Reverse layering - arm warmers

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Tony, Jan 7, 2005.

  1. Tony

    Tony Guest

    Although I mentioned this before, I'll call this my first crackpot theory
    for '05. When exercising in the cold, it's often better to expose more of
    the core body (torso and head), and put heavier layers on the limbs,
    especially inactive limbs. Traditional cold weather layering protects the
    core body, but for those doing heavy exercise the core heats up and soon
    needs more cooling, while the inactive limbs remain cool.

    When running this means more layers on the arms and hands, and when cycling,
    it means more on the feet, arms and hands. My theory is that the body will
    prioritize bloodflow to the active areas and restrict bloodflow to the arms
    and hands when running, producing cold hands even if one is sweating
    substantially at the core.

    So far this year I've begun experimenting with more even layering, as
    opposed to double layering the core only, and twice now I've run with
    bicycle arm warmers under a single layer long-sleeve polypro top. The arm
    warmers produce just the effect I was hoping for - I don't overheat at the
    core, but my hands and arms are noticeably warmer than before, and this
    makes the quality of the run better.

    -Tony
     
    Tags:


  2. Tom Phillips

    Tom Phillips Guest

    Sounds like a theory worth experimenting with.
    Guess I sort of do the same when I unzip my
    fleece to keep from over heating.

    Tony wrote:
    >
    > Although I mentioned this before, I'll call this my first crackpot theory
    > for '05. When exercising in the cold, it's often better to expose more of
    > the core body (torso and head), and put heavier layers on the limbs,
    > especially inactive limbs. Traditional cold weather layering protects the
    > core body, but for those doing heavy exercise the core heats up and soon
    > needs more cooling, while the inactive limbs remain cool.
    >
    > When running this means more layers on the arms and hands, and when cycling,
    > it means more on the feet, arms and hands. My theory is that the body will
    > prioritize bloodflow to the active areas and restrict bloodflow to the arms
    > and hands when running, producing cold hands even if one is sweating
    > substantially at the core.
    >
    > So far this year I've begun experimenting with more even layering, as
    > opposed to double layering the core only, and twice now I've run with
    > bicycle arm warmers under a single layer long-sleeve polypro top. The arm
    > warmers produce just the effect I was hoping for - I don't overheat at the
    > core, but my hands and arms are noticeably warmer than before, and this
    > makes the quality of the run better.
    >
    > -Tony
     
  3. > My theory is that the body will
    prioritize bloodflow to the active areas and restrict bloodflow to the
    arms
    and hands when running, producing cold hands even if one is sweating
    substantially at the core.
    ___

    i've never thought the body could "prioritize" blood flow. I thought
    you could restrict it by truncation / pressure (leg falling asleep,
    etc.). Also this talk about "overheating and the core". From my
    experience....in all temps...slightly unzipping my running jacket or
    fleece top at the collar and down to chest level or therabouts has
    always provided/produced sufficient cooling for my "core" for runs of
    any distance. I could be wrong....but I've never experienced it as
    any more complicated than this.
     
  4. pam_in_sc

    pam_in_sc Guest

    Tony wrote:
    > So far this year I've begun experimenting with more even layering, as
    > opposed to double layering the core only, and twice now I've run with
    > bicycle arm warmers under a single layer long-sleeve polypro top. The arm
    > warmers produce just the effect I was hoping for - I don't overheat at the
    > core, but my hands and arms are noticeably warmer than before, and this
    > makes the quality of the run better.
    >
    > -Tony


    For bicycling I wear a wicking shirt, a windproof vest with mesh back,
    wrist warmers made by cutting off the tops of old socks, and two layers
    of gloves. That gives me core wind protection for cold downhills,
    ventilation where I sweat most, and warm hands. I don't find I mind
    cold elbows if my lower arms are warm and I don't have a gap between
    gloves and shirtsleeves.

