Rice Pudding - how difficult to make?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Ohmster, Jan 27, 2004.

  1. Ohmster

    Ohmster Guest

    My girl and myself really do enjoy a good rice pudding. We have been buying already prepared, fresh
    rice pudding at the supermarket. They have some kind of imported deserts and it is really good, but
    at three dollars for a small tub of it, I would like to find a less expensive way to enjoy this
    delectable dish.

    I have rice, milk, sugare, cinnamon, and things like that, is rice pudding very difficult to make? I
    once tried to dump cooked rice into vanilla pudding but somehow, that just did not turn out right. I
    guess that is just not the way. Can someone please give me a basic but still very good tasting,
    rich, rice pudding recipe and some cooking tips for this delectable dish?

    Thank you all in advance.

    --
    ~Ohmster
     
    Tags:


  2. Sam D.

    Sam D. Guest

    "Ohmster" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > My girl and myself really do enjoy a good rice pudding. We have been
    buying
    > already prepared, fresh rice pudding at the supermarket. They have some
    kind
    > of imported deserts and it is really good, but at three dollars for a
    small
    > tub of it, I would like to find a less expensive way to enjoy this
    delectable
    > dish.
    >
    > I have rice, milk, sugare, cinnamon, and things like that, is rice pudding very difficult to make?
    > I once tried to dump cooked rice into vanilla
    pudding
    > but somehow, that just did not turn out right. I guess that is just not
    the
    > way. Can someone please give me a basic but still very good tasting, rich, rice pudding recipe and
    > some cooking tips for this delectable dish?

    There are countless variations of recipes for rice pudding. Here is a fairly simple one I that have
    used. I like raisins but if you don't they could be ommitted.

    Rice Pudding with Raisins

    1 Cup Rice, cooked 2 Large Eggs, beaten 2 Cups Milk
    1/2 Cup Sugar 1 teaspoon Vanilla
    2/4 Cup Raisins Cinnamon

    In a mixing bowl combine all ingredients except cinnamon. Pour mixture into a lightly buttered
    casserole dish (1 1/2 quart size). Place casserole in a pan filled 1 inch deep with hot water. Bake
    at 300 deg for 75 to 90 minutes or until set. At 30 minute intervals check the pan for evaporation
    and add more water if necessary. When the pudding is done, a clean knife inserted into the center
    should come out with nothing clinging to it. Serve warm or chilled with whipped cream or whipped
    topping, if desired. Makes: 4 servings
     
  3. Loki

    Loki Guest

    il Tue, 27 Jan 2004 12:49:52 GMT, Ohmster ha scritto:

    > I have rice, milk, sugare, cinnamon, and things like that, is rice pudding very difficult to make?
    > I once tried to dump cooked rice into vanilla pudding but somehow, that just did not turn out
    > right. I guess that is just not the way. Can someone please give me a basic but still very good
    > tasting, rich, rice pudding recipe and some cooking tips for this delectable dish?

    First you want the right type of rice - short grain.

    I just put uncooked rice in a saucepan with loads of whole milk, some sugar, and heat. The original
    way was to put it in the oven and bake slowly. The slower, the creamier the result.
    --
    Cheers, Loki [ Brevity is the soul of wit. W.Shakespeare ]
     
  4. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Ohmster wrote:

    > My girl and myself really do enjoy a good rice pudding. We have been buying already prepared,
    > fresh rice pudding at the supermarket. They have some kind of imported deserts and it is really
    > good, but at three dollars for a small tub of it, I would like to find a less expensive way to
    > enjoy this delectable dish.
    >
    > I have rice, milk, sugare, cinnamon, and things like that, is rice pudding very difficult to make?
    > I once tried to dump cooked rice into vanilla pudding but somehow, that just did not turn out
    > right. I guess that is just not the way. Can someone please give me a basic but still very good
    > tasting, rich, rice pudding recipe and some cooking tips for this delectable dish?

    I posted one a while ago from a Greek cook book. It should be in the archives. It involves boiling
    arborio rice for a few minutes and then simmering it in scaled milk and some sugar for 40 minutes ,
    temper beaten eggs and add to the hot mixture then cook slowly for another 15-20 minutes until
    creamy (raisins optional). Stir in some vanilla, pour into serving bowls and sprinkle cinnamon on
    top. The pudding is a work of love and gives a creamy result. It is delicious and worth the effort.
     
