return to df

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Alma Williams, Dec 18, 2003.

  1. Just wondering. How many of this group started with df, went bent, and then returned to df.
     
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  2. Alma Williams <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Just wondering. How many of this group started with df, went bent, and then returned to df.

    I started with a DF, went bent in 1998 through 2001, and now ride a DF for short trips (<5 mi)
    around town when I might need to lock up the bike outside in the weather for extended periods. But,
    I still ride only the 'bent for long pleasure rides in the country.

    --
    Bill Bushnell
     
  3. Dh

    Dh Guest

    I returned to a df for only a few minutes. I really do not feel safe on a df; I feel if I have an
    accident, I will severely hurt myself. I borrowed my wife's bike for a few minutes and the feeling
    was overwhelming - I did not feel safe. I ride a Giant Revive, a recumbent wannabe.
     
  4. Victor Kan

    Victor Kan Guest

    Alma Williams wrote:
    > Just wondering. How many of this group started with df, went bent, and then returned to df.

    I've half-way in between and may be going back 100% 'bent.

    I went bent a few years ago (with a Linear Mach III) and gave my upright bikes to my brother.

    I went tadpole trike a couple of years ago (Wicks Trimuter) and gave my Mach III to my cousin.

    Then earlier this year I wanted something simpler, lighter and faster than the trike and decided,
    perhaps against my better judgement, to give uprights another chance.

    I got a Specialized Sequoia Sport road bike, which has a whole host of gizmos to make the upright
    experience more comfortable:

    - "Body Geometry" saddle with the center cut out and split rear, with a wider width rear area, plus
    plenty of foam padding (though it's fairly firm)

    - "Body Geometry" handlebars with various "ergonomic" curves mounted to an adjustable stem and
    wrapped with cushy tape with an extra gel layer

    - touring bike length seat stays

    - carbon fork

    It's fine for short rides, but my wrists hurt as I approach 10 miles, and my neck can start hurting
    too, especially on night rides where I have to hold my head up more to be able to see better. I
    don't get any butt discomfort that's worse than recumbent butt, but the 'nads feel smooshed,
    possibly because the nose of the saddle is too wide, also causing leg interference in some riding
    positions.

    I'm playing with the handlebar position (mainly raising them up) and thinking about trying a saddle
    with a narrower nose (likely a Brooks B17 or B17N).

    If I can't dial it in for comfort, I think I'm going to sell the upright and go back to pure
    recumbency.

    One thing I don't want to give up is the speed of the upright (I'm usually 2-4 mph faster on the
    same routes with the upright). I don't know how fast I'd be on an "inexpensive" bent bike, like a
    RANS Rocket, but I'd like to try something like a T-Bone (I'm mainly an USS fan, but I've been
    thinking about OSS high racers these days, and drooling over the thought of a dual 559 T-Bone--I'm
    probably too short for the dual 700c :), or Volae or Bacchetta.

    I'm even toying with the idea of building my own out of wood, perhaps using a rear triangle from a
    cheapo hi-ten steel full suspension mountain bike, a HP Velotechnik hardshell seat from
    hostelshoppe.com and various bits from gaerlan.com.

    Jeez, for $200, you can get from a big box retailer a Honda brand (logo seems the same as the car
    company) full suspension MTB with front disc brake!

    --
    I do not accept unsolicted commercial e-mail. Remove NO_UCE for legitimate replies.
     
  5. Bill

    Bill Guest

    This is a bit different, but I had a Greenspeed Trike, got rid of it, then a few years later got
    another one. Then, I got rid of that one. I have both a DF and a VRex.

    My DF is sometimes necessary for those centuries in HILLY country. Not to start another
    disagreement, but as much as I LOVE recumbents, I have to say that riding in the TOMRV on one
    was difficult and I will do DF next time. I ride the recumbent here in Indiana where it is much
    more flat.

