Rice Pudding - how difficult to make?



On Wed, 28 Jan 2004 23:25:55 GMT, Ohmster
<[email protected]> wrote:

> sf <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
>
> > I don't use a recipe, but I do partially parboil the rice in water and then finish it off in
> > milk.... my friend, the Dane, does hers in milk from the get go. Mine is good. Hers is GOOD.
>
> Really now. Could you elaborate a bit on this, ah, er, ...nobody?

Which method?

Practice safe eating - always use condiments
 
I made rice pudding the old-fashioned way (and, yes, parboiled or completely boiled rice as well)
for over 30 years. And then I discovered rice pudding in cans. I have never bothered since with all
the work and slow cooking that traditional rice pudding involves.

How's that for laziness? But my family think the canned rice pudding is actually better than the old
way - and it took them a long time to realise I was heating it up in a microwave out of cans!

Daisy.

Don't assume malice for what stupidity can explain.
 
Ohmster <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> [email protected] (Gina) wrote in news:[email protected]:
>
> >
> > Dave, here is a recipe from my Grandmother. It has been in my family for decades, I'd never make
> > any other recipe, it's simple, delicious, but a bit time consuming: In a saucepan combine 4
> > TBSPS.of white rice (the cheaper the better-not Success or another fast cooking instant rice) 5
> > TBSP of sugar, a pinch of salt, 1 egg and 1 quart of whole milk. Cook on a low heat, stirring
> > constantly until thick and bubblely and rice is soft about 1 hour. When completely cooked remove
> > from heat and add 1 TBSP. of vanilla. Serve warm or chilled. It is sooo worth the effort! Enjoy!
> >
>
> Gina, would that be a beaten egg? This really does sound so delicious!

Dave, I don't bother, I just combine the rice, sugar, salt and egg in the saucepan and slightly beat
it all together before adding the milk. Also, I found that warming the milk in the microwave a bit
before adding helps to prevent the milk from seperating.
 
Gina wrote:

>
> > > Dave, here is a recipe from my Grandmother. It has been in my family for decades, I'd never
> > > make any other recipe, it's simple, delicious, but a bit time consuming: In a saucepan combine
> > > 4 TBSPS.of white rice (the cheaper the better-not Success or another fast cooking instant
> > > rice) 5 TBSP of sugar, a pinch of salt, 1 egg and 1 quart of whole milk. Cook on a low heat,
> > > stirring constantly until thick and bubblely and rice is soft about 1 hour. When completely
> > > cooked remove from heat and add 1 TBSP. of vanilla. Serve warm or chilled. It is sooo worth
> > > the effort! Enjoy!
> > >
> >
> > Gina, would that be a beaten egg? This really does sound so delicious!
>
> Dave, I don't bother, I just combine the rice, sugar, salt and egg in the saucepan and slightly
> beat it all together before adding the milk. Also, I found that warming the milk in the microwave
> a bit before adding helps to prevent the milk from seperating.

The recipe that I use calls for par boiling the rice and then cooking it in the milk for 40-45
minutes at low heat before adding the egg. Then it has to be cooking slowly over low heat until it
thickens, another 15-20 minutes with a lot os gentle stirring. Cooking it on higher heat causes the
milk to separate. It also sputters a lot, making it a little dangerous. It is a labour of love, but
the results are so good it is worth it.