Richard Long

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Martin Richardson, Jan 3, 2006.

  1. Fran

    Fran Guest

    [email protected] said...
    >
    > "Fran" <[email protected]> schreef in bericht
    > news:[email protected]
    > > [email protected] said...
    > >> Hi Fran,
    > >>
    > >> I forgot to ask you one thing.
    > >> Did you like the *salmiakkogels*. (these round things, sweet on the
    > >> outside
    > >> but on the inside...:)
    > >>

    > > What on earth...?? Get in car, start engine, drive off. Unwrap sweet,
    > > suck. Hmm, interesting. Not exactly sweet, but not exactly sour. Sort
    > > of hinting at salt. Well that's OK, I'm used to the rather strange
    > > things eaten by the Dutch... Suck some more. Mmm, quite nice, getting a
    > > bit sweeter. Reaching the middle... aaarghhh! What the..?? A mixture
    > > of what appears to be salt and bicarbonate of soda, with a bit of
    > > tartaric acid thrown in for good measure??? Arrive at college laughing
    > > immoderately but in need of something to drink. Schlurp cup of tea,
    > > feel better.
    > >
    > > I'll have another one in a bit and see if I can persuade any of my
    > > children to join me. Should be interesting... :))

    >
    > We are SO sorry......
    >
    > .....that we couldn't see your face :)))


    ROFL!!
    >
    > How are the kids ? Or do I have to talk to their lawyers ?
    >

    I haven't tried them yet. I will though, I promise :))

    --
    To reply see 'from' in headers; lose the domain, and insert dots and @
    where common sense dictates.
     


  2. Fran

    Fran Guest

    [email protected] said...
    > > We are SO sorry......
    > >
    > > .....that we couldn't see your face :)))

    >
    > ROFL!!
    > >
    > > How are the kids ? Or do I have to talk to their lawyers ?
    > >

    > I haven't tried them yet. I will though, I promise :))
    >
    >

    Oddly enough, none of them seem to like the sweeties that a nice man in
    the Netherlands sent me. How strange. By the way, what exactly is
    zoethoutwortelextract - sodium bicarb or something? I've managed to
    work out the rest, even if I don't believe it. It /claims/ to have
    sugar in it...
    --
    To reply see 'from' in headers; lose the domain, and insert dots and @
    where common sense dictates.
     
  3. Phil Cook

    Phil Cook Guest

    Fran wrote:

    >Oddly enough, none of them seem to like the sweeties that a nice man in
    >the Netherlands sent me. How strange. By the way, what exactly is
    >zoethoutwortelextract - sodium bicarb or something?


    Well if you put it as one word into babelfish it coughs and says what?
    But split it into individual words (Dutch being similar to German in
    making great big long words from running lots of short ones together)
    and it says zoethout wortel extract is liquorice carrot extract.
    --
    Phil Cook looking north over the park to the "Westminster Gasworks"
     
  4. theo

    theo Guest

    "Phil Cook" <[email protected]> schreef in bericht
    news:[email protected]
    > Fran wrote:
    >
    >>Oddly enough, none of them seem to like the sweeties that a nice man in
    >>the Netherlands sent me. How strange. By the way, what exactly is
    >>zoethoutwortelextract - sodium bicarb or something?

    >
    > Well if you put it as one word into babelfish it coughs and says what?
    > But split it into individual words (Dutch being similar to German in
    > making great big long words from running lots of short ones together)
    > and it says zoethout wortel extract is liquorice carrot extract.


    Phil and Fran,

    it's always a risk to split words and translate them literally. Extract is
    right (of course) but there's definitely no carrot (the orange one) in it.
    IIRC there was a thread a couple of months ago where I mentioned the word
    *zoethoutwortel*. The thread was about *Blackroot* , iirc, that stick-like
    piece of wood you could chew.
    I don't know how to translate *salmiak* but *kogels* are *bullets*. (in the
    old fashioned round way).
    Most kids in Holland are fond of them. Strange yours aren't :)

    BTW I'm reading *The letters of J.R.R.Tolkien* at the moment. I've always
    been interested in the connections and similarities and differences between
    the Nordic or Germanic languages.

    --
    "Beannachd leibh"

    Theo
    www.theosphotos.fotopic.net
     
  5. Fran

    Fran Guest

    [email protected] said...
    > Fran wrote:
    >
    > >Oddly enough, none of them seem to like the sweeties that a nice man in
    > >the Netherlands sent me. How strange. By the way, what exactly is
    > >zoethoutwortelextract - sodium bicarb or something?