    Pam
     
  5. Phil M.

    Phil M. Guest

    Leafing through rec.running, I read a message from [email protected]
    of 08 Jan 2005:

    > Tony wrote:
    >> So far this year I've begun experimenting with more even layering, as
    >> opposed to double layering the core only, and twice now I've run with
    >> bicycle arm warmers under a single layer long-sleeve polypro top. The
    >> arm warmers produce just the effect I was hoping for - I don't
    >> overheat at the core, but my hands and arms are noticeably warmer
    >> than before, and this makes the quality of the run better.
    >>
    >> -Tony

    >
    > For bicycling I wear a wicking shirt, a windproof vest with mesh back,
    > wrist warmers made by cutting off the tops of old socks, and two
    > layers of gloves. That gives me core wind protection for cold
    > downhills, ventilation where I sweat most, and warm hands. I don't
    > find I mind cold elbows if my lower arms are warm and I don't have a
    > gap between gloves and shirtsleeves.


    While bicycling doesn't heat loss through air convection play a much more
    important role in apparel choices?

    Phil M.
     
  6. Tony

    Tony Guest

    pam_in_sc wrote in message <[email protected]>...
    >Tony wrote:
    >> So far this year I've begun experimenting with more even layering, as
    >> opposed to double layering the core only, and twice now I've run with
    >> bicycle arm warmers under a single layer long-sleeve polypro top. The arm
    >> warmers produce just the effect I was hoping for - I don't overheat at

    the
    >> core, but my hands and arms are noticeably warmer than before, and this
    >> makes the quality of the run better.
    >>
    >> -Tony

    >
    >For bicycling I wear a wicking shirt, a windproof vest with mesh back,
    >wrist warmers made by cutting off the tops of old socks, and two layers
    >of gloves. That gives me core wind protection for cold downhills,
    >ventilation where I sweat most, and warm hands. I don't find I mind
    >cold elbows if my lower arms are warm and I don't have a gap between
    >gloves and shirtsleeves.
    >
    >Pam


    How cold are you talking, and how long do you ride for? I can get by with
    getting cold feet and arms for up to an hour, but what I'm talking about is
    getting home and not having cold limbs if possible. It just makes the whole
    experience better.

    -T
     
  7. Tony

    Tony Guest

    [email protected] wrote in message
    <[email protected]>...
    >> My theory is that the body will

    >prioritize bloodflow to the active areas and restrict bloodflow to the
    >arms
    >and hands when running, producing cold hands even if one is sweating
    >substantially at the core.
    >___
    >
    >i've never thought the body could "prioritize" blood flow. I thought
    >you could restrict it by truncation / pressure (leg falling asleep,
    >etc.). Also this talk about "overheating and the core". From my
    >experience....in all temps...slightly unzipping my running jacket or
    >fleece top at the collar and down to chest level or therabouts has
    >always provided/produced sufficient cooling for my "core" for runs of
    >any distance. I could be wrong....but I've never experienced it as
    >any more complicated than this.


    Unzipping works some, but if my core layering is too warm, my back gets hot
    too. It's a subtle layering change. For example, instead of doubling my
    core layer with a coolmax t-shirt and then a long sleeve polypro on top, I'm
    saying the same polypro top over bicycle arm warmers underneath works much
    better, and keeps the body evenly warm. It's well worth experimenting with
    if you ever get back from your runs sweaty but with chilled arms or hands,
    something that always used to happen to me particularly noticeable in the
    shower thawing out afterwards.

    -T
     
  8. thinnmann

    thinnmann Guest

    For running, this is totally the opposite of what I have developed as
    the best layering set-up over my 30 years of hitting the winter roads.
    I keep my core warm - more stuff on my arms becomes sweaty, hot baggage
    I can not get rid of. I have found that wicking underclothes, combined
    with single-layer nylon pants is enough for legs wey down to sub-zero
    temps; but I prefer running tights when it is above freezing. On top,
    unless the air temp or wind chill is under 20 or so, I don't need to
    add more than a fleece or breathable windproof vest over the poly
    shirt. I usually wind up pulling my sleeves up exposing my forearms,
    even when my vest is still zipped up to my chin. I use my arms to
    regulate my body temperature, depending on wind direction and workout
    intensity. The body does send heat away from the torso when it is kept
    warm. Gloves are a key to feeling warm, even at relatively high temps
    like mid 50's. I find if my hands are warm, my body stays warm.
    Taking them off and putting them on during a run also helps manage body
    temp. And of course a polypro hat tops off the winter outfit - which
    is another item to take off and put back on to regulate body temp in
    response to wind and intensity. I run a lot of cold weather races in
    shorts, t-shirt, gloves and a hat - and change things around as the
    race progresses.