    --
    WILLIAM RALEY
     
  6. Tom Thompson

    Tom Thompson Guest

    "Alma Williams" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Just wondering. How many of this group started with df, went bent, and
    then
    > returned to df.
    >
    Started with DF in youth. Went bent at 40. Rode bent exclusively for a couple years. Went back to DF
    at 42. Rode DF road bikes only for 2 years. Went back to bent at 44. Still bent only at 47. Fourteen
    bikes through the stable in last 7 years, 6 of them bents.

    Tom Thompson
     
  7. Kelly

    Kelly Guest

    "Alma Williams" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Just wondering. How many of this group started with df, went bent, and then returned to df.

    Yes I have but then I come back to recumbents. Sold the 4 or 5 df bikes I had and kept one sorta
    city style df bike. Rode it for a short ride the other day in the rain when I didn't want to
    splatter up my beautiful recumbent.

    Go ahead and go back to the df for a while if you must but you will be back so don't sell the
    recumbent! Kelly
     
  8. Cold Wind

    Cold Wind Guest

    I am at best a casual cyclist who rides several miles per week, pitiful compared to some but hey I
    could have been driving a car for those miles .

    Yes I started out on a DF - about 35 years ago - then went bent for about 5 years on a Tour Easy
    then back to a DF. The reason for going back to DF was that the area I ride in is surrounded by
    hills and for a casual cyclist like me the Tour Easy was not as good as climbing hills as an
    upright. It also put greater strain on my knees - perhaps a pair of clipless pedals with a certain
    amount of float would have helped.

    Lately though the recumbent bug has bitten me again - probably will go the homebuilt route.

    Best thing about the Tour Easy was the comfortable ride , it shone on the level and going downhill .
    Worst thing was going uphill and storing it due to length. If I lived on flat terrain then it would
    be a good choice.

    Recumbent or upright it doesn't matter we are all cyclists !
     
  9. Victor Kan

    Victor Kan Guest

    > - touring bike length seat stays

    Whoops, I mean chain stays.

    --
    I do not accept unsolicted commercial e-mail. Remove NO_UCE for legitimate replies.
     
  10. I'm in the process of doing that right now. After 10 bent years and a garage full of bikes, I'm
    having a custom df built. After riding a friends Waterford last summer, I decided to give 'upwrongs'
    another chance; at least on short-range rides. I don't forsee any df centuries however: bents are
    just too perfect for all-day rides here in Ohio. I think the two can co-exist quite nicely, if you
    stick to the strengths of each genre.

    I even enjoy (blasphemy !) motorcycles......

    Coop Cleveland
     
  11. Jeff Wills

    Jeff Wills Guest

    "Alma Williams" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Just wondering. How many of this group started with df, went bent, and then returned to df.

    I have: A Tour Easy recumbent A Lightning recumbent (down from 2 Lightnings) A K2 dual-suspension
    mountain bike A Steelman track bike with a front brake for road use A Raleigh ten-speed converted to
    a single-speed city bike

    I rode recumbents exclusively for about 9 years, then found my neck had healed enough that I can
    stand a couple hours on a good-fitting upright. I use the recumbents for long rides, the uprights
    for short rides.

    Jeff
     
  12. Mrs Larrington did, having fallen out with the seat of her Kingcycle on a trip to Denmark in '98.
    And I'm currently commuting on a mountain bike, but only until the Speedmachine is transformed from
    a pile of mucky bits into a nice clean shiny and - crucially - non-squeaky bicycle. Hopefully early
    in the new year...

    --

    Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  13. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    I rode a DF for 20 years, including some racing. Started having problems with hands and neck so I
    went to a recumbent (Avatar 2000) in 1980. Rode the recumbent for a few years, including PBP in
    1983, and then rode both DF and recumbent for a few more years. Neck and hands still bothered me on
    DF so in 1997 in sold DF and purchase a Vision
    R45. In 2001 I wanted to ride the Great Divide Tour and decided it would be too difficult on the
    Vision so I purchased a full suspension mountain bike for that trip. Now I ride a Barcroft
    Dakota for most of my touring, mountain bike for dirt riding, and either bike for short trips.
    Hands and neck are still a problem on the mountain bike but I'm willing to put up with the pain
    to do the mountain bike touring. I've found that I tour at the same speed on either a recumbent
    or a DF, but I'm able to ride much futher per day with the recumbent because of the comfort.
    I've toured throughout the US and Canada on the recumbent. If I were only riding paved roads, I
    would just ride a recumbent.

