Reynolds Carbon Fork- need comments



gocycling03

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Oct 13, 2003
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I am planning to replace my stock pinarello fork to a reynolds carbon fork. Are reynolds carbon fork reliable and durable? Tell me your experince and your comments about the reynolds carbon fork. I've seen some used ones on ebay at a reasonable price.
 

Rippin

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Feb 8, 2003
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Originally posted by gocycling03
I am planning to replace my stock pinarello fork to a reynolds carbon fork. Are reynolds carbon fork reliable and durable? Tell me your experince and your comments about the reynolds carbon fork. I've seen some used ones on ebay at a reasonable price.

As with any used bike/part they should be inspected carefully for any signs of damage or fatigue. When carbon fails it doesn't bend like alloys, it breaks like wood. Mind you, it takes a lot to bust a well made carbon fork (like really hard crashes - like into a wall). My reynolds seem fine so far, but I haven't put 100 gazillion miles on it to prove it's durability. Thousands of people ride them, they are used as OE forks for some of the top bike manufacturers and it's made by Reynolds, a well trusted name in the bike industry. I don't think you can go wrong with one of their forks.
 

dhk

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Sep 1, 2003
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Sure, Reynolds makes high quality CF forks. But, if you buy one used, from a stranger on ebay, you'll never know how durable it is, because you don't know what kind of use or abuse it's seen. Bad installation, overtightened or wrong stem or internal hardware, poor cut on the steer tube....all these things could ruin the strength of the fork.

I'm a tightwad, but I'd save up and go for new on these. That way, you get them with the right installation instructions and warranty. Plus, you'll be able to register the serial number with Reynolds, so if they do have a safety recall on your fork, they'll notify you.

After all, forks, along with stems and bars, are parts that you don't want ever to fail.
 

pudster

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Aug 20, 2003
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Reynolds Ouza Pro fork is a great fork and so are there other ones. They are made in the States and have excellant durability. The Ouza Comp is made in Tiawan but it seems good also. I would never buy a fork that is used over E-bay.
 

gocycling03

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Oct 13, 2003
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Originally posted by pudster
Reynolds Ouza Pro fork is a great fork and so are there other ones. They are made in the States and have excellant durability. The Ouza Comp is made in Tiawan but it seems good also. I would never buy a fork that is used over E-bay.

Is the ouzo comp 2 made in taiwan too? How do i know what i'm buying is taiwan or US made other than the one you mentioned?
 

dhk

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Originally posted by gocycling03
Is the ouzo comp 2 made in taiwan too? How do i know what i'm buying is taiwan or US made other than the one you mentioned?

The Ouzo Pro has an american flag decal on the bottom of the right fork leg, so I'd think other US-made Reynolds forks would also. But, it's really not important where it's made from a quality standpoint....as long as Reynolds spec's their high level of process quality and testing.

I've been told most of the composite forks/stays world-wide, including Columbus, are made in a few Taiwanese factories.
 

boudreaux

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Oct 16, 2003
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Originally posted by dhk
The Ouzo Pro has an american flag decal on the bottom of the right fork leg, so I'd think other US-made Reynolds forks would also. But, it's really not important where it's made from a quality standpoint....as long as Reynolds spec's their high level of process quality and testing.

I've been told most of the composite forks/stays world-wide, including Columbus, are made in a few Taiwanese factories.
My pros have the flag and 'made in America'.My comp has nothing.
 

aotearoa706

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Oct 2, 2003
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Originally posted by gocycling03
I am planning to replace my stock pinarello fork to a reynolds carbon fork. Are reynolds carbon fork reliable and durable? Tell me your experince and your comments about the reynolds carbon fork. I've seen some used ones on ebay at a reasonable price.
Hi,
Absolutely do not buy a used fork or handlebar unless you know the person you are buying it from and the history of the part.
This goes for all materials, not just carbon. It's simply dangerous.

I am amazed at the number of used forks and handlebars being bought on e-bay and the like.

You can buy a brand new Reynolds fork for $300 or so. I think it's a wise investment.
 

boudreaux

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Oct 16, 2003
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Originally posted by aotearoa706
It's simply dangerous.

I am amazed at the number of used forks and handlebars being bought on e-bay and the like.

You can buy a brand new Reynolds fork for $300 or so. I think it's a wise investment.
I think it's hooey. Any dmage that affects integrity is pretty obvious.
 

dhk

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Sep 1, 2003
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Problem I see here is that the guy buying the used fork is very likely going to install it when it arrives, regardless of condition. After all, he's spent his limited funds and is ready to go riding. Unless he got it shipped under an "inspect and return" option from the seller, he's stuck with it.

Whether it's really dangerous or not is of course debatable. From the failures I've seen in other composite stuff, there should be plenty of warning time with flexing, wobbles or creaking noises before the thing actually breaks and throws you to the ground.
 

pudster

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Aug 20, 2003
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What do you do when you buy it and it looks bad? That is why I would not buy anything used on E-bay.
 

Reynoldsouzopro

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Jan 12, 2005
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I am new to this site so I am not sure if I am reaching everyone or replying to one person so here goes::)

Does anyone know how Carbon forks have failed? (of any brand)
Do they fail at the forks?, at the Crown? or at the top of the steer tube ?where the stem attaches to the steerer??
Do they ever fail in the area between the bearings?, (within the head tub of the frame).
Are failures more a result of crashes? and/ or wrong installation of stems and use of star nuts??
I have a Reynolds ouzo pro fork that was mounted on a used colnago Master light.
I put 900 plus miles on it when I decided to change the stem. I was shocked :eek: to find that it had been mounted with a star nut that kind of damaged the carbon fiber steer tube going an inch down from the top.:mad:
I have already installed an aluminum sleave in the steer tube with JB weld steel epoxy.
I am debating whether or not it is safer now.:confused: ,(albeit I would have never known the fork steer tube was damaged had I not changed the stem and would have been really ****** as I was flying thru the air and tumbling on the ground changing from a man to a quivering mass of flesh if it would have broken.:rolleyes: )
 

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