    >
    > Well if you put it as one word into babelfish it coughs and says what?
    > But split it into individual words (Dutch being similar to German in
    > making great big long words from running lots of short ones together)
    > and it says zoethout wortel extract is liquorice carrot extract.
    >

    Licorice and carrot?? I don't believe a word of it. There isn't a hint
    of licorice or of carrot in that 'interesting' delicacy - except perhaps
    in the colour...
    --
    To reply see 'from' in headers; lose the domain, and insert dots and @
    where common sense dictates.
     
  6. Fran

    Fran Guest

    [email protected] said...
    > it's always a risk to split words and translate them literally. Extract is
    > right (of course) but there's definitely no carrot (the orange one) in it.
    > IIRC there was a thread a couple of months ago where I mentioned the word
    > *zoethoutwortel*. The thread was about *Blackroot* , iirc, that stick-like
    > piece of wood you could chew.


    That's what I know as licorice root, I assume? I like that. What I
    want to know is what on earth is in the middle of those strange
    'sweets' that makes them so bitter. It's exactly like sodium bicarb or
    baking powder - but the ingredients mentioned appear to be glucose
    syrup, sugar, salmiak salt (celery salt perhaps?), zootlewordle extract,
    and caramel-sugar-syrup.

    > I don't know how to translate *salmiak* but *kogels* are *bullets*. (in the
    > old fashioned round way).
    > Most kids in Holland are fond of them. Strange yours aren't :)
    >

    It's the bit in the middle I can't quite come to terms with; my children
    are rather distrustful of any foreign sweets I give them since the day I
    offered the salt licorice around without bothering to tell them what it
    was.

    Hold on... <google google> Aha! Hear ye Wikipedia, which may or may not
    be correct:

    <quote>
    Salmiakzout is ammoniumchloride (NH4Cl) oftewel de verbinding van
    ammoniak (NH3) en zoutzuur (HCl). Hoewel de grondstoffen zeer agressieve
    stoffen zijn, vormen ze samen een zout dat de basis vormt voor een
    snoeppoeder voor kinderen. Aan het snoeppoeder wordt ook nog
    zoethoutwortelextract en soms suiker en aardappelmeel toegevoegd.
    Salmiakzout wordt ook gebruikt om drop een zoute smaak te geven. De naam
    salmiak komt van het Franse salé ammoniaque wat ammoniakzout betekent.
    </quote>

    Ammonium chloride?? You /eat/ ammonium chloride? In *sweets*???

    And you reckon /my/ children are strange! :)

    --
    To reply see 'from' in headers; lose the domain, and insert dots and @
    where common sense dictates.
     
  7. theo

    theo Guest

    "Fran" <[email protected]> schreef in bericht
    news:[email protected]

    > It's the bit in the middle I can't quite come to terms with; my children
    > are rather distrustful of any foreign sweets I give them since the day I
    > offered the salt licorice around without bothering to tell them what it
    > was.
    >
    > Hold on... <google google> Aha! Hear ye Wikipedia, which may or may not
    > be correct:


    I'll try to translate.

    > <quote>
    > Salmiakzout is ammoniumchloride (NH4Cl) oftewel de verbinding van
    > ammoniak (NH3) en zoutzuur (HCl). Hoewel de grondstoffen zeer agressieve
    > stoffen zijn, vormen ze samen een zout dat de basis vormt voor een
    > snoeppoeder voor kinderen. Aan het snoeppoeder wordt ook nog
    > zoethoutwortelextract en soms suiker en aardappelmeel toegevoegd.
    > Salmiakzout wordt ook gebruikt om drop een zoute smaak te geven. De naam
    > salmiak komt van het Franse salé ammoniaque wat ammoniakzout betekent.
    > </quote>


    Salmiaksalt is ammoniumchloride (NH4C1) or the combination of ammoniak (NH3)
    and stomachacid (?) (HC1). Although the basic compounds are very aggressive,
    together they form a salt that forms the basis for a candypowder for
    children. An extract of liqorice root is added, sometimes with sugar or
    potato-weat (?sago?). Salmiaksalt is also used to give liqorice it's salty
    taste. The name salmiak derives from the french sale ammoniaque what means
    ammoniumchloride.