    Jeff
     
  14. Steve Fox

    Steve Fox Guest

    Alma,

    I use both; TE for longer rides and touring, and my "df" for riding with other upright folks on
    shorter jaunts.

    Steve

    Alma Williams wrote:

    >Just wondering. How many of this group started with df, went bent, and then returned to df.
    >
    >
    >
    >

    --
    Steve Fox McKinleyville, CA http://SoTier2003.crazyguyonabike.com

    O \ _____,%) (*)-'------------(*)
     
  15. John

    John Guest

    Steve Fox <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Alma,
    >
    > I use both; TE for longer rides and touring, and my "df" for riding with other upright folks on
    > shorter jaunts.
    >
    > Steve
    >
    > Alma Williams wrote:
    >
    > >Just wondering. How many of this group started with df, went bent, and then returned to df.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >

    My trusty old Specialized Sequoia spends a lot of time in the shed these days. I try to ride it once
    a week so that I don't lose my DF muscles now that my primary bike is a Tour Easy. Even thought the
    Sequoia has a high rise stem and a Brooks suspension saddle, it doesn't come close to the TE is the
    comfort department. I did do a 60+ mile ride on the Sequoia in October, mostly on the C&O Canal tow
    path and dirt roads in Loudon County VA. Comfort on a DF has an awful lot to do with fit and shock
    absorption. My old Sequoia could have a slightly longer top tube. (It is not anything like the newer
    models BTW. All cromoly, no aluminum, carbon, or suspension.) I'd go back to a DF if I could find
    one that meets a few basic requirements. It has to be my size (58 - 60 CM), have an upright seating
    position, and be equipped with braze ons for racks and fenders and a leather saddle. I determined 15
    months ago that trying to find such a bike on the floor of any LBS is futile.

    I love my DF, but for 95 percent of the riding I do, the TE just makes more sense.

    (BTW, if you feel sore after riding a DF don't feel bad. I saw Lance Armstrong on a talk show last
    month and he explained how he does over an hour of stretching so that his back will tolerate all
    those long rides.)
     
  16. John

    John Guest

    [email protected] (Warren Berger) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > John,
    >
    > > I'd go back to a DF if I could find one that meets a few basic requirements.
    >
    > Have you looked here?
    >
    > http://www.rivendellbicycles.com/
    >
    > http://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/bikes.html
    >
    > Warren

    I have indeed. I have also had a bike shop guarantee to fit me. The catch is this: since I have had
    a disk removed from my back, I have less margin of error tha the average biuke buyer. I think it
    only makes sense for me to actually ride the bike I want before I buy it. When I went shopping for a
    recumbent I rode ten different bikes which met my needs and none of them hurt my back. When I went
    shopping for a DF I rode a half dozen bikes, none of which fit properly.

    I've seen a couple of Rivendells. They are works of art. I have no doubt they are very well made
    machines. Sheldon Brown's page is great too. (Read what he has to say about leather saddles and
    gearing for touring bikes.)

    I don't buy shoes without knowing they fit. Before I drop a couple of thousand dollars, I want to be
    sure my DF bike will fit.

    I am quite happy with my Tour Easy. My Sequoia too. It sure would be nice to go to an LBS with as
    wide a range of touring bikes as mountain bikes or hybrids, don't you think?
     
  17. John,

    > It sure would be nice to go to an LBS with as wide a range of touring bikes as mountain bikes or
    > hybrids, don't you think?

    Most bikes sold at LBS's are car accessories...something to mount on your bike rack, and show fellow
    drivers what kind of person you would like to be. :)

    Warren
     
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