  5. Ohmster

    Ohmster Guest

    "Sam D." <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > There are countless variations of recipes for rice pudding. Here is a fairly simple one I that
    > have used. I like raisins but if you don't they could be ommitted.

    WOW! This is like, SO fantastic! Thank you thank Sam!

    --
    ~Ohmster
     
  6. Ohmster

    Ohmster Guest

    "Loki" <[email protected]> wrote in news:952342953711881.NC-
    [email protected]:

    > First you want the right type of rice - short grain.
    >
    > I just put uncooked rice in a saucepan with loads of whole milk, some sugar, and heat. The
    > original way was to put it in the oven and bake slowly. The slower, the creamier the result.

    Very good, thank you Loki. Short grain rice? What is that, like "regular" white rice, the kind you
    put 1 cup rice, 2 cups water, bring to boil, simmer, covered, for 14 minutes? You mean don't use
    Uncle Ben's or something?

    --
    ~Ohmster
     
  7. Ohmster

    Ohmster Guest

    Dave Smith <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > I posted one a while ago from a Greek cook book. It should be in the archives. It involves
    > boiling arborio rice for a few minutes and then simmering it in scaled milk and some sugar for 40
    > minutes , temper beaten eggs and add to the hot mixture then cook slowly for another 15-20
    > minutes until creamy (raisins optional). Stir in some vanilla, pour into serving bowls and
    > sprinkle cinnamon on top. The pudding is a work of love and gives a creamy result. It is
    > delicious and worth the effort.

    Hmmmm, rather exotic and *special* sounding. Will save this one for Valentine's Day and do the
    simple one first. Thank you Dave.

    --
    ~Ohmster
     
  8. Ohmster <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > "Loki" <[email protected]> wrote in news:952342953711881.NC-
    > [email protected]:
    >
    >> First you want the right type of rice - short grain.
    >>
    >> I just put uncooked rice in a saucepan with loads of whole milk, some sugar, and heat. The
    >> original way was to put it in the oven and bake slowly. The slower, the creamier the result.
    >
    > Very good, thank you Loki. Short grain rice? What is that, like "regular" white rice, the kind you
    > put 1 cup rice, 2 cups water, bring to boil, simmer, covered, for 14 minutes? You mean don't use
    > Uncle Ben's or something?

    Short grain rice is just that...short. If you look at the grains of rice, long grain rice has a
    very elongated shape. The grains of short grain rice and almost round in shape. The advantage is
    that it gives rice pudding a much creamier texture. It's not always the easiest to find in a
    supermarket, but many to carry it. It's worth looking for. If you can't find it, you can substitute
    arborio rice. Arborio is a type of short grain rice, but typically larger grains. It will require
    additional cooking.

    HTH

    Wayne
     
  9. Sf

    Sf Guest

    On Tue, 27 Jan 2004 23:58:06 GMT, Ohmster
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Dave Smith <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >
    > > I posted one a while ago from a Greek cook book. It should be in the archives. It involves
    > > boiling arborio rice for a few minutes and then simmering it in scaled milk and some sugar for
    > > 40 minutes , temper beaten eggs and add to the hot mixture then cook slowly for another 15-20
    > > minutes until creamy (raisins optional). Stir in some vanilla, pour into serving bowls and
    > > sprinkle cinnamon on top. The pudding is a work of love and gives a creamy result. It is
    > > delicious and worth the effort.
    >
    > Hmmmm, rather exotic and *special* sounding. Will save this one for Valentine's Day and do the
    > simple one first. Thank you Dave.

    I don't use a recipe, but I do partially parboil the rice in water and then finish it off in
    milk.... my friend, the Dane, does hers in milk from the get go. Mine is good. Hers is GOOD.

    Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
  10. Sf

    Sf Guest

    On Wed, 28 Jan 2004 04:07:52 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > Short grain rice is just that...short. If you look at the grains of rice, long grain rice has a
    > very elongated shape. The grains of short grain rice and almost round in shape. The advantage is
    > that it gives rice pudding a much creamier texture. It's not always the easiest to find in a
    > supermarket, but many to carry it. It's worth looking for. If you can't find it, you can
    > substitute arborio rice. Arborio is a type of short grain rice, but typically larger grains. It
    > will require additional cooking.
    >
    Sometimes they call it Pearl Rice.

    Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
  11. Loki

    Loki Guest

    il Tue, 27 Jan 2004 23:56:31 GMT, Ohmster ha scritto:

    > "Loki" <[email protected]> wrote in news:952342953711881.NC-
    > [email protected]:
    >
    > > First you want the right type of rice - short grain.
    > >
    > > I just put uncooked rice in a saucepan with loads of whole milk, some sugar, and heat. The
    > > original way was to put it in the oven and bake slowly. The slower, the creamier the result.
    >
    > Very good, thank you Loki. Short grain rice? What is that, like "regular" white rice, the kind you
    > put 1 cup rice, 2 cups water, bring to boil, simmer, covered, for 14 minutes? You mean don't use
    > Uncle Ben's or something?

    Short grain is a short stubby grain, suitable for puddings. Arborio is similar in style but is a
    specific rice in its own right. Basmati and Jasmine are both long grain rices and tend to keep their
    individuality when cooked properly. They make nice pilau. We can get rices named or just by
    description - short white, long white, parboiled (never saw what shape they were) , brown short,
    brown long, Jasmine, Basmati (long), Arborio (short), sticky rice (short and used for sushi). And no
    doubt there are others I've not seen. I tend to ignore the UncleBens half cooked stuff and buy
    Sunrise or go to my local Indian store and buy 5 kgs of Basmati in a cute cloth zipped bag.

    I was rereading my recipe. You can add beaten eggs when you put it in the oven to bake. I've also
    added cream on a whim.

    Hope that helps.
    --
    Cheers, Loki [ Brevity is the soul of wit. W.Shakespeare ]
     
  12. Gina

    Gina Guest

    Ohmster <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Dave Smith <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >
    > > I posted one a while ago from a Greek cook book. It should be in the archives. It involves
    > > boiling arborio rice for a few minutes and then simmering it in scaled milk and some sugar for
    > > 40 minutes , temper beaten eggs and add to the hot mixture then cook slowly for another 15-20
    > > minutes until creamy (raisins optional). Stir in some vanilla, pour into serving bowls and
    > > sprinkle cinnamon on top. The pudding is a work of love and gives a creamy result. It is
    > > delicious and worth the effort.
    >
    > Hmmmm, rather exotic and *special* sounding. Will save this one for Valentine's Day and do the
    > simple one first. Thank you Dave.

    Dave, here is a recipe from my Grandmother. It has been in my family for decades, I'd never make any
    other recipe, it's simple, delicious, but a bit time consuming: In a saucepan combine 4 TBSPS.of
    white rice (the cheaper the better-not Success or another fast cooking instant rice) 5 TBSP of
    sugar, a pinch of salt, 1 egg and 1 quart of whole milk. Cook on a low heat, stirring constantly
    until thick and bubblely and rice is soft about 1 hour. When completely cooked remove from heat and
    add 1 TBSP. of vanilla. Serve warm or chilled. It is sooo worth the effort! Enjoy!
     
  13. Lynn Gifford

    Lynn Gifford Guest

    I tend to ignore the UncleBens half cooked stuff and buy Sunrise or go to my local Indian store and
    buy 5 kgs of Basmati in a cute cloth zipped bag.
    >

    I use Basmati & Jasmine rices for different things but I prefer Uncle Ben's because the grains stay
    separate and it cooks perfectly and stays fluffy. It is not, however, what you're looking for if you
    want to eat it with chopsticks or your fingers!

    Lynn in Fargo With two large Asian groceries within a block of my apt. Anybody interested in fresh
    banana flowers? Thai eggplant?
     
  14. Ohmster

    Ohmster Guest

    sf <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > I don't use a recipe, but I do partially parboil the rice in water and then finish it off in
    > milk.... my friend, the Dane, does hers in milk from the get go. Mine is good. Hers is GOOD.