    You should keep your core warm for an even more important reason:
    energy conservation. Let's say you are on workout over an hour and you
    are fatigued and you don't realize your body temp dropped a degree.
    Now you turn into the wind and you are at the the point where some of
    your available energy stores - the glycogen you need to sustain
    intensity in your workout - will be wasted on bringing your core temp
    back to normal rather than fueling your muscles. Now you are running
    slower and cold and miserable. On the bike, the situation might be
    worse, as you begin to lose dexterity and visual acuity with the
    lowered body temp and the oncoming bonk...

    CRASH! ...or stop at a convenience store and eat some ho-ho's and a
    cup of coffee :)

    Tony (remove) wrote:
    > Although I mentioned this before, I'll call this my first crackpot

    theory
    > for '05. When exercising in the cold, it's often better to expose

    more of
    > the core body (torso and head), and put heavier layers on the limbs,
    > especially inactive limbs. Traditional cold weather layering protects

    the
    > core body, but for those doing heavy exercise the core heats up and

    soon
    > needs more cooling, while the inactive limbs remain cool.
    >
    > When running this means more layers on the arms and hands, and when

    cycling,
    > it means more on the feet, arms and hands. My theory is that the body

    will
    > prioritize bloodflow to the active areas and restrict bloodflow to

    the arms
    > and hands when running, producing cold hands even if one is sweating
    > substantially at the core.
    >
    > So far this year I've begun experimenting with more even layering, as
    > opposed to double layering the core only, and twice now I've run with
    > bicycle arm warmers under a single layer long-sleeve polypro top. The

    arm
    > warmers produce just the effect I was hoping for - I don't overheat

    at the
    > core, but my hands and arms are noticeably warmer than before, and

    this
    > makes the quality of the run better.
    >
    > -Tony
     
  9. Paul Wilson

    Paul Wilson Guest

    [email protected] said...

    >Also this talk about "overheating and the core". From my
    >experience....in all temps...slightly unzipping my running jacket or
    >fleece top at the collar and down to chest level or therabouts has
    >always provided/produced sufficient cooling for my "core" for runs of
    >any distance. I could be wrong....but I've never experienced it as
    >any more complicated than this.


    That's you. Other respond differently. I find that underdressing the core,
    while selectively covering the forearms allows me to fairly precisely regulate
    my temperature.

    My ideal ambient running temperature is around 35 F. Preferred covering is
    shorts plus a long sleeve tee. Note there is no jacket to unzip. Optionally,
    gloves, but these become irrelevant after a couple of miles. The 35 F is warm
    enough not to cause a throat/lung burn, while allowing me to keep the body
    temp moderate enough to prevent sweating. I absolutely love it, it feels like
    I could run forever.

    Incidentally, there was a discussion of this just a few days ago, where I
    posted the results of my experiment running a 15 miler at 35 F.

    Running at substantially below 35 F may call for another layer on the core, or
    simply a substitution of a light sweatshirt for the long sleeve tee.

    However, I have no experience running at temps below 20 F.
     
  10. Tony

    Tony Guest

    thinnmann wrote in message
    <[email protected]>...
    >For running, this is totally the opposite of what I have developed as
    >the best layering set-up over my 30 years of hitting the winter roads.
    >I keep my core warm - more stuff on my arms becomes sweaty, hot baggage
    >I can not get rid of. I have found that wicking underclothes, combined


    Then to me this shows you might have far too much on to begin with. I've
    been an outdoorsman all my life as well, and I know how to keep warm. What
    I'm suggesting is a layering system that keeps the body warm evenly and
    cools those parts of the body that get too hot with traditional layering
    during heavy exercise.