    > Ammonium chloride?? You /eat/ ammonium chloride? In *sweets*???
    >
    > And you reckon /my/ children are strange! :)


    Tell them it's something Harry Potter makes. (Do you also have small
    liqorice called *Potter's*?)
    The man from the Netherlands isn't trying to poison them, he merely tries to
    turn them into toads ;-)

    --
    "Beannachd leibh"

    Theo
    www.theosphotos.fotopic.net
     
  8. Fran

    Fran Guest

    [email protected] said...
    > > And you reckon /my/ children are strange! :)

    >
    > Tell them it's something Harry Potter makes. (Do you also have small
    > liqorice called *Potter's*?)
    > The man from the Netherlands isn't trying to poison them, he merely tries to
    > turn them into toads ;-)
    >

    I looked on a website selling various Dutch and other licorice products
    and came across Potter's. I know them well, but not by that name. In
    the UK they are more usually known as Negroids (now unavailable 'cos the
    name's politically suspect) or Imps. Small licorice/aniseed/menthol
    things used by choirboys (and girls) of all ages in a desperate attempt
    not to fluff the top C at the end of the descant in Hark The Herald
    Angels Sing :)

    BTW, you don't need to turn them into toads - they can do that on their
    own most of the time...

    --
    To reply see 'from' in headers; lose the domain, and insert dots and @
    where common sense dictates.
     
  9. Phil Cook

    Phil Cook Guest

    theo wrote:

    >> and it says zoethout wortel extract is liquorice carrot extract.

    >
    >Phil and Fran,
    >
    >it's always a risk to split words and translate them literally. Extract is
    >right (of course) but there's definitely no carrot (the orange one) in it.


    Yeah but no but yeah but. You take that literal translation and think
    out of the box a little and carrot becomes root and we end up with
    liquorice root extract.

    A bit like strassenbhanhelterseller (or whatever it is) becomes street
    railway stopping place which is a tram stop.
    --
    Phil Cook looking north over the park to the "Westminster Gasworks"
     
  10. Phil Cook

    Phil Cook Guest

    theo wrote:

    >"Fran" <[email protected]> schreef in bericht


    >> Ammonium chloride?? You /eat/ ammonium chloride? In *sweets*???
    >>
    >> And you reckon /my/ children are strange! :)

    >
    >Tell them it's something Harry Potter makes. (Do you also have small
    >liqorice called *Potter's*?)


    We've got Pontefract Cakes. Actually sweet liquorice "coins" for want
    of a better description.
    --
    Phil Cook looking north over the park to the "Westminster Gasworks"
     
  11. Bootlaces

    Bootlaces Guest

    Whilst ambling through uk.rec.walking
    I noticed Fran <[email protected]>
    had opined on Sun, 15 Jan 2006 18:27:13 -0000
    in <news:[email protected]>:

    > [email protected] said...
    >> it's always a risk to split words and translate them literally. Extract is
    >> right (of course) but there's definitely no carrot (the orange one) in it.
    >> IIRC there was a thread a couple of months ago where I mentioned the word
    >> *zoethoutwortel*. The thread was about *Blackroot* , iirc, that stick-like
    >> piece of wood you could chew.

    >
    > That's what I know as licorice root, I assume? I like that. What I
    > want to know is what on earth is in the middle of those strange
    > 'sweets' that makes them so bitter. It's exactly like sodium bicarb or
    > baking powder - but the ingredients mentioned appear to be glucose
    > syrup, sugar, salmiak salt (celery salt perhaps?), zootlewordle extract,
    > and caramel-sugar-syrup.
    >
    >> I don't know how to translate *salmiak* but *kogels* are *bullets*. (in the
    >> old fashioned round way).
    >> Most kids in Holland are fond of them. Strange yours aren't :)
    >>

