90%MHR) 24hours
    60-90minutes at lactate threshold (90%MHR) 24-36hours
    10-30minutes at above lactatate threshold (90%MHR) 24-36hours recovery
    45minutes at above Lactate threshold (90%MHR) 36-48hours recovery

    when i used to do body building i used to do 5 days each day consisted of 1 body part allowing several days for each part to recover, i would use my max weight that i could sustain 3x10 sets off, i found that the muscles grew slowly but my strength increased quite rapidly.

    and every severn weeks or so i would overload my legs allowing them only 36hours to recover for a further several weeks then back to the 5 day rest plan.
     
  18. in.10.city

    in.10.city New Member

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    Come on... there is no such thing as overtraining - only under eating :D . Heavy weight training combined with intense aerobic / anaerobic exercise will definitely overload your systems. Crash training like this is effective for some people but there comes a point when one has to bring things back into line and moderation for a period of time or you'll fall over the edge into unshakable fatigue. And if you are around the wrong people, you're ripe for infection.
     
  19. Doctor Morbius

    Doctor Morbius New Member

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    Don't forget undersleeping! Under eating and under sleeping are the root causes of all overtraining. Isn't that straight from the Barbarian Brothers handbook?

    ... and then there are those that are just ripe! :eek:
     
  20. maryc

    maryc New Member

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    You obviously need to know what your normal resting pulse is first of all - it should be taken first thing in the morning when you wake up, before you get out of bed.

    I have only had to use it a couple of times, when I wanted to train but wasn't sure if I was ready to due to illness.
    In my case, my resting pulse is normally 60 - the first time I used it my resting pulse was 64, so I felt safe to train. The second time, my pulse was 85 - a pretty clear indicator that my body was too busy fighting infection to make any useful progress with training.

    It's also useful to keep an eye on if you think you might be overtraining - a rise in resting pulse is one of the objective signs.
     
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