Reynolds tubing - 531 etc + advice on tourer / semi-mountain bike (eg Orbit)

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Hywel & Ros, Apr 13, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Hywel & Ros

    Hywel & Ros Guest

    Sorry if this is old hat (I did try searching first), but can any of you more knowledable folk
    explain the merits of various types of tubing ? I'm after a semi-mountainbike / tourer for the wife
    and the various models have different types of tubing. When I was a lad, you just bought 531
    (preferably double-butted) if you could afford it and "normal" steel otherwise.

    Various numbers I've seen are : 520 531 525 725
    853.

    No doubt some are better for racing, heavier guage for touring and what-have-you but the main thing
    is that I don't want to pay £500 quid for "ordinary" steel tube.

    And the 2nd part of my question is does anyone have any comments on Orbit bycycles generally and the
    "caraway comfort" in particular. The bike has to have butcher's boy / butterly bars not drops and
    have a lady's frame. The intended purpose is (lightish) touring + some tracks.

    Thanks in advance

    Hywel
     
    Tags:


  2. Steel is going out of fashion because they've worked out how to make aluminium bikes cheaper, for
    the same weight. Get aluminium with a good guarantee, then. None of these materials makes the
    slightest difference to comfort.
     
  3. Bryan

    Bryan Guest

    "Gearóid Ó Laoi, Garry Lee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Steel is going out of fashion because they've worked out how to make aluminium bikes cheaper, for
    > the same weight. Get aluminium with a good guarantee, then. None of these materials makes the
    > slightest difference to comfort.

    Steel going out of fashion? how to start a flame war in one sentance.

    Anyway or specifics on Reynolds tubing you cna check their site www.reynoldsusa.com which gives
    technical info, Sheldon gives some real differences about frame materials (at the end of the day
    it's all down to personal preference and how the frame is made), but 520 seems to be replaceing 531
    (as far as I can tell)

    As for Orbit, I've current;y got a Silver Medal and it rides very well, doing about 50 miles per
    day commuting on it and had no problems at all. I tried the Caraway before getting the Silver
    medal, but it didn't suit my riding style (I've got quite long arms and the top tube is quite
    short), but apart form that it seemed like a nice bike, responsive and capable of handling anything
    you could throw at it. Give them a ring, they are all very friendly up there and willing to answer
    any questions you have.

    Bryan
     
  4. Hywel & Ros <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Sorry if this is old hat (I did try searching first), but can any of you more knowledable folk
    >explain the merits of various types of tubing ? I'm after a semi-mountainbike / tourer for the wife
    >and the various models have different types of tubing. When I was a lad, you just bought 531
    >(preferably double-butted) if you could afford it and "normal" steel otherwise.

    Most mass-market bikes are aluminium these days, but 531 remains a sensible material for
    steel bicycles.
    --
    David Damerell <[email protected]> Kill the tomato!
     
  5. [email protected] (Bryan) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Anyway or specifics on Reynolds tubing you cna check their site www.reynoldsusa.com which gives
    > technical info, Sheldon gives some real differences about frame materials (at the end of the day
    > it's all down to personal preference and how the frame is made), but 520 seems to be replaceing
    > 531 (as far as I can tell)

    Depends on the tube - for Cr-Mo fans, 520 and 525 (are they the same thing?) are the suggested
    replacements. The air-hardening equivalent is Reynolds 631.

    David E. Belcher

    Dept. of Chemistry, University of York
     
  6. > Steel going out of fashion? how to start a flame war in one sentance.

    Not at all. I ride about 6 bikes at the moment, and 3 are steel. I've mostly had steel in my time.
    I'm not pro-aluminium at all but it is cheaper for the weight.
     
  7. Hywel & Ros

    Hywel & Ros Guest

    Thank for the info - I hadn't spotted www.reynoldsusa.com in my searches.

    So here's my next question - why 26" rather than 700C ?

    Thanks

    Hywel
     
  8. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Fri, 18 Apr 2003 14:45:35 +0100, "Hywel & Ros" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >So here's my next question - why 26" rather than 700C ?

    26" wheels ae stronger and there are more tyre sizes available, especially in less-developed
    countries (standard mountain bike size, obviously). We have 26" wheels on our family triplet - but
    you know who makes those, so no surprise there.

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
    dynamic DNS permitting)
    NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
    work. Apologies.
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...