    Really now. Could you elaborate a bit on this, ah, er, ...nobody?

    --
    ~Ohmster
     
  15. Ohmster

    Ohmster Guest

    [email protected] (Gina) wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Dave, here is a recipe from my Grandmother. It has been in my family for decades, I'd never make
    > any other recipe, it's simple, delicious, but a bit time consuming: In a saucepan combine 4
    > TBSPS.of white rice (the cheaper the better-not Success or another fast cooking instant rice) 5
    > TBSP of sugar, a pinch of salt, 1 egg and 1 quart of whole milk. Cook on a low heat, stirring
    > constantly until thick and bubblely and rice is soft about 1 hour. When completely cooked remove
    > from heat and add 1 TBSP. of vanilla. Serve warm or chilled. It is sooo worth the effort! Enjoy!

    ....snagged! Thank you Gina.

    --
    ~Ohmster
     
  16. Ohmster

    Ohmster Guest

    Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Short grain rice is just that...short. If you look at the grains of rice, long grain rice has a
    > very elongated shape. The grains of short grain rice and almost round in shape. The advantage is
    > that it gives rice pudding a much creamier texture. It's not always the easiest to find in a
    > supermarket, but many to carry it. It's worth looking for. If you can't find it, you can
    > substitute arborio rice. Arborio is a type of short grain rice, but typically larger grains. It
    > will require additional cooking.

    Thanks Wayne.

    --
    ~Ohmster
     
  17. Ohmster

    Ohmster Guest

    "Loki" <[email protected]> wrote in news:95231279168211889.NC-
    [email protected]:

    > Short grain is a short stubby grain, suitable for puddings. Arborio is similar in style but is a
    > specific rice in its own right. Basmati and Jasmine are both long grain rices and tend to keep
    > their individuality when cooked properly. They make nice pilau. We can get rices named or just by
    > description - short white, long white, parboiled (never saw what shape they were) , brown short,
    > brown long, Jasmine, Basmati (long), Arborio (short), sticky rice (short and used for sushi). And
    > no doubt there are others I've not seen. I tend to ignore the UncleBens half cooked stuff and buy
    > Sunrise or go to my local Indian store and buy 5 kgs of Basmati in a cute cloth zipped bag.
    >
    > I was rereading my recipe. You can add beaten eggs when you put it in the oven to bake. I've also
    > added cream on a whim.
    >
    > Hope that helps.

    Very helpful, Thank you Loki.

    --
    ~Ohmster
     
  18. Ohmster

    Ohmster Guest

    [email protected] (Gina) wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    >
    > Dave, here is a recipe from my Grandmother. It has been in my family for decades, I'd never make
    > any other recipe, it's simple, delicious, but a bit time consuming: In a saucepan combine 4
    > TBSPS.of white rice (the cheaper the better-not Success or another fast cooking instant rice) 5
    > TBSP of sugar, a pinch of salt, 1 egg and 1 quart of whole milk. Cook on a low heat, stirring
    > constantly until thick and bubblely and rice is soft about 1 hour. When completely cooked remove
    > from heat and add 1 TBSP. of vanilla. Serve warm or chilled. It is sooo worth the effort! Enjoy!
    >

    Gina, would that be a beaten egg? This really does sound so delicious!

    --
    ~Ohmster
     
  19. Ohmster

    Ohmster Guest

    sf <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Sometimes they call it Pearl Rice.
    >
    >
    > Practice safe eating - always use condiments

    Thanks for the tip, hmmmmm, "no glove, no grub", is that it? <chuckle>

    --
    ~Ohmster
     
  20. Ohmster

    Ohmster Guest

    [email protected] (Lynn Gifford) wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > I use Basmati & Jasmine rices for different things but I prefer Uncle Ben's because the grains
    > stay separate and it cooks perfectly and stays fluffy. It is not, however, what you're looking for
    > if you want to eat it with chopsticks or your fingers!

    Ahhh, so one could use Uncle Bens! No no, chopsticks and fingers not necessary, a spoon and a
    sprinkle of cinnamon will do just fine. I do like it a bit thick when cold though. Thank you Lynn.

    --
    ~Ohmster
     
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