    >with single-layer nylon pants is enough for legs wey down to sub-zero
    >temps; but I prefer running tights when it is above freezing. On top,
    >unless the air temp or wind chill is under 20 or so, I don't need to
    >add more than a fleece or breathable windproof vest over the poly
    >shirt. I usually wind up pulling my sleeves up exposing my forearms,


    Ive used my forearms and hands to regulate body temperature in the past
    also. Very often I've ended up sweating profusely while having cold hands,
    and getting home with chilled arms and hands even though I'm otherwise
    drenched in sweat. In my experiements using the arm warmers thus far, I get
    back from my runs feeling warmer all over and only sweating lightly.

    >even when my vest is still zipped up to my chin. I use my arms to
    >regulate my body temperature, depending on wind direction and workout
    >intensity. The body does send heat away from the torso when it is kept
    >warm. Gloves are a key to feeling warm, even at relatively high temps


    Yes, the body sends heat to the limbs, but during heavy exercise this simply
    does not seem to happen with the same efficiency because the bloodflow is
    concentrated in and out of the legs. Also rolling up your sleeves or taking
    your gloves off can lead to frostbite and/or chilled limbs in windy cold
    conditions.

    >like mid 50's. I find if my hands are warm, my body stays warm.
    >Taking them off and putting them on during a run also helps manage body
    >temp. And of course a polypro hat tops off the winter outfit - which
    >is another item to take off and put back on to regulate body temp in
    >response to wind and intensity. I run a lot of cold weather races in
    >shorts, t-shirt, gloves and a hat - and change things around as the
    >race progresses.
    >
    >You should keep your core warm for an even more important reason:
    >energy conservation. Let's say you are on workout over an hour and you
    >are fatigued and you don't realize your body temp dropped a degree.
    >Now you turn into the wind and you are at the the point where some of
    >your available energy stores - the glycogen you need to sustain
    >intensity in your workout - will be wasted on bringing your core temp
    >back to normal rather than fueling your muscles. Now you are running
    >slower and cold and miserable. On the bike, the situation might be
    >worse, as you begin to lose dexterity and visual acuity with the
    >lowered body temp and the oncoming bonk...


    In colder conditions when you'll be out a while, it's always wise to bring
    either an extra layer or a warmer hat. Wise winter runners always run into
    the wind first. I'm not suggesting allowing yourself to be cold. I'm saying
    I experimented and I really like what I've found with even layering (as
    opposed to an extra layer around the core), or slight reverse layering such
    as arm warmers underneath. Maybe you're not one of those who've had the
    same problem as me: profuse sweating while at the same time getting back
    with cold arms and hands.

    -T
     
  11. Phil M.

    Phil M. Guest

    Leafing through rec.running, I read a message from
    [email protected] of 08 Jan 2005:

    > [email protected] said...
    >
    >>Also this talk about "overheating and the core". From my
    >>experience....in all temps...slightly unzipping my running jacket or
    >>fleece top at the collar and down to chest level or therabouts has
    >>always provided/produced sufficient cooling for my "core" for runs of
    >>any distance. I could be wrong....but I've never experienced it as
    >>any more complicated than this.

    >
    > That's you. Other respond differently. I find that underdressing the
    > core, while selectively covering the forearms allows me to fairly
    > precisely regulate my temperature.
    >
    > My ideal ambient running temperature is around 35 F. Preferred
    > covering is shorts plus a long sleeve tee. Note there is no jacket to
    > unzip. Optionally, gloves, but these become irrelevant after a couple
    > of miles. The 35 F is warm enough not to cause a throat/lung burn,
    > while allowing me to keep the body temp moderate enough to prevent
    > sweating. I absolutely love it, it feels like I could run forever.
    >
    > Incidentally, there was a discussion of this just a few days ago,
    > where I posted the results of my experiment running a 15 miler at 35
    > F.
    >
    > Running at substantially below 35 F may call for another layer on the
    > core, or simply a substitution of a light sweatshirt for the long
    > sleeve tee.
    >
    > However, I have no experience running at temps below 20 F.