    > It's the bit in the middle I can't quite come to terms with; my children
    > are rather distrustful of any foreign sweets I give them since the day I
    > offered the salt licorice around without bothering to tell them what it
    > was.
    >
    > Hold on... <google google> Aha! Hear ye Wikipedia, which may or may not
    > be correct:
    >
    > <quote>
    > Salmiakzout is ammoniumchloride (NH4Cl) oftewel de verbinding van
    > ammoniak (NH3) en zoutzuur (HCl). Hoewel de grondstoffen zeer agressieve
    > stoffen zijn, vormen ze samen een zout dat de basis vormt voor een
    > snoeppoeder voor kinderen. Aan het snoeppoeder wordt ook nog
    > zoethoutwortelextract en soms suiker en aardappelmeel toegevoegd.
    > Salmiakzout wordt ook gebruikt om drop een zoute smaak te geven. De naam
    > salmiak komt van het Franse salé ammoniaque wat ammoniakzout betekent.
    > </quote>
    >
    > Ammonium chloride?? You /eat/ ammonium chloride? In *sweets*???
    >
    > And you reckon /my/ children are strange! :)


    You want to try stroopwafel on them. /The/ contribution to international
    cuisine courtesy of the Netherlandse.

    --
    Hey, dood. Don't kill me!
     
  12. Chris Hill

    Chris Hill Guest

    In message <[email protected]>,
    Bootlaces <[email protected]> writes

    <snip>

    >You want to try stroopwafel on them. /The/ contribution to international
    >cuisine courtesy of the Netherlandse.


    Oh yes. Anyone at work going to Holland is expected to bring back
    stroopwafels.

    A whole day's calories in every bite.
    --
    Chris Hill
     
  13. Bootlaces

    Bootlaces Guest

    Whilst ambling through uk.rec.walking
    I noticed Chris Hill <[email protected]>
    had opined on Fri, 20 Jan 2006 22:06:57 +0000
    in <news:[email protected]>:

    > In message <[email protected]>,
    > Bootlaces <[email protected]> writes
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    >>You want to try stroopwafel on them. /The/ contribution to international
    >>cuisine courtesy of the Netherlandse.

    >
    > Oh yes. Anyone at work going to Holland is expected to bring back
    > stroopwafels.
    >
    > A whole day's calories in every bite.


    Not quite <g>

    --
    Passionate kiss like spider's web.
    Soon leads to undoing of fly.
     
  14. theo

    theo Guest

    "Bootlaces" <[email protected]> schreef in bericht
    news:[email protected]
    snip
    >
    > You want to try stroopwafel on them. /The/ contribution to international
    > cuisine courtesy of the Netherlandse.


    Warm them up above a cup of hot tea (not too long :). Hmmmmmmm...

    --
    "Beannachd leibh"

    Theo
    www.theosphotos.fotopic.net
     
  15. Bootlaces

    Bootlaces Guest

    Whilst ambling through uk.rec.walking
    I noticed theo <[email protected]>
    had opined on Sat, 21 Jan 2006 08:57:13 +0100
    in <news:[email protected]>:

    > "Bootlaces" <[email protected]> schreef in bericht
    > news:[email protected]
    > snip
    >>
    >> You want to try stroopwafel on them. /The/ contribution to international
    >> cuisine courtesy of the Netherlandse.

    >
    > Warm them up above a cup of hot tea (not too long :). Hmmmmmmm...


    From what I see, they are fairly robust. Any experience of them as a
    backpacking food? Just a few to go with the last hot frink of the day...

    --
    Isn't it strange? The same people who laugh at
    gypsy fortune tellers take economists seriously.
    {J.K.Galbraith}
     
  16. theo

    theo Guest

    "Bootlaces" <[email protected]> schreef in bericht
    news:[email protected]
    > Whilst ambling through uk.rec.walking
    > I noticed theo <[email protected]>
    > had opined on Sat, 21 Jan 2006 08:57:13 +0100
    > in <news:[email protected]>:
    >
    >> "Bootlaces" <[email protected]> schreef in bericht
    >> news:[email protected]
    >> snip
    >>>
    >>> You want to try stroopwafel on them. /The/ contribution to international
    >>> cuisine courtesy of the Netherlandse.

    >>
    >> Warm them up above a cup of hot tea (not too long :). Hmmmmmmm...

    >
    > From what I see, they are fairly robust. Any experience of them as a
    > backpacking food? Just a few to go with the last hot frink of the day...


    They can certainly be used as backpacking food. The wrapping isn't robust
    enough for your backpack so you have to put them in a normal plastic bag.

    --
    "Beannachd leibh"

    Theo
    www.theosphotos.fotopic.net
     
  17. Fran

    Fran Guest

    [email protected] said...
    > last hot frink of the day
    >

    Lemurs?
    --
    To reply see 'from' in headers; lose the domain, and insert dots and @
    where common sense dictates.
     
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