    I think we're neighbors, so my weather is similar. This winter I've been
    compiling data relating to my apparel choices and whether or not they were
    effective. So far, this is what has worked:

    mid 60s or higher - singlet, shorts
    lower 60s - singlet, shorts, gloves
    mid to upper 50s - t-shirt, shorts, gloves, running cap
    low 50s - t-shirt, vest, shorts, gloves, running cap
    upper 40s - longsleeve t-shirt, vest, shorts, gloves, headband
    mid to upper 40s - longsleeve t-shirt, jacket, shorts, gloves, headband
    low 40s - longsleeve turtleneck, jacket, shorts, gloves, drylete hat
    upper 30s - longsleeve turtleneck, jacket, shorts, gloves (2 layers),
    drylete hat
    mid 30s - longsleeve turtleneck, jacket, tights, gloves (2 layers),
    drylete hat

    The coldest it's been this winter during my runs is 35F, so no data for
    runs colder than that.

    Throw rain into the equation and things change. Also, humidity, wind, sun,
    and running intensity play a role, so the temperature alone won't tell me
    what to wear. For example, if I were running at tempo pace, I would likely
    dress as if it were 10 degrees warmer. As for individual differences, I
    think weight is also a factor. At least it is for me. Right now I'm at an
    all time low bodyweight (since I was 13). I'm wearing warmer clothing than
    I did last year during similar runs.

    Phil M.

    --
    "What counts in battle is what you do once the pain sets in." -John Short,
    South African coach.
     
  12. On 2005-01-08, Tony <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Although I mentioned this before, I'll call this my first crackpot theory
    > for '05. When exercising in the cold, it's often better to expose more of
    > the core body (torso and head), and put heavier layers on the limbs,
    > especially inactive limbs. Traditional cold weather layering protects the
    > core body, but for those doing heavy exercise the core heats up and soon
    > needs more cooling, while the inactive limbs remain cool.
    >
    > When running this means more layers on the arms and hands, and when cycling,
    > it means more on the feet, arms and hands. My theory is that the body will


    I already do this to some extent. I seldom wear more than one layer on the
    core. My core layer is a top with windproof polypro on the front and sleeves,
    and lighter, more breathable fleece on the back.

    If it's really cold, I wear gloves under the mitts.

    I think where you get in trouble is if you wear half a dozen layers on your
    core. Just not necessary. But the armwarmers aren't necessary either.

    > So far this year I've begun experimenting with more even layering, as
    > opposed to double layering the core only, and twice now I've run with
    > bicycle arm warmers under a single layer long-sleeve polypro top. The arm


    Don't know what the top is, but if it's cold and windy, you need some wind
    protection. If it weren't for the wind, I'd get by with one of those midweight
    fleece tops.

    > warmers produce just the effect I was hoping for - I don't overheat at the
    > core, but my hands and arms are noticeably warmer than before, and this
    > makes the quality of the run better.


    How cold is the weather where you are ? Without windproof material (either
    a sporthill/sugoi top or some kind of jacket) my nipples would freeze. This
    is a windchill issue, not a hypothermia issue. It's much easier to protect
    yourself from the cold (just keep running!) than it is to protect yourself from
    the wind.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi
    http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  13. User

    User Guest

    In other words, I should be running in chaps, arm warmers, gloves, a
    ski mask, and a thong when it's cold.


    On Sat, 08 Jan 2005 00:51:53 GMT, "Tony"
    <[email protected](remove)hotmail.com> wrote:

    >Although I mentioned this before, I'll call this my first crackpot theory
    >for '05. When exercising in the cold, it's often better to expose more of
    >the core body (torso and head), and put heavier layers on the limbs,
    >especially inactive limbs. Traditional cold weather layering protects the
    >core body, but for those doing heavy exercise the core heats up and soon
    >needs more cooling, while the inactive limbs remain cool.
    >
    >When running this means more layers on the arms and hands, and when cycling,
    >it means more on the feet, arms and hands. My theory is that the body will
    >prioritize bloodflow to the active areas and restrict bloodflow to the arms
    >and hands when running, producing cold hands even if one is sweating
    >substantially at the core.
    >
    >So far this year I've begun experimenting with more even layering, as
    >opposed to double layering the core only, and twice now I've run with
    >bicycle arm warmers under a single layer long-sleeve polypro top. The arm
    >warmers produce just the effect I was hoping for - I don't overheat at the
    >core, but my hands and arms are noticeably warmer than before, and this
    >makes the quality of the run better.
    >
    >-Tony
    >
    >
    >
     
  14. >lower 60s - gloves,
    __

    i gotta ask phil....is this common to see w/runners in your area? 62 F
    and wearing gloves? i imagine this is a personal comfort thing and not
    typical? are you just a sampling on the extreme end....or do some
    there in fact need gloves in the upper 60s and low 70s? just curious.
     
  15. Paul Wilson

    Paul Wilson Guest

    User said...
    >
    >In other words, I should be running in chaps, arm warmers, gloves, a
    >ski mask, and a thong when it's cold.


    Leave out the chaps and the ski mask (unless you plan to rob a bank
    along the way) and you've got it.
     
  16. pam_in_sc

    pam_in_sc Guest

    Phil M. wrote:
    > While bicycling doesn't heat loss through air convection play a much more
    > important role in apparel choices?
    >
    > Phil M.


    Yes--it is really hard not to get chilled on downhills. I've used a
    fleece jacket the little running I have done so far at temperatures in
    the 40s, not needing as much windblocking. But I do recommend cut off
    socks to anyone who wants to experiment cheaply with arm warmers.

    Pam
     
  17. Paul Wilson

    Paul Wilson Guest

    Phil M. said...
    >
    >mid 30s - longsleeve turtleneck, jacket, tights, gloves (2 layers),
    > drylete hat


    I am absolutely amazed at the different coverage requirement two similar
    runners can have in the same climate. My core temp is climbing alarmingly
    just reading about your preferred 35 F outfit. :)

    As to body weight, I am likewise at my lowest in many years. I weighed around
    168-172 through high school and college, and gradually increased to a high of
    182 pounds a couple of years ago.

    Since then, I have dropped around 25 pounds, to a pretty steady 157-158.
    At six feet tall, that makes me somewhat underweight (yes, I am cultivating
    that Auschwitz survivor look). But I have not noticed any effect on my
    cold/heat tolerance. My speed, OTOH, has increased. ;-)
     
  18. pam_in_sc

    pam_in_sc Guest

    Tony wrote:

    > How cold are you talking, and how long do you ride for? I can get by with
    > getting cold feet and arms for up to an hour, but what I'm talking about is
    > getting home and not having cold limbs if possible. It just makes the whole
    > experience better.
    >
    > -T



    Two to three hours with temperatures in the high 40s to low 50s for that
    combination. I use two shirt layers and the vest in the low 40s, which
    is as cold as I have tried (I'm in western South Carolina). I haven't
    worked out a solution to cold feet yet, but that is a particular problem
    of bike shoes.

    I'm basicly agreeing with your idea--a jacket seems too warm and to hold
    in moisture too much. I need the vest as well as some kind of arm
    warmers, but that may be because there is more wind chill in bicycling.

    Pam
     
  19. Since then, I have dropped around 25 pounds, to a pretty steady
    157-158.
    At six feet tall, that makes me somewhat underweight (yes, I am
    cultivating
    that Auschwitz survivor look). But I have not noticed any effect on my
    cold/heat tolerance. My speed, OTOH, has increased. ;-)
    ___

    would not the appropriate index ref. point be body fat % (and that
    change in detecting temp.?). have you read about that woman who can
    expose herself to extreme cold temps in the water...she does those
    arctic challenge swim things...and i thought they referenced how her %
    of body fat aided her in maintaining body warmpth. she physical did
    not look like an athlete.....well maybe a bulgarian female shotputter
    circa 1972 or so.
     
  20. Paul Wilson

    Paul Wilson Guest

    [email protected] said...
    >
    >would not the appropriate index ref. point be body fat % (and that
    >change in detecting temp.?).


    It probably would be. I don't know my body fat percentage, but I am
    guessing it's probably pretty damn low at my height and weight. And
    I don't look like a female Bulgarian shotputter at all - think more
    along the lines of an Auschwitz survivor look. Although my mom says
    Auschwitz survivors looked better. ;-)
     
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